The Forest of Trees Kindle Ö The Forest Kindle -

The Forest of Trees Kindle Ö The Forest Kindle -

The Forest of Trees [KINDLE] ❃ The Forest of Trees By Anita Kovacevic – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk When a family of four faces the brutal reality of their city life they readily embrace a complete change Emma and David Stone with their kids Jeremy and Dot move to a small town with their big hopes H When a family of four faces the brutal reality of their city life they readily embrace a complete change Emma and David Stone with their kids Jeremy and Dot move to a small town with their big hopes However small towns have their own secrets – from urban legends about The Forest of Trees to family skeletons in closets everyone knows aboutGradually Jeremy and Dot make some new and unusual friends whereas Emma and David start working again and things seem to be going for the better But evil never rests The Jacksons a bigoted and brutal The Forest Kindle - family of pig farmers however scary are not the only ones leaning towards malice The new friendships grow the villains will struggle to retain power Will the arrival of the newcomers tip the scales in favour of the good or the evil And how can The Forest of Trees play its part in the solutionThe life between the legendary Forest of Trees and the small town of Tillsworth is separated only by a road All it takes to reconnect is to take that path.


6 thoughts on “The Forest of Trees

  1. Jean Gill Jean Gill says:

    What are we doing for and to our kids? This gripping novel makes you wonderThis is not a children's story although some youngsters would relate to many parts of it Through a gripping story the author faces us with some of those big uestions behind the news every day and helps us understand people better How can we protect our children sometimes from each other? What drives some adults and some children to commit horrific crimes? How does our relationship with nature affect our nature as a human society?The Forest of Trees is unusual in the way it links a fantasy storyline that seems almost childish with a realistic depiction of bullying and abuse in a small town location Every detail of school life is convincing both from teachers' viewpoints and students' The youngsters and their relationships below the radar of adult intervention are heart breaking in their potential for both good and evil I was rooting for Jeremy I also appreciated the uiet goodness of many of the adults which I found moving than any one superhero could have beenBad things happen in the book and in life and the Ready Room is something we all need You'll have to read the book to understand what it is and whyThis book annoyed me because it didn't make its mind up which sort of book it was The title annoyed me until I read the author's explanation for it which you don't read unless you get past the title The fairy annoyed me maybe it was just the word 'fairy' that seemed childish and yet the faery folk of legend aren't childish at all All my criticisms disappeared against the inescapable fact that I keep thinking about this book It's as important as We Need To Talk About Kevin and Micka in showing us something about youngsters today We need to talk about Philip


  2. Elizabeth Horton-Newton Elizabeth Horton-Newton says:

    I’ve long been a fan of the versatile author Anita Kovacevic’s writing With her dark fantasy The Forest of Trees she proves she can tackle any genre This is a richly imaginative story filled with good and evil fairies leprechaun talking trees and animals and a plethora of human characters Skillfully weaving the world of fantasy with the everyday lives of a family teachers and students and townspeople Kovacevic leads the reader on challenging examination of courage and love When the Stone family mother Emma and father David move with their young children Jeremy and Dot from the big city to a house in the town of Tillsworth they hope their lives will be better Leaving behind the cruelty of the city they anticipate happier days Soon after arriving Jeremy discovers The Forest of Trees and its uniue inhabitants Emma gets a dream job as a teacher in the very school Jeremy attends After a short time David also gets a job While things seem to be falling into place dark undercurrents are at work On the surface the town seems pleasant and friendly But there are residents who want to retain their murky hold on the town An evil family of pig farmers the Jacksons uietly spread unpleasantness Along with the delightfully mysterious trees in the Forest of Trees a leprechaun named Speck and a pixie named Tallulah bring joy to the forest and The Gable Speck’s stories magically illustrated by Tallulah are the miracles of the woods As the trees befriend the Jeremy and Dot the children grow stronger in their ability to withstand the teasing of the Jackson gang Jeremy’s courage soon inspires other children at the school to be brave This is a timely tale of good versus evil the struggle to be strong in the face of cruelty There is a sad side to the tale as some of the school children who are unkind do not fare well There are those adults whose lives are touched by the malignancy of the Jackson’s who also suffer As with all good fantasies there is conflict resolution and plenty of action in between This is not a fairy tale for children but an adult examination of the way belief in oneself can change the course of lives It is lovely frightening joyous and painful Anita Kovacevic can put another notch in her author's belt with this brilliantly written book


  3. B.J. Tiernan B.J. Tiernan says:

    The Forest of Trees is a detailed inspection of human behavior The good and the evil the cowardice and the courage the love and the hate of the human condition This is no light story but a dark fairy tale that invites us to take a closer look at the track we have chosen to follow on our journey through life It is a call to believe in oneself and to search for the wisdom to know that we have the ability to change our course at any given timeThe characters are believable and at times one may feel that they are reading two stories in one but the masterful blending and weaving carries the reader through At times it is difficult at times it is fun but through it all there is a personal lesson for each of us


  4. Irena Čačić Irena Čačić says:

    From the moment I started reading The Forrest of Trees I was drawn into the magic style of author Anita Kovačević Some of the parts were like the fairytale happy and carefree but other parts were nothing but the harsh reality The ability of the author to jump from one to another was so easy I loved the beautiful description of the forest creatures but I also loved the other side of the coin descriptions of the bitter and dark characters that made me sick Although the title sounds like some kids tale it's far away from easy reading Love to the author


  5. Claire Stibbe Claire Stibbe says:

    I bought this book knowing I was going to be transported to another world Who hasn’t walked through a wood wondering what the trees would say if only they could talk? Divided by a road The Forest of Trees is described as a tree stump graveyard where no animals desire to live and in stark contrast to the brighter forest on the other side It begs the uestion is this book about darkness and light? Brutality versus compassion? For hundreds of years the forest has become brittle and unsatisfied They are no longer connected to the town’s people who have no desire to co habit with nature preferring instead the novelty of a worldly life That is until Curly the largest of the common oaks comes face to face with young Jeremy and latterly Dot the unifiers of old and new With characters like Selma an ancient dry beech and a chestnut tree called Gertrude this is an intimate and beautifully cultivated taleWith alternating story threads The Forest of Trees takes us through a range of character arcs some sneaky conniving monsters and some merely broken and lost It reminded me of a potter gluing together shattered fragments of clay to make everything whole again Even the school is a character cracks and all perhaps garnered by the author’s academic background Some of my favorites were Speck the singing berry pie snitching leprechaun and Tallulah the clumsy pixie who makes story webs And worthy of note is David and Emma’s determination to conuer the unconuerable I enjoyed being carried along by illustrations of the good the brave the corrupt the honorable all with a touch of mystery and their fair share of secrets It’s always sad saying goodbye to characters when we close a book But I have to say I was rather tearful when I closed this one Kovacevic brings her masterful world building and agile imagination to bear on a host of entertaining creatures For me this served as a new and vibrant take on Tolkein’s Ent ish forest where everything intertwines all the way down to Curly and Selma’s branches Thank you for this wonderful Sunday read Highly recommended


  6. Wolf Schimanski Wolf Schimanski says:

    After having read Threshold and loving it I was really looking forward to this one What I got out of it however was confusion on a number of fronts Was this an adult or children's story? It had strong elements of both Each character could have been a book all on its own and I think the author almost achieved that It was beautifully written but I found myself looking for something to focus me on what Anita was trying to get at here It was finally pulled together at the end but there was too much character development and too many characters to keep me as a reader focused This is what can happen when a writer hones in on characters and their stories rather than something to tie them all together and give them a common focus Each book is an evolving of a writer and I look forward to Anita's next one


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6 thoughts on “The Forest of Trees

  1. Jean Gill Jean Gill says:

    What are we doing for and to our kids? This gripping novel makes you wonderThis is not a children's story although some youngsters would relate to many parts of it Through a gripping story the author faces us with some of those big uestions behind the news every day and helps us understand people better How can we protect our children sometimes from each other? What drives some adults and some children to commit horrific crimes? How does our relationship with nature affect our nature as a human society?The Forest of Trees is unusual in the way it links a fantasy storyline that seems almost childish with a realistic depiction of bullying and abuse in a small town location Every detail of school life is convincing both from teachers' viewpoints and students' The youngsters and their relationships below the radar of adult intervention are heart breaking in their potential for both good and evil I was rooting for Jeremy I also appreciated the uiet goodness of many of the adults which I found moving than any one superhero could have beenBad things happen in the book and in life and the Ready Room is something we all need You'll have to read the book to understand what it is and whyThis book annoyed me because it didn't make its mind up which sort of book it was The title annoyed me until I read the author's explanation for it which you don't read unless you get past the title The fairy annoyed me maybe it was just the word 'fairy' that seemed childish and yet the faery folk of legend aren't childish at all All my criticisms disappeared against the inescapable fact that I keep thinking about this book It's as important as We Need To Talk About Kevin and Micka in showing us something about youngsters today We need to talk about Philip

  2. Elizabeth Horton-Newton Elizabeth Horton-Newton says:

    I’ve long been a fan of the versatile author Anita Kovacevic’s writing With her dark fantasy The Forest of Trees she proves she can tackle any genre This is a richly imaginative story filled with good and evil fairies leprechaun talking trees and animals and a plethora of human characters Skillfully weaving the world of fantasy with the everyday lives of a family teachers and students and townspeople Kovacevic leads the reader on challenging examination of courage and love When the Stone family mother Emma and father David move with their young children Jeremy and Dot from the big city to a house in the town of Tillsworth they hope their lives will be better Leaving behind the cruelty of the city they anticipate happier days Soon after arriving Jeremy discovers The Forest of Trees and its uniue inhabitants Emma gets a dream job as a teacher in the very school Jeremy attends After a short time David also gets a job While things seem to be falling into place dark undercurrents are at work On the surface the town seems pleasant and friendly But there are residents who want to retain their murky hold on the town An evil family of pig farmers the Jacksons uietly spread unpleasantness Along with the delightfully mysterious trees in the Forest of Trees a leprechaun named Speck and a pixie named Tallulah bring joy to the forest and The Gable Speck’s stories magically illustrated by Tallulah are the miracles of the woods As the trees befriend the Jeremy and Dot the children grow stronger in their ability to withstand the teasing of the Jackson gang Jeremy’s courage soon inspires other children at the school to be brave This is a timely tale of good versus evil the struggle to be strong in the face of cruelty There is a sad side to the tale as some of the school children who are unkind do not fare well There are those adults whose lives are touched by the malignancy of the Jackson’s who also suffer As with all good fantasies there is conflict resolution and plenty of action in between This is not a fairy tale for children but an adult examination of the way belief in oneself can change the course of lives It is lovely frightening joyous and painful Anita Kovacevic can put another notch in her author's belt with this brilliantly written book

  3. B.J. Tiernan B.J. Tiernan says:

    The Forest of Trees is a detailed inspection of human behavior The good and the evil the cowardice and the courage the love and the hate of the human condition This is no light story but a dark fairy tale that invites us to take a closer look at the track we have chosen to follow on our journey through life It is a call to believe in oneself and to search for the wisdom to know that we have the ability to change our course at any given timeThe characters are believable and at times one may feel that they are reading two stories in one but the masterful blending and weaving carries the reader through At times it is difficult at times it is fun but through it all there is a personal lesson for each of us

  4. Irena Čačić Irena Čačić says:

    From the moment I started reading The Forrest of Trees I was drawn into the magic style of author Anita Kovačević Some of the parts were like the fairytale happy and carefree but other parts were nothing but the harsh reality The ability of the author to jump from one to another was so easy I loved the beautiful description of the forest creatures but I also loved the other side of the coin descriptions of the bitter and dark characters that made me sick Although the title sounds like some kids tale it's far away from easy reading Love to the author

  5. Claire Stibbe Claire Stibbe says:

    I bought this book knowing I was going to be transported to another world Who hasn’t walked through a wood wondering what the trees would say if only they could talk? Divided by a road The Forest of Trees is described as a tree stump graveyard where no animals desire to live and in stark contrast to the brighter forest on the other side It begs the uestion is this book about darkness and light? Brutality versus compassion? For hundreds of years the forest has become brittle and unsatisfied They are no longer connected to the town’s people who have no desire to co habit with nature preferring instead the novelty of a worldly life That is until Curly the largest of the common oaks comes face to face with young Jeremy and latterly Dot the unifiers of old and new With characters like Selma an ancient dry beech and a chestnut tree called Gertrude this is an intimate and beautifully cultivated taleWith alternating story threads The Forest of Trees takes us through a range of character arcs some sneaky conniving monsters and some merely broken and lost It reminded me of a potter gluing together shattered fragments of clay to make everything whole again Even the school is a character cracks and all perhaps garnered by the author’s academic background Some of my favorites were Speck the singing berry pie snitching leprechaun and Tallulah the clumsy pixie who makes story webs And worthy of note is David and Emma’s determination to conuer the unconuerable I enjoyed being carried along by illustrations of the good the brave the corrupt the honorable all with a touch of mystery and their fair share of secrets It’s always sad saying goodbye to characters when we close a book But I have to say I was rather tearful when I closed this one Kovacevic brings her masterful world building and agile imagination to bear on a host of entertaining creatures For me this served as a new and vibrant take on Tolkein’s Ent ish forest where everything intertwines all the way down to Curly and Selma’s branches Thank you for this wonderful Sunday read Highly recommended

  6. Wolf Schimanski Wolf Schimanski says:

    After having read Threshold and loving it I was really looking forward to this one What I got out of it however was confusion on a number of fronts Was this an adult or children's story? It had strong elements of both Each character could have been a book all on its own and I think the author almost achieved that It was beautifully written but I found myself looking for something to focus me on what Anita was trying to get at here It was finally pulled together at the end but there was too much character development and too many characters to keep me as a reader focused This is what can happen when a writer hones in on characters and their stories rather than something to tie them all together and give them a common focus Each book is an evolving of a writer and I look forward to Anita's next one

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