Dont Tell the Grown-Ups Kindle ´ the Grown-Ups

Dont Tell the Grown-Ups Kindle ´ the Grown-Ups

Dont Tell the Grown-Ups [PDF / Epub] ☉ Dont Tell the Grown-Ups By Alison Lurie – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk In Sixteen Spirited Essays, Pulitzer Prize Winning Novelist Alison Lurie, Who Is Also One Of Our Wittiest And Most Astute Cultural Commentators, Explores The World Of Children S Literature From Lewis In Sixteen Spirited Essays, Pulitzer Prize Winning Novelist the Grown-Ups eBook ↠ Alison Lurie, Who Is Also One Of Our Wittiest And Most Astute Cultural Commentators, Explores The World Of Children S Literature From Lewis Carroll To Dr Seuss, Mark Twain To Beatrix Potter Dont Tell ePUB ´ And Shows That The Best Loved Children S books Tend To Challenge Rather Than Uphold Respectable Adult Values.


10 thoughts on “Dont Tell the Grown-Ups

  1. skein skein says:

    Read in one sitting and late into the night because it was SO MCUH FUN, although, yes, uneven, and difficult to follow in places if one hasn t read the original books Children s literature Lurie says runs under the radar, and the authors of children s literature often possess the same attribute, being commonly women they are able to critique the social world, the world of adulthood, in a way that only outsiders can do They are able to get away it because they are only women, and their stori Read in one sitting and late into the night because it was SO MCUH FUN, although, yes, uneven, and difficult to follow in places if one hasn t read the original books Childr...


  2. Katie Katie says:

    Back in the day, this book was subtitled Subversive Children s Literature, which I think isa propos But maybe someone didn t like the double entendre The chapter on The Folklore of Childhood which is in my edition, if not the current one certainly suggests that children are pretty subversive, with their jumprope rhymes about sex and booze, and their pervasive myths about the adult world, and this certainly squares with my own memories pretty well Certainly my own favorite childhoo Back in the day, this book was subtitled Subversive Children s Literature, which I think isa propos But maybe someone didn t like the double entendre The chapter on The Folklore of Childhood which is in my edition, if not the...


  3. Destinee Sutton Destinee Sutton says:

    For me, this book didn t live up to its title Sure, it s kind of about the subversive power of children s literature, but it s actually mostly about the biographies of certain children s authors and how certain children s stories are archetypes for adult literary fiction And it s not a cohesive book at all It s a series of essays that were probably originally intended for lit crit mags When Lurie does address subversiveness, it s usually historical the book was published in 1990, so I did For me, this book didn t live up to its title Sure, it s kind of about the subversive power of children s literature, but it s actually mo...


  4. Amy Amy says:

    My favorite quotation from the book The Secret Garden is the story of two unhappy, sickly, overcivilized children who achieve health and happiness through a combination of communal gardening, mystical faith, daily exercises, encounter group type confrontation, and a health food diet I think this book is mistitled, but I recommend it to people who are interested in Victorian life literature There are some amazing biographical facts about J.M Barrie, John Ruskin and so on There is als My favorite quotation from the book The Secret Garden is the story of two un...


  5. Lora Lora says:

    This was an uneven book which I still mostly enjoyed reading Most chapters are about individual authors, the big names of childrens lit The rest is inconsistent analysis of past and present Most conclusions I disagreed with, but I was pleased that the author while standing by her own claims, didn t automatically try to trash other viewpoints On the other hand, she regards older standards of literature as having a form of contrivance to them but then ignores thatmodern lit also has its This was an uneven book which I still mostly enjoyed reading Most chapters are about individual authors, the big names of childrens lit The rest is inconsistent analysis of past and present Most conclusions I disagreed with, but I was pleased that the author while standing by her own claims, didn t automatically try to trash other viewpoints On the other hand, she regards older standards of literature as having a form of contrivance to them but then ignores thatmodern lit also has its counter contrivances, as it were In other words, the moral standards of the past were somehow made up and the new lit thank heavens has grown beyon...


  6. Lisa Houlihan Lisa Houlihan says:

    Alison Lurie s collection of essays is entertaining and at times thought provoking, but mostly her analyses were too Freudian for me And inconsistent she says death was absent from children s literature until the 20th century In context, it s possible she meant absent in the first half of that century, but she s not clear and says this just after mentioning Little Women People die left and right in Louisa May Alcott, Frances Hodgson Burnett, L.M Montgomery, and Elizabeth Enright, and even N Alison Lurie s collection of essays is entertaining and at times thought provoking, but mostly her analyses were too Freudian for me And inconsistent she says death was absent from children s literature until the 2...


  7. Dawn Allbee Dawn Allbee says:

    It took a while to get into the book Despite the title each chapter was devotedto a mini biolgraphy of children s author who wrote works that weren t the norm for the times They did talk about the books but at times it seemed the subversive part was a stretch Granted that could be our society has changed quite a bit since some of these novels came out I ll warn you the chapters dedicate...


  8. Jeff Lewonczyk Jeff Lewonczyk says:

    I read this book in pieces over two and a half months, which turned out to be a good strategy for what is essentially a collection of reviews and essays from a span of years Though not written as a single cohesive argument, the presence is that children s literature has a long tradition of embedding values and messages that stand at odds with mainstream culture anti authoritarian thoughts, altered gender roles, etc Lurie introduced me to some interesting new authors I m looking into reading I read this book in pieces over two and a half months, which turned out to be a good strategy for what is essentially a collection of reviews and essays from a span of years Though not written as a single cohesive argument, the presence is that children s liter...


  9. Debby Zigenis-Lowery Debby Zigenis-Lowery says:

    I found the first two thirds of this book fascinating with Lurie s detailed discussion of early authors in the the field of children s literature However, when I hit the chapter on Tolkien and T.H White , I was taken somewhat aback While I love and admire White as Lurie does, I found her discussion of Tolkien shallow and disappointing It seems clear she has not made a close study of Tolkien s writing, and it undercut the trust I had for her discussion of the earlier authors and her basic pr I found the first two thirds of this book fascinating with Lurie s detailed discussion of early authors in the the field of children s literature However, when I hit the chapter on Tolkien and T.H White , I was taken somewhat aback While I love and admire White as Lurie does, I found her discussion of Tolkien shallow and disappointing It seems clear she has not made a close study of Tolkien s writing, and it undercut the trust ...


  10. Jeffrey Jeffrey says:

    Interesting but, as I ve learned about Lurie, full of silly flaws she rebukes Ford Maddox Ford for writing too much because he needed to earn a living but has no problem with Frances Hodgson Burnett for doing the same thing she paints Ruskin as a predator but doesn t tarnish JM Barrie who was much worse in many ways I find her readings often superficial but still there is something worthwhile in her endeavour to bring a serious critical eye to children s literature in pieces mostly written Interesting but, as I ve learned about Lurie, full of silly flaws she rebukes Ford Maddox Ford for writing too much because he needed to earn a living ...


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10 thoughts on “Dont Tell the Grown-Ups

  1. skein skein says:

    Read in one sitting and late into the night because it was SO MCUH FUN, although, yes, uneven, and difficult to follow in places if one hasn t read the original books Children s literature Lurie says runs under the radar, and the authors of children s literature often possess the same attribute, being commonly women they are able to critique the social world, the world of adulthood, in a way that only outsiders can do They are able to get away it because they are only women, and their stori Read in one sitting and late into the night because it was SO MCUH FUN, although, yes, uneven, and difficult to follow in places if one hasn t read the original books Childr...

  2. Katie Katie says:

    Back in the day, this book was subtitled Subversive Children s Literature, which I think isa propos But maybe someone didn t like the double entendre The chapter on The Folklore of Childhood which is in my edition, if not the current one certainly suggests that children are pretty subversive, with their jumprope rhymes about sex and booze, and their pervasive myths about the adult world, and this certainly squares with my own memories pretty well Certainly my own favorite childhoo Back in the day, this book was subtitled Subversive Children s Literature, which I think isa propos But maybe someone didn t like the double entendre The chapter on The Folklore of Childhood which is in my edition, if not the...

  3. Destinee Sutton Destinee Sutton says:

    For me, this book didn t live up to its title Sure, it s kind of about the subversive power of children s literature, but it s actually mostly about the biographies of certain children s authors and how certain children s stories are archetypes for adult literary fiction And it s not a cohesive book at all It s a series of essays that were probably originally intended for lit crit mags When Lurie does address subversiveness, it s usually historical the book was published in 1990, so I did For me, this book didn t live up to its title Sure, it s kind of about the subversive power of children s literature, but it s actually mo...

  4. Amy Amy says:

    My favorite quotation from the book The Secret Garden is the story of two unhappy, sickly, overcivilized children who achieve health and happiness through a combination of communal gardening, mystical faith, daily exercises, encounter group type confrontation, and a health food diet I think this book is mistitled, but I recommend it to people who are interested in Victorian life literature There are some amazing biographical facts about J.M Barrie, John Ruskin and so on There is als My favorite quotation from the book The Secret Garden is the story of two un...

  5. Lora Lora says:

    This was an uneven book which I still mostly enjoyed reading Most chapters are about individual authors, the big names of childrens lit The rest is inconsistent analysis of past and present Most conclusions I disagreed with, but I was pleased that the author while standing by her own claims, didn t automatically try to trash other viewpoints On the other hand, she regards older standards of literature as having a form of contrivance to them but then ignores thatmodern lit also has its This was an uneven book which I still mostly enjoyed reading Most chapters are about individual authors, the big names of childrens lit The rest is inconsistent analysis of past and present Most conclusions I disagreed with, but I was pleased that the author while standing by her own claims, didn t automatically try to trash other viewpoints On the other hand, she regards older standards of literature as having a form of contrivance to them but then ignores thatmodern lit also has its counter contrivances, as it were In other words, the moral standards of the past were somehow made up and the new lit thank heavens has grown beyon...

  6. Lisa Houlihan Lisa Houlihan says:

    Alison Lurie s collection of essays is entertaining and at times thought provoking, but mostly her analyses were too Freudian for me And inconsistent she says death was absent from children s literature until the 20th century In context, it s possible she meant absent in the first half of that century, but she s not clear and says this just after mentioning Little Women People die left and right in Louisa May Alcott, Frances Hodgson Burnett, L.M Montgomery, and Elizabeth Enright, and even N Alison Lurie s collection of essays is entertaining and at times thought provoking, but mostly her analyses were too Freudian for me And inconsistent she says death was absent from children s literature until the 2...

  7. Dawn Allbee Dawn Allbee says:

    It took a while to get into the book Despite the title each chapter was devotedto a mini biolgraphy of children s author who wrote works that weren t the norm for the times They did talk about the books but at times it seemed the subversive part was a stretch Granted that could be our society has changed quite a bit since some of these novels came out I ll warn you the chapters dedicate...

  8. Jeff Lewonczyk Jeff Lewonczyk says:

    I read this book in pieces over two and a half months, which turned out to be a good strategy for what is essentially a collection of reviews and essays from a span of years Though not written as a single cohesive argument, the presence is that children s literature has a long tradition of embedding values and messages that stand at odds with mainstream culture anti authoritarian thoughts, altered gender roles, etc Lurie introduced me to some interesting new authors I m looking into reading I read this book in pieces over two and a half months, which turned out to be a good strategy for what is essentially a collection of reviews and essays from a span of years Though not written as a single cohesive argument, the presence is that children s liter...

  9. Debby Zigenis-Lowery Debby Zigenis-Lowery says:

    I found the first two thirds of this book fascinating with Lurie s detailed discussion of early authors in the the field of children s literature However, when I hit the chapter on Tolkien and T.H White , I was taken somewhat aback While I love and admire White as Lurie does, I found her discussion of Tolkien shallow and disappointing It seems clear she has not made a close study of Tolkien s writing, and it undercut the trust I had for her discussion of the earlier authors and her basic pr I found the first two thirds of this book fascinating with Lurie s detailed discussion of early authors in the the field of children s literature However, when I hit the chapter on Tolkien and T.H White , I was taken somewhat aback While I love and admire White as Lurie does, I found her discussion of Tolkien shallow and disappointing It seems clear she has not made a close study of Tolkien s writing, and it undercut the trust ...

  10. Jeffrey Jeffrey says:

    Interesting but, as I ve learned about Lurie, full of silly flaws she rebukes Ford Maddox Ford for writing too much because he needed to earn a living but has no problem with Frances Hodgson Burnett for doing the same thing she paints Ruskin as a predator but doesn t tarnish JM Barrie who was much worse in many ways I find her readings often superficial but still there is something worthwhile in her endeavour to bring a serious critical eye to children s literature in pieces mostly written Interesting but, as I ve learned about Lurie, full of silly flaws she rebukes Ford Maddox Ford for writing too much because he needed to earn a living ...

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