Generation Left PDF Þ Ebook

Generation Left PDF Þ Ebook


  • ebook
  • 140 pages
  • Generation Left
  • Keir Milburn
  • 07 March 2016
  • 9781509532261

4 thoughts on “Generation Left

  1. Lucy Lucy says:

    Highly astute pithy full of ‘nail on the head’ moments Delicious Optimistic Incisive


  2. Don Don says:

    The entry of people of the millennial generation into political life can be dated to the protests waves which took place in 2011 In the UK these took the form of a mobilisation against student debt involving marches and occupations and at one point an invasion of the Tory party headuarters in central LondonRight wing cynics spout the theory of a ‘snowflake’ generation which was rejecting the call to start behaving like responsible adults Outside this country seen in actions like the occupation of Zuccotti Park in New York and the ‘Indignados’ who took control of Puerto del Sol in Madrid appeared as a delayed reaction to the financial crisis of 2008 and its long aftermath The young in the prosperous developed nations of the world seemed to be declaring a generational war on their parents blaming them for bringing the promise of comfortable middle class lives to a crashing endBut is generational war the right way to characterise the conflict? In this stimulating extended essay on what he calls Generation Left Keir Milburn offers a sophisticated alternative interpretation Hinging on the concept of ‘class composition’ he sets out an analysis which presents capitalism as a system which periodically has to review and change the social processes that bring the working class it needs into existence The system’s move to financialised forms of accumulation in the late 20th century made the extraction of value in the form of rent central reuiring a working class willing to shoulder a greater burden of personal indebtedness to sustain its standard of living Wage growth had been checked back in the 1980s by the state’s successful assault on trade unions; but for a few decades at least the income flows that made it possible to service credit card bills and overdrafts came from the increased value of the homes which working class people were now acuiring through the right to buy scheme By the turn of the millennium this mechanism was no longer performing The glut on new home building severely restricted access for millennials to the asset which their parents had depended on to support their comparatively affluent lifestyles Young people coming into adulthood faced the prospect of being racked not just by the debts loaded onto their credit cards but also exorbitant property rents and the lifetime of repayment needed to service loans taken out as studentsMilburn argues that debt had been one of the most important means to maintain order among the subjects of capital during the post Thatcher decades reuiring the values of the neoliberal world order to be internalised by each individual citizen This might have gone on indefinitely but for the stupendous effects of the credit crisis that hit the world in 2007 08 The austerity that followed allowed a rupture with the ‘common sense’ that sustained the ‘realism’ of the capitalist systemThe essay traces the evolution of the new awareness of exploitation that established itself in minds of millennials The protest movements started to look for ways in which this emerging class consciousness could engage with politics evolving through the forms of ‘Occupy’ and the personal testimony offered the general assemblies being promoted as alternatives to conventional representative democracyThese were all processes to be worked through before the idea took hold that a long established though minority current already in the political mainstream could be seized and made into the means for expressing power This was the Corbyn current that came to have its unexpected day at the helm of the Labour Party The energies of Occupy and general assembly politics poured into initiatives like Momentum and The World Transformed This is an exhilarating account of the new forces in contemporary politics It does not stop at recounting history but points to the challenges of the current moment when Generation Left will have to find the way to mend the breaches with older supporters of versions of left wing politics These failed to renew the commitment to the change they had once advocated A continued engagement on the part of Generation Left with the mainstream probing its obvious weaknesses and coming up with strategies for the alliances that will be needed for the revitalisation of democratic socialism is looked forward to as the conclusion of this important essay


  3. Mauberley Mauberley says:

    An important new look at the formation of recent demographic groupings ie 'generations' as well as the economic behaviours and constraints in which they find themselves forced to live Perhaps surprisingly Milburn draws heavily on an essay by Karl Mannheim 'The Problem of Genrations from a collection entitled 'Essays on the Sociology of Knowledge' published in 1952 Mannheim argues that events rather than calendar dates are the primary factors in forming generations so that the birth years of the so called 'Millennials' 1981 2000 are far less significant than the Great Recession of 2008 09 I finished the book just as the world wide reaction to Covid 19 was exploding and one wonders how the Millennials and the generation that is following will be shaped by this particular disaster


  4. I Read, Therefore I Blog I Read, Therefore I Blog says:

    Keir Milburn is Lecturer in Political Economy and Organisation at Leicester University This book has some interesting ideas about rethinking how we view generations but fails to take into account different issues in different countries heavily relies on sweeping assertions about generations and their opinions makes some rather crass observations and ultimately reads like a left wing fantasy that fails to consider how power is actually won


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Generation Left❮PDF / Epub❯ ✅ Generation Left Author Keir Milburn – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Increasingly age appears to be the key dividing line in contemporary politics Young people across the globe are embracing left wing ideas and supporting figures such as Corbyn and Sanders Where has th Increasingly age appears to be the key dividing line in contemporary politics Young people across the globe are embracing left wing ideas and supporting figures such as Corbyn and Sanders Where has this 'Generation Left' come from How can it change the worldThis compelling book by Keir Milburn traces the story of Generation Left Emerging in the aftermath of the financial crash it has now entered the electoral arena and found itself vying for dominance with ageing right leaning voters and a 'Third Way' political elite unable to accept the new realitiesBy offering a new concept of political generations Milburn unveils the ideas attitudes and direction of Generation Left and explains how the age gap can be bridged by reinventing youth and adulthood This book is essential reading for anyone young or old who is interested in addressing the multiple crises of our time.

4 thoughts on “Generation Left

  1. Lucy Lucy says:

    Highly astute pithy full of ‘nail on the head’ moments Delicious Optimistic Incisive

  2. Don Don says:

    The entry of people of the millennial generation into political life can be dated to the protests waves which took place in 2011 In the UK these took the form of a mobilisation against student debt involving marches and occupations and at one point an invasion of the Tory party headuarters in central LondonRight wing cynics spout the theory of a ‘snowflake’ generation which was rejecting the call to start behaving like responsible adults Outside this country seen in actions like the occupation of Zuccotti Park in New York and the ‘Indignados’ who took control of Puerto del Sol in Madrid appeared as a delayed reaction to the financial crisis of 2008 and its long aftermath The young in the prosperous developed nations of the world seemed to be declaring a generational war on their parents blaming them for bringing the promise of comfortable middle class lives to a crashing endBut is generational war the right way to characterise the conflict? In this stimulating extended essay on what he calls Generation Left Keir Milburn offers a sophisticated alternative interpretation Hinging on the concept of ‘class composition’ he sets out an analysis which presents capitalism as a system which periodically has to review and change the social processes that bring the working class it needs into existence The system’s move to financialised forms of accumulation in the late 20th century made the extraction of value in the form of rent central reuiring a working class willing to shoulder a greater burden of personal indebtedness to sustain its standard of living Wage growth had been checked back in the 1980s by the state’s successful assault on trade unions; but for a few decades at least the income flows that made it possible to service credit card bills and overdrafts came from the increased value of the homes which working class people were now acuiring through the right to buy scheme By the turn of the millennium this mechanism was no longer performing The glut on new home building severely restricted access for millennials to the asset which their parents had depended on to support their comparatively affluent lifestyles Young people coming into adulthood faced the prospect of being racked not just by the debts loaded onto their credit cards but also exorbitant property rents and the lifetime of repayment needed to service loans taken out as studentsMilburn argues that debt had been one of the most important means to maintain order among the subjects of capital during the post Thatcher decades reuiring the values of the neoliberal world order to be internalised by each individual citizen This might have gone on indefinitely but for the stupendous effects of the credit crisis that hit the world in 2007 08 The austerity that followed allowed a rupture with the ‘common sense’ that sustained the ‘realism’ of the capitalist systemThe essay traces the evolution of the new awareness of exploitation that established itself in minds of millennials The protest movements started to look for ways in which this emerging class consciousness could engage with politics evolving through the forms of ‘Occupy’ and the personal testimony offered the general assemblies being promoted as alternatives to conventional representative democracyThese were all processes to be worked through before the idea took hold that a long established though minority current already in the political mainstream could be seized and made into the means for expressing power This was the Corbyn current that came to have its unexpected day at the helm of the Labour Party The energies of Occupy and general assembly politics poured into initiatives like Momentum and The World Transformed This is an exhilarating account of the new forces in contemporary politics It does not stop at recounting history but points to the challenges of the current moment when Generation Left will have to find the way to mend the breaches with older supporters of versions of left wing politics These failed to renew the commitment to the change they had once advocated A continued engagement on the part of Generation Left with the mainstream probing its obvious weaknesses and coming up with strategies for the alliances that will be needed for the revitalisation of democratic socialism is looked forward to as the conclusion of this important essay

  3. Mauberley Mauberley says:

    An important new look at the formation of recent demographic groupings ie 'generations' as well as the economic behaviours and constraints in which they find themselves forced to live Perhaps surprisingly Milburn draws heavily on an essay by Karl Mannheim 'The Problem of Genrations from a collection entitled 'Essays on the Sociology of Knowledge' published in 1952 Mannheim argues that events rather than calendar dates are the primary factors in forming generations so that the birth years of the so called 'Millennials' 1981 2000 are far less significant than the Great Recession of 2008 09 I finished the book just as the world wide reaction to Covid 19 was exploding and one wonders how the Millennials and the generation that is following will be shaped by this particular disaster

  4. I Read, Therefore I Blog I Read, Therefore I Blog says:

    Keir Milburn is Lecturer in Political Economy and Organisation at Leicester University This book has some interesting ideas about rethinking how we view generations but fails to take into account different issues in different countries heavily relies on sweeping assertions about generations and their opinions makes some rather crass observations and ultimately reads like a left wing fantasy that fails to consider how power is actually won

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *