My Parents PDF/EPUB Þ Hardcover

My Parents PDF/EPUB Þ Hardcover


10 thoughts on “My Parents

  1. Toni Toni says:

    'True history is always played out on a personal level'Rtc


  2. Tyler David Tyler David says:

    I recently read a 2002 article by sociologist Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak that describes a humanities education as “an uncoercive rearrangement of desires” Aleksandar Hemon's latest work fulfilled exactly this purpose for me transforming my desire to be entertained into self reflection what can I a product of consumer capitalism learn from those who were raised in another system? How do I balance nostalgia and the striving for a better future with a grounding in the present?Aleksandar Hemon Bosnian American writer and critic tells the story of his parents' immigration from the former Yugoslavia to Canada through a rare analytical lens drawing on decades of observation of his family on two different continents The second part of this work a collection of reflective essays is a disparate yet acceptably curated set of lessons from the mouth of an obvious life long learner Hemon's unpretentious self narratives compassionate analysis and accessible humor all collaborate to lay out entire ecosystems on a single page The reader becomes intimately familiar with his personal obsessions the imprecise nature of memory unreuited love and impending parental death to name a few while flirting with a history that is all to often ignored in American textbooks The final chapters of the best books are the beginnings of a journey and I am humbled to have begun mine with the Hemon family


  3. Toni Toni says:

    Hemon has penned a beautiful and bittersweet ode to his parents rife with humour and honest reflection This story of his parents lives and how they were upended by the war in Bosnia resonated with me for a number of reasons Namely living in Bosnia and seeing so many friends and loved ones whose lives have been marked by the war that broke up the former Yugoslavia Honestly there isn't a single person in my life in Bosnia that doesn't have a story of the war impacting the axis of their life in inalterable ways As Hemon writes It struck me and broke my heart how obvious and brutally simple the evil of war is war takes away lives and never gives them back It transforms people unless they're killers into something they never want to be it diminishes them even when it doesn't kill themHemon's parents were forced to leave their home and move to Canada with nothing to begin a new life at a time when they assumed they would be retiring and enjoying their days in Sarajevo and weekends in the mountains around the city Hemon focuses each chapter on a specific idea music food marriage etc tying them all back to identity and how his parents tried to hang on to theirs while forging ahead in the unknown As child of an immigrant who has gone on to emigrate to another country myself I couldn't help but laugh at times and feel on the verge of tears in others at Hemon's descriptions of the way is his parents clung to old ways in Canada no matter how crazy and laborious it all seemed to their children And never do you not feel Hemon's love and reverence for the people that brought him into and up in the world It's all so lovely really


  4. Craig Barner Craig Barner says:

    Aleksandar Hemon cements his reputation as one the finest writers worldwide with his compelling two part memoir My Parents An Introduction in tandem with This Does Not Belong to You He depicts his Ukrainian descended upbringing in the former Yugoslavian province of Bosnia as a socialist paradise Life as lived and expressed in music food storytelling and dozens of other ways was automatically deep with meaning and pleasureDanger and even evil however shadow Hemon's recollection of the Sarajevo of his youth He looks back on his Bosnia much like Candide does his El Dorado They were utopias where one could not stay whether because of choice in the case of El Dorado or compulsion due to civil war in the case of Sarajevo The lost paradise reaches beyond the externality of war Hemon's penetrating look at Sarajevo suggests it was a paradise with its own internal rot The bullies gangs thugs and perverts in the streets are as reptilian as anything that much larger urban dystopias could throw up The decay gets inside Hemon himself as he expresses with his tongue probably in cheek his admiration for Bosnian thugs The Bosnian for catastrophe katastrofa is a core experience of life Hemon teaches and he seems to believe itThe Yugoslavia of recollection is culturally rich in music food and life in general I found myself underlining Hemon's pronouncements about literature Storytelling is not only not reporting but the opposite of it It is reimagining what happened in a different domain of experiential reality including the past It is the very definition of imagination to shape reshape mold and do whatever it wants with reality as a kind of thought experiment to yield meaning or as a form of play to produce bliss and enjoyment Hemon attributes his bountiful understanding of story not to a university education but his parents His father was an engineer and his travels to Africa Russia western Europe and elsewhere generated a sense of wonder in his son and his family Hemon recalls his wonderment and that of his family as his father tells stories about people and experiences abroad And Hemon credits his mother too for his understanding of story though she rarely ventured outside Sarajevo She recited poetry told jokes bought books and developed a love of the richness of language Indeed Hemon's memoir is almost a lesson in Bosnian because he reprints hundreds of words almost always with English definitions Multiple times Hemon underlines what he contends are the limitations of English usually in jestIt isn't all heaven Hemon writes about the constant threat of beatings on the street in the section of the memoir about his friends adventures in Sarajevo with them and girlfriends He writes about a boy named Zlojutro a name that translates as Evilmorning Hemon says the boy is the closest experience he has had to someone who gets sadistic pleasure from the pain of others Zlojutro targeted Hemon for physical attack and it finally happened in the halls of their school but he wasn't the only tormentor There were others Hemon learns from his father to fight back The boy might get a beating but he'll earn respect and the cessation of hostility It happens as his father predicts but Hemon comes close to bullying himself Indeed the author notes at one point that he beat a boy for what appears to be for no reasonAt a reading I met Hemon detecting a look of angst in his eyes For an instant it appeared to be directed at me a six feet two inch tall man in good shape about the same age as Hemon The fear soon vanished and Hemon played the role of the affable author signing two of his books I had read Yet it is clear where the darkness that pops up in Aleksandar Hemon's stories originated the streets of Sarajevo He cannot go back to the city and he might not want to return his memories recollections and cultural depth notwithstanding The darkness as well as the feast of culture started there


  5. Woodstock Pickett Woodstock Pickett says:

    Uniuely designed and bound the two segments of this book are upside down to each other To read the next you have to turn the book over and begin at the back which after you have made the turn is now the frontThis unusual presentation serves to bind the sections to each other but also to emphasize the separate character of each section Hemon's biography of his parents is lovingly told each chapter focusing on one part of their shared lives their individual biographies their attitudes toward family food occupation music literature and the way all these things were influenced by the former nation of Yugoslavia and by the horrible times of war in BosniaIn the other section of the book Hemon has a series of short essays some of them very short all of them pondering the meaning of memory So much of what he writes is classic young boy adventure not so different from Tom Sawyer But as with his telling of his parents the reader knows the tragedy and grief that lurks just around the cornerHemon is an emigre from Bosnia himself Yet he writes so beautifully and skillfully in English If you haven't read any of his books it's time to start


  6. Barbara Klein Barbara Klein says:

    It was a relief to finally finish this book I am a big fan of Hemon's writing his sentence structure and the power of his narrative but this book dragged It bordered on being self indulgent at times particularly the section about his parents but also his recollections of his boyhood Nothing new here really His parents seemed perfectly ordinary But why do I need to read about them? What does Hemon give us as readers to make us want to know them Not much At some point towards the end of This Does Not Belong to you I realized I was reading disjointed snippets of boyhood memories and realized that my efforts to finish the book felt pointless I'd read these kinds of reveries before in other books with of a compelling story line I did learn one factthat crystallized honey can be warmed up and consumed That organic honey crystallizes naturally and isn't a sign that its gone bad So there was that


  7. Ann Ann says:

    I was expecting so much from this book but it’s dry and downright boring Why the author thinks anyone would be interested in his parents ordinary life is beyond me


  8. Mandy Mandy says:

    This biographyautobiography is divided into two halves The first is the story of Hemon’s parents and their forced flight from Sarajevo to Canada in the 1990s due to the Bosnian War It’s an affectionate insightful and loving account of them and their bravery and resourcefulness in adapting to a new life in a new country is vividly depicted The second half of the book is a rather rambling memoir of Hemon’s own childhood and youth in Sarajevo and an exploration of the nature of memory and remembering I didn’t find this part as engaging and felt it was too disjointed and impressionistic Overall however the book as a whole is enjoyable and interesting and I gained from it an added insight into what life was life in Yugoslavia before everything fell to pieces


  9. Igor Elias Carrasco Igor Elias Carrasco says:

    BeautifulJust beautiful Mr Hemon has a magic with words and thoughts that brought tears to my eyes on many occasions be they of melancholy or joy Highly recommend


  10. AnnMarie AnnMarie says:

    I laughed I cried I loved this bookThe author's dazzling writing about memory blew me awayThe title is interesting specifically because what I’ve learned about memory is we all remember differently How my sister remembers our childhood is different than how I remember it Therefore the title “This Does Not Belong to You Brilliant


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My Parents [Ebook] ➡ My Parents By Aleksandar Hemon – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Two books in one in a flip dosdos format The story of Aleksandar Hemon's parents' immigration from Sarajevo to Canada and a book of short memories of the author's family friends and childhood in Saraj Two books in one in a flip dosdos format The story of Aleksandar Hemon's parents' immigration from Sarajevo to Canada and a book of short memories of the author's family friends and childhood in SarajevoIn My Parents Aleksandar Hemon tells the story of his parents' immigration to Canada of the lives that were upended by the war in Bosnia and siege of Sarajevo and the new lives his parents were forced to build As ever with his work he portrays both the perfect intimate details his mother's lonely upbringing his father's fanatical beekeeping and a sweeping heartbreaking history of his native country It is a story full of many Hemons of course his parents sister uncles cousins and also of German occupying forces Yugoslav partisans royalist Serb collaborators singing Ukrainians and a few befuddled Canadians My Parents is Hemon at his very best grounded in stories lovingly polished by retelling but making them exhilarating and fresh in writing summoning unexpected laughs in the midst of the heartbreaking narratives This Does Not Belong to You meanwhile is the exhilarating freewheeling unabashedly personal companion to My Parents a perfect dose of Hemon at his most dazzling and untempered in a series of beautifully distilled memories and observations and explosive hilarious poignant miniatures Presented dosdos with My Parents it complements and completes a major work from a major writerIn the words of Colum McCann Aleksandar Hemon is uite frankly the greatest writer of our generation Hemon has never been better than here in these pages And the moment has never been ready for his voice nor has the world ever been in need of it.

  • Hardcover
  • 368 pages
  • My Parents
  • Aleksandar Hemon
  • 09 September 2016
  • 9780374217433

About the Author: Aleksandar Hemon

Hemon graduated from the University of Sarajevo with a degree in literature in He moved to Chicago Illinois in and found that he was unable to write in Bosnian and spoke little English In he started writing works in English and managed to showcase his work in prestigious magazines such as the New Yorker and Esuire He is the author of The Lazarus Project which was a finalist f.


10 thoughts on “My Parents

  1. Toni Toni says:

    'True history is always played out on a personal level'Rtc

  2. Tyler David Tyler David says:

    I recently read a 2002 article by sociologist Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak that describes a humanities education as “an uncoercive rearrangement of desires” Aleksandar Hemon's latest work fulfilled exactly this purpose for me transforming my desire to be entertained into self reflection what can I a product of consumer capitalism learn from those who were raised in another system? How do I balance nostalgia and the striving for a better future with a grounding in the present?Aleksandar Hemon Bosnian American writer and critic tells the story of his parents' immigration from the former Yugoslavia to Canada through a rare analytical lens drawing on decades of observation of his family on two different continents The second part of this work a collection of reflective essays is a disparate yet acceptably curated set of lessons from the mouth of an obvious life long learner Hemon's unpretentious self narratives compassionate analysis and accessible humor all collaborate to lay out entire ecosystems on a single page The reader becomes intimately familiar with his personal obsessions the imprecise nature of memory unreuited love and impending parental death to name a few while flirting with a history that is all to often ignored in American textbooks The final chapters of the best books are the beginnings of a journey and I am humbled to have begun mine with the Hemon family

  3. Toni Toni says:

    Hemon has penned a beautiful and bittersweet ode to his parents rife with humour and honest reflection This story of his parents lives and how they were upended by the war in Bosnia resonated with me for a number of reasons Namely living in Bosnia and seeing so many friends and loved ones whose lives have been marked by the war that broke up the former Yugoslavia Honestly there isn't a single person in my life in Bosnia that doesn't have a story of the war impacting the axis of their life in inalterable ways As Hemon writes It struck me and broke my heart how obvious and brutally simple the evil of war is war takes away lives and never gives them back It transforms people unless they're killers into something they never want to be it diminishes them even when it doesn't kill themHemon's parents were forced to leave their home and move to Canada with nothing to begin a new life at a time when they assumed they would be retiring and enjoying their days in Sarajevo and weekends in the mountains around the city Hemon focuses each chapter on a specific idea music food marriage etc tying them all back to identity and how his parents tried to hang on to theirs while forging ahead in the unknown As child of an immigrant who has gone on to emigrate to another country myself I couldn't help but laugh at times and feel on the verge of tears in others at Hemon's descriptions of the way is his parents clung to old ways in Canada no matter how crazy and laborious it all seemed to their children And never do you not feel Hemon's love and reverence for the people that brought him into and up in the world It's all so lovely really

  4. Craig Barner Craig Barner says:

    Aleksandar Hemon cements his reputation as one the finest writers worldwide with his compelling two part memoir My Parents An Introduction in tandem with This Does Not Belong to You He depicts his Ukrainian descended upbringing in the former Yugoslavian province of Bosnia as a socialist paradise Life as lived and expressed in music food storytelling and dozens of other ways was automatically deep with meaning and pleasureDanger and even evil however shadow Hemon's recollection of the Sarajevo of his youth He looks back on his Bosnia much like Candide does his El Dorado They were utopias where one could not stay whether because of choice in the case of El Dorado or compulsion due to civil war in the case of Sarajevo The lost paradise reaches beyond the externality of war Hemon's penetrating look at Sarajevo suggests it was a paradise with its own internal rot The bullies gangs thugs and perverts in the streets are as reptilian as anything that much larger urban dystopias could throw up The decay gets inside Hemon himself as he expresses with his tongue probably in cheek his admiration for Bosnian thugs The Bosnian for catastrophe katastrofa is a core experience of life Hemon teaches and he seems to believe itThe Yugoslavia of recollection is culturally rich in music food and life in general I found myself underlining Hemon's pronouncements about literature Storytelling is not only not reporting but the opposite of it It is reimagining what happened in a different domain of experiential reality including the past It is the very definition of imagination to shape reshape mold and do whatever it wants with reality as a kind of thought experiment to yield meaning or as a form of play to produce bliss and enjoyment Hemon attributes his bountiful understanding of story not to a university education but his parents His father was an engineer and his travels to Africa Russia western Europe and elsewhere generated a sense of wonder in his son and his family Hemon recalls his wonderment and that of his family as his father tells stories about people and experiences abroad And Hemon credits his mother too for his understanding of story though she rarely ventured outside Sarajevo She recited poetry told jokes bought books and developed a love of the richness of language Indeed Hemon's memoir is almost a lesson in Bosnian because he reprints hundreds of words almost always with English definitions Multiple times Hemon underlines what he contends are the limitations of English usually in jestIt isn't all heaven Hemon writes about the constant threat of beatings on the street in the section of the memoir about his friends adventures in Sarajevo with them and girlfriends He writes about a boy named Zlojutro a name that translates as Evilmorning Hemon says the boy is the closest experience he has had to someone who gets sadistic pleasure from the pain of others Zlojutro targeted Hemon for physical attack and it finally happened in the halls of their school but he wasn't the only tormentor There were others Hemon learns from his father to fight back The boy might get a beating but he'll earn respect and the cessation of hostility It happens as his father predicts but Hemon comes close to bullying himself Indeed the author notes at one point that he beat a boy for what appears to be for no reasonAt a reading I met Hemon detecting a look of angst in his eyes For an instant it appeared to be directed at me a six feet two inch tall man in good shape about the same age as Hemon The fear soon vanished and Hemon played the role of the affable author signing two of his books I had read Yet it is clear where the darkness that pops up in Aleksandar Hemon's stories originated the streets of Sarajevo He cannot go back to the city and he might not want to return his memories recollections and cultural depth notwithstanding The darkness as well as the feast of culture started there

  5. Woodstock Pickett Woodstock Pickett says:

    Uniuely designed and bound the two segments of this book are upside down to each other To read the next you have to turn the book over and begin at the back which after you have made the turn is now the frontThis unusual presentation serves to bind the sections to each other but also to emphasize the separate character of each section Hemon's biography of his parents is lovingly told each chapter focusing on one part of their shared lives their individual biographies their attitudes toward family food occupation music literature and the way all these things were influenced by the former nation of Yugoslavia and by the horrible times of war in BosniaIn the other section of the book Hemon has a series of short essays some of them very short all of them pondering the meaning of memory So much of what he writes is classic young boy adventure not so different from Tom Sawyer But as with his telling of his parents the reader knows the tragedy and grief that lurks just around the cornerHemon is an emigre from Bosnia himself Yet he writes so beautifully and skillfully in English If you haven't read any of his books it's time to start

  6. Barbara Klein Barbara Klein says:

    It was a relief to finally finish this book I am a big fan of Hemon's writing his sentence structure and the power of his narrative but this book dragged It bordered on being self indulgent at times particularly the section about his parents but also his recollections of his boyhood Nothing new here really His parents seemed perfectly ordinary But why do I need to read about them? What does Hemon give us as readers to make us want to know them Not much At some point towards the end of This Does Not Belong to you I realized I was reading disjointed snippets of boyhood memories and realized that my efforts to finish the book felt pointless I'd read these kinds of reveries before in other books with of a compelling story line I did learn one factthat crystallized honey can be warmed up and consumed That organic honey crystallizes naturally and isn't a sign that its gone bad So there was that

  7. Ann Ann says:

    I was expecting so much from this book but it’s dry and downright boring Why the author thinks anyone would be interested in his parents ordinary life is beyond me

  8. Mandy Mandy says:

    This biographyautobiography is divided into two halves The first is the story of Hemon’s parents and their forced flight from Sarajevo to Canada in the 1990s due to the Bosnian War It’s an affectionate insightful and loving account of them and their bravery and resourcefulness in adapting to a new life in a new country is vividly depicted The second half of the book is a rather rambling memoir of Hemon’s own childhood and youth in Sarajevo and an exploration of the nature of memory and remembering I didn’t find this part as engaging and felt it was too disjointed and impressionistic Overall however the book as a whole is enjoyable and interesting and I gained from it an added insight into what life was life in Yugoslavia before everything fell to pieces

  9. Igor Elias Carrasco Igor Elias Carrasco says:

    BeautifulJust beautiful Mr Hemon has a magic with words and thoughts that brought tears to my eyes on many occasions be they of melancholy or joy Highly recommend

  10. AnnMarie AnnMarie says:

    I laughed I cried I loved this bookThe author's dazzling writing about memory blew me awayThe title is interesting specifically because what I’ve learned about memory is we all remember differently How my sister remembers our childhood is different than how I remember it Therefore the title “This Does Not Belong to You Brilliant

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *