Paperback ï Dottoressa PDF Þ

Paperback ï Dottoressa PDF Þ


Dottoressa ❮PDF / Epub❯ ☉ Dottoressa ✩ Author Susan Levenstein – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Wise and witty Publishers WeeklyA charming story well told Kirkus ReviewsSmart funny charming full of astute insights into the way Italy works Alexander StilleA wonderfully fun read Dr Robert Sapolsky Wise and witty Publishers WeeklyA charming story well told Kirkus ReviewsSmart funny charming full of astute insights into the way Italy works Alexander StilleA wonderfully fun read Dr Robert SapolskyAs funny as it is poignant A must read for anyone who thinks they understand medicine Italy or humanity Barbie Latza NadeauAfter completing her medical training in New York Susan Levenstein set off for a one year adventure in Rome Forty years later she is still practicing medicine in the Eternal City In Dottoressa An American Doctor in Rome Levenstein writes with love and exasperation about navigating her career through the renowned Italian tangle of brilliance and ineptitude sexism and tolerance rigidity and chaosPart memoir starting with her epic uest for an Italian medical license and part portrait of Italy from a uniue point of view Dottoressa is packed with vignettes that illuminate the national differences in character lifestyle health and health care between her two countries Levenstein who has been called the wittiest internist on earth covers everything from hookup culture to neighborhood madmen Italian hands off medical training bidets the ironies of expatriation and why Italians always pay their doctor's bills.


10 thoughts on “Dottoressa

  1. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    In the late 1970s Levenstein moved from New York City to Rome with her Italian husband and set up a private medical practice catering to English speaking expatriates Her light hearted yet trenchant memoir highlights the myriad contrasts between the United States and Italy revealed by their health care systems Italy has a generous national health service but it is perennially underfunded and plagued by corruption and inefficiency The tone is conversational and even handed In the pandemic aftermath though Italian sloppiness and shortages no longer seem like harmless matters to shake one’s head over My full review was in the June 19th issue of the Times Literary Supplement It is also available online


  2. Mary Ruth Mary Ruth says:

    A lot of good stories crammed in here but could use some organization


  3. Jane Jane says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed this memoiressay collection Levenstein is an exceptional writer with an impressive edge of acerbic wit I found the glimpse of medical practice Italian style terrifically interesting as well as compelling when compared to its American version


  4. Mark Cohen Mark Cohen says:

    I write this review as a fellow physician The physician’s journal has its roots in antiuity Often records of unusual patient presentations were recorded for didactic purposes We are fortunate that the author seems to have maintained a personal journal also collected from various pieces of paper as needed from an early age recording not only happenings in her life but her reactions to them at the timeThe intermingling of her physician and personal life roles is told in the manner of narrative story telling We learn about her adventurous spirit openness to new ideas and other ways of thinking as her story unfolds A taste of the writing found in her tale of two cities New York Rome occurs as she contemplates moving to the country she has chosen to adopt “I was ready to leave all uncertainties behind and begin a joyful adventure in chaos”Her memoir weaves between combinations of and conflicts between art and science and mind and body her worries and insecurities A sensitive reader will find that shehe can readily identify with the authorThere is an old physician adage that goes something like this “Listen to the patient and they will tell you what you need to know” Dr Levenstein is not only a good listener She has been able to teach us how she reasons thinks and works with her patients towards the best outcomeThrough the book there is this pull between her and her country of origin and her adopted country If only she could have the best of both worlds And I believe that she just might have She expresses this in several ways but my favorite regards the comparison of our medical systems“Health heaven the funding hospitals and doctors’ education are American the lifestyle and access to care Italian Health hell Italian budgets medical training and ICUs; American pricing coverage Big Macs drunk driving weapons mania couch potatodom and streetcorner opiates”This is definitely an enjoyable and educational read


  5. Abigail Abigail says:

    As a US — Italy expat myself reading this book was extremely relatable and entertaining and it offers a very insightful look into the “true” state of affairs regarding Italian medicine It will help people of any nationality make sense of the way that things are done in Italy and adjust their expectations accordingly When I was reading this I was struck with many “oh so that’s why I’ve been so frustrated with doctors here” or “oh so that’s why my ER experiences here have been akin to the ninth circle of hell” moments Thankfully though after reading this book I have a much better understanding of how things work here and I feel prepared to navigate this complex system Even if the thought of another Italian ER visit makes me seriously wonder whether or not I’d make it out alive I suppose it’s a small risk to take for living in the country of my dreams


  6. Suzanne Suzanne says:

    This is a very personal account of Levenstein's experiences as an American trained doctor practising in Rome It is an absorbing account often amusing sometimes disturbing but always easy to read Significant differences between the American and Italian health services are revealed and despite its shortcomings Levenstein does not regret having worked under the Italian system albeit as a private practitioner Reading as a potential patient I was struck by the hit and miss nature of much medical treatment as described by the Dottoressa Lives are unexpectedly saved but mistakes also result in undeserved pain and suffering It certainly contributed to increasing my wariness about any contact with the medical profession


  7. Sarah Johnson Sarah Johnson says:

    As an American in Italy for the better part of a decade reading this book seriously put together the puzzle of my experiences with the Italian health care system Sometimes it's great and amazing and wonderful and free Othertimes you exit out of the weird dark unorganized hospital into the sun and just can't make heads or tails of the left field diagnoses and wackadoo conversations you had within Loved every bit of this book 1010


  8. Jeanette Nardi Jeanette Nardi says:

    Book is not only informative but very entertaining It touched me emotionally as well as making me laugh Reading it was the highlight of my dayI would recommend this book to all my expat friends living in Italy as well as my American friends who wished they were


  9. Debbie Cohen Debbie Cohen says:

    Grab a glass of wine commit to the Mediterranean diet and settle in for a funny and educational doctoring adventure You don't need to be a doctor patient or live in Rome to become enlightened by this book


  10. Gillian Gillian says:

    I enjoyed this tale of the expatemigrate experience in Rome through the lens of practicing medicine


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10 thoughts on “Dottoressa

  1. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    In the late 1970s Levenstein moved from New York City to Rome with her Italian husband and set up a private medical practice catering to English speaking expatriates Her light hearted yet trenchant memoir highlights the myriad contrasts between the United States and Italy revealed by their health care systems Italy has a generous national health service but it is perennially underfunded and plagued by corruption and inefficiency The tone is conversational and even handed In the pandemic aftermath though Italian sloppiness and shortages no longer seem like harmless matters to shake one’s head over My full review was in the June 19th issue of the Times Literary Supplement It is also available online

  2. Mary Ruth Mary Ruth says:

    A lot of good stories crammed in here but could use some organization

  3. Jane Jane says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed this memoiressay collection Levenstein is an exceptional writer with an impressive edge of acerbic wit I found the glimpse of medical practice Italian style terrifically interesting as well as compelling when compared to its American version

  4. Mark Cohen Mark Cohen says:

    I write this review as a fellow physician The physician’s journal has its roots in antiuity Often records of unusual patient presentations were recorded for didactic purposes We are fortunate that the author seems to have maintained a personal journal also collected from various pieces of paper as needed from an early age recording not only happenings in her life but her reactions to them at the timeThe intermingling of her physician and personal life roles is told in the manner of narrative story telling We learn about her adventurous spirit openness to new ideas and other ways of thinking as her story unfolds A taste of the writing found in her tale of two cities New York Rome occurs as she contemplates moving to the country she has chosen to adopt “I was ready to leave all uncertainties behind and begin a joyful adventure in chaos”Her memoir weaves between combinations of and conflicts between art and science and mind and body her worries and insecurities A sensitive reader will find that shehe can readily identify with the authorThere is an old physician adage that goes something like this “Listen to the patient and they will tell you what you need to know” Dr Levenstein is not only a good listener She has been able to teach us how she reasons thinks and works with her patients towards the best outcomeThrough the book there is this pull between her and her country of origin and her adopted country If only she could have the best of both worlds And I believe that she just might have She expresses this in several ways but my favorite regards the comparison of our medical systems“Health heaven the funding hospitals and doctors’ education are American the lifestyle and access to care Italian Health hell Italian budgets medical training and ICUs; American pricing coverage Big Macs drunk driving weapons mania couch potatodom and streetcorner opiates”This is definitely an enjoyable and educational read

  5. Abigail Abigail says:

    As a US — Italy expat myself reading this book was extremely relatable and entertaining and it offers a very insightful look into the “true” state of affairs regarding Italian medicine It will help people of any nationality make sense of the way that things are done in Italy and adjust their expectations accordingly When I was reading this I was struck with many “oh so that’s why I’ve been so frustrated with doctors here” or “oh so that’s why my ER experiences here have been akin to the ninth circle of hell” moments Thankfully though after reading this book I have a much better understanding of how things work here and I feel prepared to navigate this complex system Even if the thought of another Italian ER visit makes me seriously wonder whether or not I’d make it out alive I suppose it’s a small risk to take for living in the country of my dreams

  6. Suzanne Suzanne says:

    This is a very personal account of Levenstein's experiences as an American trained doctor practising in Rome It is an absorbing account often amusing sometimes disturbing but always easy to read Significant differences between the American and Italian health services are revealed and despite its shortcomings Levenstein does not regret having worked under the Italian system albeit as a private practitioner Reading as a potential patient I was struck by the hit and miss nature of much medical treatment as described by the Dottoressa Lives are unexpectedly saved but mistakes also result in undeserved pain and suffering It certainly contributed to increasing my wariness about any contact with the medical profession

  7. Sarah Johnson Sarah Johnson says:

    As an American in Italy for the better part of a decade reading this book seriously put together the puzzle of my experiences with the Italian health care system Sometimes it's great and amazing and wonderful and free Othertimes you exit out of the weird dark unorganized hospital into the sun and just can't make heads or tails of the left field diagnoses and wackadoo conversations you had within Loved every bit of this book 1010

  8. Jeanette Nardi Jeanette Nardi says:

    Book is not only informative but very entertaining It touched me emotionally as well as making me laugh Reading it was the highlight of my dayI would recommend this book to all my expat friends living in Italy as well as my American friends who wished they were

  9. Debbie Cohen Debbie Cohen says:

    Grab a glass of wine commit to the Mediterranean diet and settle in for a funny and educational doctoring adventure You don't need to be a doctor patient or live in Rome to become enlightened by this book

  10. Gillian Gillian says:

    I enjoyed this tale of the expatemigrate experience in Rome through the lens of practicing medicine

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *