Paperback ↠ Menschliches, Allzumenschliches ePUB Þ

Paperback ↠ Menschliches, Allzumenschliches ePUB Þ



10 thoughts on “Menschliches, Allzumenschliches

  1. Glenn Russell Glenn Russell says:



    There are many generalizations and sweeping judgments made about Nietzsche and his philosophy. I find such remarks next to useless. For me, there is only one way to approach Nietzsche – read each paragraph and maxim and aphorism slowly and carefully and arrive at my own conclusions after seeing how his words apply to my own life. As by way of example, below are several of his shorter aphorisms from this book coupled with my comments.

    “FROM CANNIBAL COUNTRY – In solitude the lonely man is eaten up by himself, among crowds by the many. Choose which you prefer.” ---------------- I’ve spent many hours in solitude, sometimes days or even weeks at a time. For me, solitude is pure gold: to live within, to mediate, to relax into the core of one’s body and inner light is most refreshing, a sheer joy, anything but an experience of being lonely. Matter of fact, any feelings of loneliness quickly poisons one’s solitude. If you feel lonely, perhaps it’s time to slow down and take a serious account of your life.

    “AGAINST THE DISPARAGERS OF BREVITY – A brief dictum may be the fruit and harvest of long reflection. The reader, however, who is a novice in this field and has never considered the case in point, sees something embryonic in all brief dicta, not without a reproachful hint to the author, requesting him not to serve up such raw and ill-prepared food.” ---------------- I enjoy 800 page novels but I also enjoy reading aphorisms. The shorter, the better. Sometimes, one, two or three sentences is all that’s needed to spark probing reflection and sincere consideration.

    “DEBAUCHERY – Not joy but joylessness is the mother of debauchery.” --------------- I recall college drinking parties with lots and lots of beer and hard liquor, where everyone drank themselves into numbness and a drunken stupor. Those memories are like a distant bad dream. Fortunately, it only took a party or two for me to realize that wasn’t my scene. I started practicing yoga and meditation and have had the good fortune to experience great joy for many years as a direct result of this practice.

    “KNOWING HOW TO WASH ONESELF CLEAN – We must know how to emerge cleaner from unclean conditions, and, if necessary, how to wash ourselves even with dirty water.” ---------------When I encounter ugliness, whether in people or in my surroundings, I try to use such ugliness as a sting, a reminder to cherish experiences of kindness and beauty.

    “THE FARCE OF MANY INDUSTRIOUS PERSONS - By an excess of effort they win leisure for themselves, and then they can do nothing with it but count the hours until the tale is ended.” -------------------- I recall Joseph Campbell relating how many workaholics and professionals spend many years climbing the ladder but when they get to the top they realize they are leaning against the wrong wall. From my own experience, I’ve had a couple professional careers but I’ve always enjoyed weekends more than weekdays. I think Nietzsche hits the bulls-eye here: If you are at a loss when you spend time away from your work-a-day world, ask yourself if you are really living life from your own creative and spiritual depth.

    “SIGNS FROM DREAMS - What one sometimes does not know and feel accurately in waking hours whether one has a good or a bad conscience as regards some person is revealed completely and unambiguously by dreams.” --------------------- I just finished ‘The Kindly Ones’ by Jonathan Littell where the main character recalls his life as a Nazi SS officer when he had a series of vivid, horrific, hellish dreams. However, he refused to listen carefully to what he dreams were telling him; if he did, he probably wouldn’t have continued to engage in twisted, perverted practices and a number of senseless murders. For myself, for years I’ve kept a dream journal and practiced lucid dreaming. Most fruitful for self-discovery.

    Since this is a review of one of Nietzsche’s books, Nietzsche gets the last word. And since we are all readers of books here, I thought this maxim most appropriate:
    “A GOOD BOOK NEEDS TIME – Every good book tastes bitter when it first comes out, for it has the defect of newness. Moreover, it suffers damage from its living author, if he is well known and much talked about. For all the world is accustomed to confuse the author with his work. Whatever of profundity, sweetness, and brilliance the work may contain must be developed as the years go by, under the case of growing, then old, and lastly traditional reverence. Many hours must pass, many a spider must have woven its web about the book. A book is made better by good readers and clearer by good opponents.”


  2. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    Menschliches, Allzumenschliches = Human, All Too Human, Friedrich Nietzsche

    Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits is a book by 19th-century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, originally published in 1878. A second part, Assorted Opinions and Maxims, was published in 1879, and a third part, The Wanderer and his Shadow, followed in 1880.

    The book is Nietzsche's first in the aphoristic style that would come to dominate his writings, discussing a variety of concepts in short paragraphs or sayings.

    Human, All Too Human “to the memory of Voltaire on the celebration of the anniversary of his death, May 30, 1778.” Instead of a preface, the first part originally included a quotation from Descartes's Discourse on the Method.

    Nietzsche later republished all three parts as a two-volume edition in 1886, adding a preface to each volume, and removing the Descartes quote as well as the dedication to Voltaire.

    تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز چهاردهم ماه جولای سال 2006 میلادی

    عنوان: انسانی، زیاده انسانی؛ نویسنده: ف‍ری‍دری‍ش وی‍ل‍ه‍ل‍م ن‍ی‍چ‍ه؛ مترجمین: ابوتراب سهراب؛ محمد محقق نیشابوری؛ تهران، نشر مرکز، 1384؛ در 476ص؛ چاپ دوم 1385؛ چاپ سوم 1387؛ شابک 9789643058476؛ چاپ چهارم 1389؛ چاپ پنجم: 1391؛ چاپ ششم 1393؛ موضوع انسان - از نویسندگان آلمانی سده 19میلادی

    عنوان: انسانی، زیاده انسانی؛ نویسنده: ف‍ری‍دری‍ش وی‍ل‍ه‍ل‍م ن‍ی‍چ‍ه؛ مترجم: عباس کاشف؛ تهران، نشر فرزان روز؛ 1395، در 470ص؛ شابک 9789643214036؛

    انسانی، زیاده انسانی (سال 1878میلادی)؛ با سبکی ویژه، دارای «ششصدوسی و هشت» گزینگویه، دومین اثر «نیچه»، پس از کتاب «زایش تراژدی از روح موسیقی، سال 1872میلادی» است؛ «زایش تراژدی» نخستین کتاب ایشان بود، که در باب «فیلولوژی نظری» منتشر شد؛ در آن برهه، «نیچه» استاد سی و سه ساله ی «فیلولوژی کلاسیک»، در دانشگاه «بال» بودند، که پس از نگارش «انسانی، زیاده انسانی»، رسماً از آن سمت استعفا کردند؛

    به گویش خود نیچه: «انسانی، زیاده انسانی یادآور یک تنش است»> تنشی که از سویی، زاییده ی دوره ی بیماری «نیچه»، و از دیگر سو، بیانگر دگراندیشی ایشانست؛

    میتوان گفت: این کتاب سند گویایی از «نیچه»ی فیلولوژیست، و منتقد فرهنگی، به سوی «نیچه»ی فیلسوف، و نگارگر است؛ یعنی همان «نیچه»ای که امروز همگان میشناسند؛ بیشتر آثار «نیچه»، دستاورد همین دوره ی دوم اندیشه ورزی ایشانست؛

    آثاری همچون: «آنک انسان (سال 1888میلادی)»، «چنین گفت زرتشت»، «فراسوی خیر و شر»، «پگاه»، «شامگاه بتان»، در این دوره ی تنش در «نیچه» آغاز شد، ولی تنش هماره خبر از تنشهای بزرگی میداد، که «نیچه»، فرهنگ و تمدن را، در حال گذار و رهسپاری به آنسوی میدید؛ همان تنشی که «نیچه» آنرا «مرگ خدا» مینامید؛ کتاب «انسانی، زیاده انسانی»، افشاگر چالشهایی ست، که «نیچه» در آنها گرفتار بود

    ا. شربیانی


  3. Bradley Bradley says:

    Probably my favorite book by Nietzsche excluding Thus Spoke Zarathustra. If you love aphorisms that pack a punch then this will be right up your alley. Not a laborious read like some treatise philosophy, but witty, controversial, eloquent, and brutally honest.
    My favorite aphorism - Life consists of rare individual moments of the highest significance and countless intervals in which at best the phantoms of those moments hover over us. Love, spring, a beautiful melody, the mountains, the moon, the sea - they speak truly to our heart only once: if they ever do in fact find speech. For many people never experience these moments at all but are themselves intervals and pauses in the symphony of real life. (#586) So beautiful! Should be studied alongside Shakespeare. Breathtaking.


  4. Jason Jason says:

    The Nietzsche of his middle period is, in my view, the best, before his mental breakdown. There is less of the crazed polemic in this work than, say, in Ecce Homo, Zarathustra, or Twilight of the Idols, although Nietzsche, being Nietzsche, never takes prisoners in his attacks. Still, there is a good deal of thoughtful reflection on philosophy, culture, religion, family, and marriage that are worth considering.


  5. Rachel Rachel says:

    Though I really enjoyed this book and love studying the works of Nietzsche, Sartre, and others, I'm reminded of a quote recently use on the Daily Show: I was once a college sophomore, too.

    Quoting this book or carrying it around with you on the bus on your way to work doesn't necessarily transform you into someone with deep, cutting insight into our existentialist situation...nor does it make you the overman. Remember: We all took the same PHIL 101 classes;)


  6. Teacherhuman Teacherhuman says:

    I am still not certain it is really possible in this culture to become--or perhaps remain a free spirit. In the oppressive expectations of a world that requires conformity for sustinence may well be a kind of caging we may never escape. We must be always worried our expression of spirit is too unleashed, too sexual, too ethnic, too loud, too inspired--too free for everyone who is not. Nothing scarier than someone who is who and what she (or he) is with no apologies for it to those who are uncomfortable in their own skins.
    Still Nietzsche's treatise is on my must read list for all who wish to be truly human.


  7. Lady Jane Lady Jane says:

    Allegedly, Nietzsche wrote this piece after he broke his friendship with Wagner, the musician Nietzsche formerly idolized; soon after he began to break away from his fondness for the romanticism of music and art. This shift in attitude is strongly conveyed in this amazing work, Human, All Too Human. As Marion Faber writes in the introduction, Judging from its sour title, it would certainly be a book which differed from its visionary and utopian predecessors. 'Human, all too human' is kind of a sigh in the face of the intractability of the human material to the projects of human sublimity. Indeed, it is neither a critical judgment of nature nor a defense; it is simply a forthright and unaffected analysis of the human condition and through the ages and stages under various passions and conditions.

    “Human, All Too Human” is a collection of 638 aphorisms divided into nine categories in which Nietzsche reveals his observations of human nature and exposes common misunderstandings humans have regarding philosophy, religion, art, morality, society, relationships, men and women.

    The book is divided into nine sections: 1) Of First and Last Things, which deals primarily with ontology, epistemology, and miscellaneous metaphysical concepts. 2) On the History of Moral Feelings, in which the author analyses the emotions and conditions that lead to the inventions and vacillations of morals and man-made rules in the social contract. 3) Religious Life, in which he describes the different mental states and emotions revolving the human predisposition to inventing deities. 4) From the Soul of Artists and Writers, in which he cynically critiques the so-called primitive euphoric states that artists and lovers of the arts undergo in this realm. 5) Signs of Higher and Lower Culture, in which he defines and speculates on the two. 6) Man In Society, in which he conducts further speculation of man in the social contract. 7) Woman and Child, which is a collection of aphorisms that relate to the subject of relationships, marriage, and progeny. 8) A Look At The State, in which Nietzsche describes his views on politics and power. Last but not least, 9) Man Alone With Himself, in which he meditates and exposes man’s nature as an individual.

    One of my favorite parts of the book is found in the first section and it is passage number two. In this passage, Nietzsche states that the congenital defect of the philosopher is a lack of historical sense. Nietzsche states that “Everything the philosopher asserts is basically no more than a statement about man within a very limited time span…. They will not understand that man has evolved, that the faculty of knowledge has also evolved, while some of them even permit themselves to spin the whole world from out of this faculty of knowledge…. The philosopher sees ‘insticts’ in present-day man, and assumes that they belong to the unchangeable facts of human nature, that they can, to that extent, provide a key to the understanding of the world in general. This entire teleology is predicated on the ability to speak about man of the last four thousand years as if he were eternal, the natural direction of all things in the world from the beginning. But everything has evolved; there are no eternal facts, nor are there any absolute truths. Thus historical philosophizing is necessary henceforth, and the virtue of modesty as well.” This is very significant not only to the entire branch of metaphysics, but also as an introduction to the book because Nietzsche admits that in the human condition that he has in common with the rest of us, even the most seemingly insightful speculations are based only on what we can see of the iceberg—namely, only about as far back as four thousand years from which we have found some evidence. The rest of our history is merely suspicion and nobody can possibly ascertain what the behaviors and thoughts were back then. Worse even, that most people do not even study the history that is available to us, and judge everything based on the even shorter time span that they know--- which can be a couple of centuries, or not even that; the simple-minded unread judge only by their own time period. In conclusion to this realization, one must accept that there are no absolute truths, for the “truths” do not last more than a few centuries, at most. They always change along with human whim and evolution of the mind and taste.

    One of my favorite sections is the last one, Man Alone With Himself, because Nietzsche provides insightful musings on the natural state of the individual and his motives, psychology, etc. Some of my favorite passages are as follows:

    483

    Enemies of truth: Convictions are more dangerous enemies of truth than lies.


    484

    Topsy turvy world: We criticize a thinker more sharply when he proposes a tenet that disagreeable to us; and yet it would be more reasonable to do this when we find his tenet agreeable.


    489

    Not too deep: People who comprehend a matter in all its depth seldom remain true to it forever. For they have brought its depths to the light; and then there is always much to see about it that is bad.

    490

    Idealists' delusion: All idealists imagine that the causes they serve are significantly better than the other causes in the world; they do not want to believe that if their cause is to flourish at all, it needs exactly the same foul-smelling manure that all other human undertakings require.

    492

    The right profession: Men seldom endure a profession if they do not believe or persuade themselves that it is basically more important than all others. Women do the same with their lovers.

    509

    Everyone superior in one thing: In civilized circumstances, everyone feels superior to everyone else in at least one way; this is the basis of the general goodwill, inasmuch as everyone is someone who, under certain conditions, can be of help, and need therefore feel no shame in allowing himself to be helped.

    537

    Value of a profession: A profession makes us thoughtless: therein lies its greatest blessing. For it is a bulwark, behind which we are allowed to withdraw when qualms and worries of a general kind attack us.

    599

    The age of arrogance: The true period of arrogance for talented men comes between their twenty-sixth and thirtieth year; it is the time of first ripeness, with a good bit of sourness still remaining. On the basis of what one feels inside himself, one demands from other people, who see little or nothing of it, respect and humility; and because these are not at first forthcoming, one takes vengeance with a glance, an arrogant gesture, or a tone of voice. This a fine ear and eye will recognize in all the products of those years, be their poems, philosophies, or paintings and music. Older, experienced men smile about it, and remember with emotion beautiful time of life, in which one is angry at his lot of having to be so much and seem so little. Later, one really seems to be more-- but the faith in being much has been lost, unless one remain throughout his life vanity's hopeless fool.

    I enjoyed aphorisms from many other sections as well.

    From 18

    The first stage of logic is judgment, whose essence consists, as the best logicians have determined, in belief. All belief is based on the feeling of pleasure or pain in relation to the feeling subject. A new, third feeling as the result of two preceding feelings is judgment in its lowest form.

    From 70

    How is it that every execution offends us more than a murder? Is it the coldness of the judges, the painful preparations, the understanding that a man is here being used as a means to deter others. For guilt is not being punished, even if there were guilt; guilt lies in the educators, the parents, the environment, in us, not in the murderer-- I am talking about the motivating circumstances.

    87

    Luke 18:14, improved: He who humbleth himself wants to be exalted.

    102

    'Man always acts for the good:' We don't accuse nature of immorality when it sends us a thunderstorm, and makes us wet: why do we call the injurious man immoral? Because in the first case, we assume necessity, and in the second a voluntarily governing free will. But this distinction is in error. Furthermore, even intentional injury is not called immoral in all circumstances: without hesitating, we intentionally kill a gnat, for example, simply because we do not like its buzz; we intentionally punish the criminal and do him harm, to protect ourselves and society. In the first case it is the individual who does harm intentionally, for self-preservation or simply to avoid discomfort; in the second case, the state does the harm. All morality allows the intentional infliction of harm for self defense; that is, when it is a matter of self-preservation! But these two points of view are sufficient to explain all evil acts which men practice against other men; man wants to get pleasure or resist unpleasure; in some sense it is always a matter of self-preservation. Socrates and Plato are right: whatever man does, he always acts for the good; that is, in a way that seems to him good (useful) according to the degree of his intellect, the prevailing measure of his rationality.


    There are so many more passages that I underlined and that I deemed worth sharing. However, if I were to share all of my favorite passages, I might as well copy the entire book!



  8. Shyam Shyam says:

    The people no doubt possess something that might be called an artistic need, but it is small and cheap to satisfy. The refuse of art is at bottom all that is required: we should honestly admit that to ourselves. Just consider, for instance, the kind of songs and tunes the most vigorous, soundest and most naive strata of our populace nowadays take true delight in, dwelling among shepherds, cowherds, farmers, huntsmen, soldiers, seamen, and then supply yourself with an answer. And in the small town, in precisely the homes that are the seat of those civic virtues inherited from of old, do they not love, indeed dote on the very worst music in any way produced today? Whoever talks of a profound need for art, of an unfilled desire for art, on the part of the people as it is, is either raving or lying . . . Nowadays it is only in exceptional men that there exists an artistic need of an exalted kind. (2.1.169)

    Active men are generally wanting in the higher activity: I mean that of the individual. They are active as officials, businessmen, scholars, that is to say as generic creatures, but not as distinct individual and unique human beings; in this regard they are lazy. —It is the misfortune of the active that their activity is always a little irrational. One ought not to ask the cash-amassing banker, for example, what the purpose of his restless activity is: it is irrational. The active roll as the stone rolls, in obedience to the stupidity of the laws of mechanics—As at all times, so now too, men are divided into the slaves and the free; for he who does not have two-thirds of his day to himself is a slave, let him be what he may otherwise: statesman, businessman, official, scholar. (1.283)
    __________
    If someone obstinately and for a long time wants to appear something it is in the end hard for him to be anything else. The profession of almost every man, even that of the artist, begins with hypocrisy, with an imitation from without, with a copying of what is most effective. He who is always wearing a mask of friendly countenance must finally acquire a power over benevolent moods without which the impression of friendliness cannot be obtained—and finally these acquire power over him, he is benevolent. (1.51)

    There is one thing one has to have: either a cheerful disposition by nature or a disposition made cheerful by art and knowledge. (1.486)

    __________
    Drunk with the odour of blossoms. (1.29)

    While there may be much talk about people, there is none at all about man. (1.35)

    No one is accountable for his deeds, no one for his nature; to judge is the same thing as to be unjust. This also applies when the individual judges himself. The proposition is as clear as daylight, and yet here everyone prefers to retreat back into the shadows and untruth: from fear of the consequences. (1.39)

    One can promise actions but not feelings; for the latter are involuntary. He who promises someone he will always love him or always hate him or always be faithful to him, promises something that does not reside in his power. (1.58)

    There are not a few people (perhaps it is even most people) who, in order to maintain in themselves a sense of self-respect and a certain efficiency in action, are obliged to disparage and diminish in their minds all the other people they know. (1.63)

    Vanity enriches.—How poor the human spirit would be without vanity! (1.79)

    Men are not ashamed of thinking something dirty, but they are when they imagine they are credited with this dirty thought. (1.84)

    Socrates and Plato are right: whatever man does he always does the good, that is to say: that which seems to him good (useful) according to the relative degree of his intellect, the measure of his rationality. (1.102)

    At the sight of a waterfall we think we see in the countless carvings, twisting, and breaking of the waves capriciousness and freedom of will; but everything here is necessary, every motion mathematically calculable. So it is too in the case of human actions; if one were all-knowing, one would be able to calculate every individual action, likewise every advance in knowledge, every error, every piece of wickedness. The actor himself, to be sure, is fixed in the illusion of free will; if for one moment the wheel of the world were to stand still, and there were an all-knowing, calculating intelligence there to make use of this pause, it could narrate the future of every creature to the remotest ages and describe every track along which this wheel had yet to roll. The actor’s description regarding himself, the assumption of free-will, is itself part of the mechanism it would have to compute. (1.106)

    It is easier to relinquish a desire altogether than enjoy it in moderation. (1.139)

    We all think that a work of art, an artist, is proved to be of high quality if it seizes hold on us and profoundly moves us. But for this to be so our own high quality in judgement and sensibility would first have to have been proved. (1.161)

    The reader and the author often fail to understand one another because the author knows his theme too well and almost finds it boring, so that he dispenses with the examples and illustrations of which he knows hundreds; the reader, however, is unfamiliar with the subject and can easily find it ill-established if examples and illustrations are withheld from him. (1.202)

    One can clearly observe this decline from decade to decade if one keeps an eye on the public behaviour, which is plainly growing more and more plebeian. (1.250)

    Why is knowledge, the element of the scholar and philosopher, associated with pleasure? Firstly and above all, because one here becomes conscious of one’s strength; for the same reason, that is to say, that gymnastic exercises are pleasurably even when there are no spectators. Secondly, because in the course of acquiring knowledge one goes beyond former conceptions and their advocates and is victor over them, or at least believes oneself to be., Thirdly, because through a new piece of knowledge, however small, we become superior to all and feel ourselves as the only ones who in this matter know aright., These three causes of pleasure are the most important, though there are many other subsidiary causes, according to the nature of the man who acquires knowledge. (1.252)

    The value of having for a time rigorously pursued a rigorous science does not derive precisely from the results obtained from it: for in relation to the ocean of things worth knowing these will be a mere vanishing droplet. But there will eventuate an increase in energy, in reasoning capacity, in toughness of endurance; one will have learned how to achieve an objective by the appropriate means. To this extent it is invaluable, with regard to everything one will afterwards do, once to have been a man of science. (1.256)

    Men overvalue everything big and conspicuous. (1.260)

    He who has furnished his instrument with only two strings—like the scholars, who apart from the drive to knowledge have only an acquired religious drive—cannot understand those men who are able to play on more strings than two. It lies in the nature of higher, many-stringed culture that it should always be falsely interpreted by the lower; as happens, for example, when art is counted a disguised form of religiousness. Indeed, people who are only religious understand even science as a seeking on the part of the religious feeling, just as the deaf-and-dumb do not know what music is if it is not visible movement. (1.281)

    Epictetus, Seneca, and Plutarch are little read now, that work and industry—formerly adherents of the great goddess health—sometimes seem to rage like an epidemic. Because time for thinking and quietness in thinking are lacking, one no longer ponders deviant views: one contents oneself with hating them. (1.282)

    We quite often encounter copies of significant men; and, as also in the case of paintings, most people prefer the copies to the originals. (1.294)

    When entering into a marriage one ought to ask oneself: do you believe you are going to enjoy talking with this woman up into your old age? Everything else in marriage is transitory, but most of the time you are together will be devoted to conversation. (1.406)

    If one sets aside the demands of custom for a moment, one might very well consider whether nature and reason do not dictate that a man ought to have two marriages, perhaps in the following form. At first, at the age of twenty-two, he would marry a girl older than him who is intellectually and morally his superior and who can lead him through the perils of the twenties (ambition, hatred, self-contempt, passions of all kinds). Later, her love would pass over wholly into the motherly, and she would not merely endure it but actively encourage it if, in his thirties, the man should enter into an alliance with a young girl whose education he would himself take in hand—For the twenties marriage is a necessary institution, for the thirties a useful but not a necessary one: in later life it is often harmful and promotes the spiritual retrogression of the man. (1.421)

    . . . broadens his egoism in respect of duration and enables him seriously to pursue objectives that transcend his individual lifespan. (1.455)

    That we place more value on satisfaction of vanity than on any other form of well-being (security, accommodation, pleasure of all kinds) is demonstrated to a ludicrous degree in the act that, quite apart from any political reasons, everyone desires the abolition of slavery and abominates the idea of reducing people to this condition: whereas everyone must at the same time realize that slaves live in every respect more happily and in greater security than the modern worker, and that the work done by slaves is very little work compared with that done by the ‘worker’. One protests in the name of ‘human dignity’: but that, expressed more simply, is that precious vanity which feels being unequal, being publicly rated lower, as the hardest lot. — The Cynic thinks differently, because he despises honour: — and thus Diogenes was for a time a slave and private tutor. (1.457)

    He who directs his passion upon causes (the sciences, the common weal, cultural interests, the arts) deprives his passion for people of much of its fire. (1.487)

    Young people love what is strange and interesting, regardless of whether it is true or false. More mature spirits love in truth that which is strange and interesting in it. Heads fully mature, finally, love truth also where it appears plain and simple and is boring to ordinary people: they have noticed that truth is accustomed to impart its highest spiritual possessions with an air of simplicity. (1.609)

    The tone in which young people speak, praise, blame, poeticise displeases their elders because it is too loud and yet at the same time hollow and indistinct, like a sound in a vaunt that acquires such volume through the emptiness surrounding it: for most of what young people think does not proceed from the abundance of their own nature but is a resonance and echo of what has been thought, said praised, and blamed in their presence. (1.613)

    Belief in truth begins with doubt as to all truths believed hitherto. (2.1.20)

    At all times arrogance has rightly been designated the ‘vice of the intellectual’—yet without the motive power of this vice truth and the respect accorded to it would be miserable accommodated on this earth. (2.1.26)

    Farce of many of the industrious.—Through an excess of exertion they gain for themselves time, and afterwards have no idea what to do with it except to count the hours until is has expired. (2.1.47)

    Every good book is written for a definite reader and those like him, and for just this reason will be viewed unfavourably by all other readers, the great majority: which is why its reputation rests on a narrow basis and can be erected only slowly—The mediocre and bad book is so because it tries to please many and does please them. (2.1.158)

    They themselves are not educated: how should they be able to educate? (2.1.181)

    We can distinguish five grades of traveller: those of the first and lowest grade are those who travel and, instead of seeing, are themselves seen—they are as though blind; next come those who actually see the world; the third experience something as a consequence of what they have seen; the fourth absorb into themselves what they have experienced and bear it away with them; lastly there re a few men of the highest energy whom after they have experienced and absorbed all they have seen, necessarily have to body it forth again out of themselves in works and actions as soon as they have returned home—It is like these five species of traveller that all men travel through the whole journey of life, the lowest purely passive, the highest those who transform into action and exhaust everything they experience. (2.1.228)

    Of him who surrenders himself to events there remains less and less. (2.1.315)

    What significance can we then accord the press as it is now, with its daily expenses diture of lung power on exclaiming, deafening, inciting, shocling—is it anything more than the permanent false alarm that leads ears and senses off in the wrong direction? (2.1.321)

    The bad acquires esteem by being imitated, the good loses it—especially in art. (2.1.381)

    We possess the conscience of an industrious age: and this conscience does not permit us to bestow our best hours and mornings on art, however grand and worthy this art may be,. To us art counts as a leisure, a recreational activity: we devote to it the remnants of our time and energies. (2.2.170)

    A little garden, figs, little cheeses and in addition three or four good friends—these were the sensual pleasures of Epicurus. (2.2.192)

    An excellent quotation can annihilate entire pages, indeed an entire book, in that it warns the reader and seems to cry out to him: ‘Beware, I am the jewel and around me there is lead, pallid, ignominious lead!’ Every word, every idea, wants to dwell only in its own company: that is the moral of high style. (2.2.111)


  9. Hatebeams Hatebeams says:

    My copy was stolen before I could finish, but I did get at least as far as aphorism 201 - and what a gem it is! I keep a copy in my workstation at all times and will transcribe it here. I edited the text a little for extra venom (not usually necessary with FWN!).


    201
    Bad writers necessary. There will always have to be bad writers, for they reflect the taste of CRETINS who have needs as much as the mature do. If human life were longer, there would be more of the individuals who have matured than of the CRETINS, or at least as many. But as it is, the great majority ARE CRETINS which means there are always many more undeveloped intellects with bad taste. Moreover, these people demand satisfaction of their needs with the greater vehemence of CRETINS and they force the existence of bad authors.


    Don't say it ain't so!


  10. Dan Dan says:

    Re-read: Jan 26-Feb 4, 2017

    This would not be among my top choices if I were looking through Nietzsche's works for a beach read--for that, I would want a copy of Zarathustra, The Gay Science or Twilight of the Idols. No, this one I see as something you might read on the commuter train to work or during your lunch break or in that quiet that forms when the party's over and everyone has gone home.

    Nor do I think this book is the best introduction to Nietzsche's work. A number of themes closely associated with Nietzsche's thought, such as the the will to power, the genealogy of morals and even the concept of the Ubermensch emerge from his discussion in Human, All Too Human, but here they often appear to be in a looser and more rudimentary form, whereas in his later books the same concepts seem much more fully thought out, and more effectively expressed.

    As with many of his other books, here Nietzsche's thought might be termed post-metaphysical. That is, in terms of his philosophical argumentation in Human, All Too Human, Nietzsche does not stoop to disproving metaphysics, but assumes that it has already been disproven, and that this is the case for his reader as well.

    In Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche writes It has gradually become clear to me what every great philosophy up till now has consisted of--namely, the confession of its originator, and a species of involuntary and unconscious autobiography... This seems particularly fitting with regard to Human, All Too Human, which, as Marion Faber's introduction points out, was written while Nietzsche was breaking with Richard Wagner, with Schopenhauerian philosophy, and as he had taken up residence with a friend, psychologist Paul Ree. Each of these concerns are reflected in the book, which includes aphorisms explicitly attacking Schopenhauer, others implicitly attacking Wagner, and still others in which Nietzsche comments on Ree's De l'origine des sentiments moraux and on the science of psychology in general.


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Menschliches, Allzumenschliches ➧ [Ebook] ➢ Menschliches, Allzumenschliches By Friedrich Nietzsche ➲ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk This volume presents Nietzsche's remarkable collection of almost aphorisms in R J Hollingdale's distinguished translation, together with a new historical introduction by Richard Schacht Subtitled A B This volume presents Nietzsche's remarkable collection of almostaphorisms in R J Hollingdale's distinguished translation, together with a new historical introduction by Richard Schacht Subtitled A Book for Free Spirits, Human, All Too Human marked for Nietzsche a new positivism and skepticism with which he challenged his previous metaphysical and psychological assumptions Nearly all the themes of his later work are displayed here with characteristic perceptiveness and honestynot to say suspicion and ironyin language of great brio It remains one of the fundamental works for an understanding of his thought.

10 thoughts on “Menschliches, Allzumenschliches

  1. Glenn Russell Glenn Russell says:



    There are many generalizations and sweeping judgments made about Nietzsche and his philosophy. I find such remarks next to useless. For me, there is only one way to approach Nietzsche – read each paragraph and maxim and aphorism slowly and carefully and arrive at my own conclusions after seeing how his words apply to my own life. As by way of example, below are several of his shorter aphorisms from this book coupled with my comments.

    “FROM CANNIBAL COUNTRY – In solitude the lonely man is eaten up by himself, among crowds by the many. Choose which you prefer.” ---------------- I’ve spent many hours in solitude, sometimes days or even weeks at a time. For me, solitude is pure gold: to live within, to mediate, to relax into the core of one’s body and inner light is most refreshing, a sheer joy, anything but an experience of being lonely. Matter of fact, any feelings of loneliness quickly poisons one’s solitude. If you feel lonely, perhaps it’s time to slow down and take a serious account of your life.

    “AGAINST THE DISPARAGERS OF BREVITY – A brief dictum may be the fruit and harvest of long reflection. The reader, however, who is a novice in this field and has never considered the case in point, sees something embryonic in all brief dicta, not without a reproachful hint to the author, requesting him not to serve up such raw and ill-prepared food.” ---------------- I enjoy 800 page novels but I also enjoy reading aphorisms. The shorter, the better. Sometimes, one, two or three sentences is all that’s needed to spark probing reflection and sincere consideration.

    “DEBAUCHERY – Not joy but joylessness is the mother of debauchery.” --------------- I recall college drinking parties with lots and lots of beer and hard liquor, where everyone drank themselves into numbness and a drunken stupor. Those memories are like a distant bad dream. Fortunately, it only took a party or two for me to realize that wasn’t my scene. I started practicing yoga and meditation and have had the good fortune to experience great joy for many years as a direct result of this practice.

    “KNOWING HOW TO WASH ONESELF CLEAN – We must know how to emerge cleaner from unclean conditions, and, if necessary, how to wash ourselves even with dirty water.” ---------------When I encounter ugliness, whether in people or in my surroundings, I try to use such ugliness as a sting, a reminder to cherish experiences of kindness and beauty.

    “THE FARCE OF MANY INDUSTRIOUS PERSONS - By an excess of effort they win leisure for themselves, and then they can do nothing with it but count the hours until the tale is ended.” -------------------- I recall Joseph Campbell relating how many workaholics and professionals spend many years climbing the ladder but when they get to the top they realize they are leaning against the wrong wall. From my own experience, I’ve had a couple professional careers but I’ve always enjoyed weekends more than weekdays. I think Nietzsche hits the bulls-eye here: If you are at a loss when you spend time away from your work-a-day world, ask yourself if you are really living life from your own creative and spiritual depth.

    “SIGNS FROM DREAMS - What one sometimes does not know and feel accurately in waking hours whether one has a good or a bad conscience as regards some person is revealed completely and unambiguously by dreams.” --------------------- I just finished ‘The Kindly Ones’ by Jonathan Littell where the main character recalls his life as a Nazi SS officer when he had a series of vivid, horrific, hellish dreams. However, he refused to listen carefully to what he dreams were telling him; if he did, he probably wouldn’t have continued to engage in twisted, perverted practices and a number of senseless murders. For myself, for years I’ve kept a dream journal and practiced lucid dreaming. Most fruitful for self-discovery.

    Since this is a review of one of Nietzsche’s books, Nietzsche gets the last word. And since we are all readers of books here, I thought this maxim most appropriate:
    “A GOOD BOOK NEEDS TIME – Every good book tastes bitter when it first comes out, for it has the defect of newness. Moreover, it suffers damage from its living author, if he is well known and much talked about. For all the world is accustomed to confuse the author with his work. Whatever of profundity, sweetness, and brilliance the work may contain must be developed as the years go by, under the case of growing, then old, and lastly traditional reverence. Many hours must pass, many a spider must have woven its web about the book. A book is made better by good readers and clearer by good opponents.”

  2. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    Menschliches, Allzumenschliches = Human, All Too Human, Friedrich Nietzsche

    Human, All Too Human: A Book for Free Spirits is a book by 19th-century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, originally published in 1878. A second part, Assorted Opinions and Maxims, was published in 1879, and a third part, The Wanderer and his Shadow, followed in 1880.

    The book is Nietzsche's first in the aphoristic style that would come to dominate his writings, discussing a variety of concepts in short paragraphs or sayings.

    Human, All Too Human “to the memory of Voltaire on the celebration of the anniversary of his death, May 30, 1778.” Instead of a preface, the first part originally included a quotation from Descartes's Discourse on the Method.

    Nietzsche later republished all three parts as a two-volume edition in 1886, adding a preface to each volume, and removing the Descartes quote as well as the dedication to Voltaire.

    تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز چهاردهم ماه جولای سال 2006 میلادی

    عنوان: انسانی، زیاده انسانی؛ نویسنده: ف‍ری‍دری‍ش وی‍ل‍ه‍ل‍م ن‍ی‍چ‍ه؛ مترجمین: ابوتراب سهراب؛ محمد محقق نیشابوری؛ تهران، نشر مرکز، 1384؛ در 476ص؛ چاپ دوم 1385؛ چاپ سوم 1387؛ شابک 9789643058476؛ چاپ چهارم 1389؛ چاپ پنجم: 1391؛ چاپ ششم 1393؛ موضوع انسان - از نویسندگان آلمانی سده 19میلادی

    عنوان: انسانی، زیاده انسانی؛ نویسنده: ف‍ری‍دری‍ش وی‍ل‍ه‍ل‍م ن‍ی‍چ‍ه؛ مترجم: عباس کاشف؛ تهران، نشر فرزان روز؛ 1395، در 470ص؛ شابک 9789643214036؛

    انسانی، زیاده انسانی (سال 1878میلادی)؛ با سبکی ویژه، دارای «ششصدوسی و هشت» گزینگویه، دومین اثر «نیچه»، پس از کتاب «زایش تراژدی از روح موسیقی، سال 1872میلادی» است؛ «زایش تراژدی» نخستین کتاب ایشان بود، که در باب «فیلولوژی نظری» منتشر شد؛ در آن برهه، «نیچه» استاد سی و سه ساله ی «فیلولوژی کلاسیک»، در دانشگاه «بال» بودند، که پس از نگارش «انسانی، زیاده انسانی»، رسماً از آن سمت استعفا کردند؛

    به گویش خود نیچه: «انسانی، زیاده انسانی یادآور یک تنش است»> تنشی که از سویی، زاییده ی دوره ی بیماری «نیچه»، و از دیگر سو، بیانگر دگراندیشی ایشانست؛

    میتوان گفت: این کتاب سند گویایی از «نیچه»ی فیلولوژیست، و منتقد فرهنگی، به سوی «نیچه»ی فیلسوف، و نگارگر است؛ یعنی همان «نیچه»ای که امروز همگان میشناسند؛ بیشتر آثار «نیچه»، دستاورد همین دوره ی دوم اندیشه ورزی ایشانست؛

    آثاری همچون: «آنک انسان (سال 1888میلادی)»، «چنین گفت زرتشت»، «فراسوی خیر و شر»، «پگاه»، «شامگاه بتان»، در این دوره ی تنش در «نیچه» آغاز شد، ولی تنش هماره خبر از تنشهای بزرگی میداد، که «نیچه»، فرهنگ و تمدن را، در حال گذار و رهسپاری به آنسوی میدید؛ همان تنشی که «نیچه» آنرا «مرگ خدا» مینامید؛ کتاب «انسانی، زیاده انسانی»، افشاگر چالشهایی ست، که «نیچه» در آنها گرفتار بود

    ا. شربیانی

  3. Bradley Bradley says:

    Probably my favorite book by Nietzsche excluding Thus Spoke Zarathustra. If you love aphorisms that pack a punch then this will be right up your alley. Not a laborious read like some treatise philosophy, but witty, controversial, eloquent, and brutally honest.
    My favorite aphorism - Life consists of rare individual moments of the highest significance and countless intervals in which at best the phantoms of those moments hover over us. Love, spring, a beautiful melody, the mountains, the moon, the sea - they speak truly to our heart only once: if they ever do in fact find speech. For many people never experience these moments at all but are themselves intervals and pauses in the symphony of real life. (#586) So beautiful! Should be studied alongside Shakespeare. Breathtaking.

  4. Jason Jason says:

    The Nietzsche of his middle period is, in my view, the best, before his mental breakdown. There is less of the crazed polemic in this work than, say, in Ecce Homo, Zarathustra, or Twilight of the Idols, although Nietzsche, being Nietzsche, never takes prisoners in his attacks. Still, there is a good deal of thoughtful reflection on philosophy, culture, religion, family, and marriage that are worth considering.

  5. Rachel Rachel says:

    Though I really enjoyed this book and love studying the works of Nietzsche, Sartre, and others, I'm reminded of a quote recently use on the Daily Show: I was once a college sophomore, too.

    Quoting this book or carrying it around with you on the bus on your way to work doesn't necessarily transform you into someone with deep, cutting insight into our existentialist situation...nor does it make you the overman. Remember: We all took the same PHIL 101 classes;)

  6. Teacherhuman Teacherhuman says:

    I am still not certain it is really possible in this culture to become--or perhaps remain a free spirit. In the oppressive expectations of a world that requires conformity for sustinence may well be a kind of caging we may never escape. We must be always worried our expression of spirit is too unleashed, too sexual, too ethnic, too loud, too inspired--too free for everyone who is not. Nothing scarier than someone who is who and what she (or he) is with no apologies for it to those who are uncomfortable in their own skins.
    Still Nietzsche's treatise is on my must read list for all who wish to be truly human.

  7. Lady Jane Lady Jane says:

    Allegedly, Nietzsche wrote this piece after he broke his friendship with Wagner, the musician Nietzsche formerly idolized; soon after he began to break away from his fondness for the romanticism of music and art. This shift in attitude is strongly conveyed in this amazing work, Human, All Too Human. As Marion Faber writes in the introduction, Judging from its sour title, it would certainly be a book which differed from its visionary and utopian predecessors. 'Human, all too human' is kind of a sigh in the face of the intractability of the human material to the projects of human sublimity. Indeed, it is neither a critical judgment of nature nor a defense; it is simply a forthright and unaffected analysis of the human condition and through the ages and stages under various passions and conditions.

    “Human, All Too Human” is a collection of 638 aphorisms divided into nine categories in which Nietzsche reveals his observations of human nature and exposes common misunderstandings humans have regarding philosophy, religion, art, morality, society, relationships, men and women.

    The book is divided into nine sections: 1) Of First and Last Things, which deals primarily with ontology, epistemology, and miscellaneous metaphysical concepts. 2) On the History of Moral Feelings, in which the author analyses the emotions and conditions that lead to the inventions and vacillations of morals and man-made rules in the social contract. 3) Religious Life, in which he describes the different mental states and emotions revolving the human predisposition to inventing deities. 4) From the Soul of Artists and Writers, in which he cynically critiques the so-called primitive euphoric states that artists and lovers of the arts undergo in this realm. 5) Signs of Higher and Lower Culture, in which he defines and speculates on the two. 6) Man In Society, in which he conducts further speculation of man in the social contract. 7) Woman and Child, which is a collection of aphorisms that relate to the subject of relationships, marriage, and progeny. 8) A Look At The State, in which Nietzsche describes his views on politics and power. Last but not least, 9) Man Alone With Himself, in which he meditates and exposes man’s nature as an individual.

    One of my favorite parts of the book is found in the first section and it is passage number two. In this passage, Nietzsche states that the congenital defect of the philosopher is a lack of historical sense. Nietzsche states that “Everything the philosopher asserts is basically no more than a statement about man within a very limited time span…. They will not understand that man has evolved, that the faculty of knowledge has also evolved, while some of them even permit themselves to spin the whole world from out of this faculty of knowledge…. The philosopher sees ‘insticts’ in present-day man, and assumes that they belong to the unchangeable facts of human nature, that they can, to that extent, provide a key to the understanding of the world in general. This entire teleology is predicated on the ability to speak about man of the last four thousand years as if he were eternal, the natural direction of all things in the world from the beginning. But everything has evolved; there are no eternal facts, nor are there any absolute truths. Thus historical philosophizing is necessary henceforth, and the virtue of modesty as well.” This is very significant not only to the entire branch of metaphysics, but also as an introduction to the book because Nietzsche admits that in the human condition that he has in common with the rest of us, even the most seemingly insightful speculations are based only on what we can see of the iceberg—namely, only about as far back as four thousand years from which we have found some evidence. The rest of our history is merely suspicion and nobody can possibly ascertain what the behaviors and thoughts were back then. Worse even, that most people do not even study the history that is available to us, and judge everything based on the even shorter time span that they know--- which can be a couple of centuries, or not even that; the simple-minded unread judge only by their own time period. In conclusion to this realization, one must accept that there are no absolute truths, for the “truths” do not last more than a few centuries, at most. They always change along with human whim and evolution of the mind and taste.

    One of my favorite sections is the last one, Man Alone With Himself, because Nietzsche provides insightful musings on the natural state of the individual and his motives, psychology, etc. Some of my favorite passages are as follows:

    483

    Enemies of truth: Convictions are more dangerous enemies of truth than lies.


    484

    Topsy turvy world: We criticize a thinker more sharply when he proposes a tenet that disagreeable to us; and yet it would be more reasonable to do this when we find his tenet agreeable.


    489

    Not too deep: People who comprehend a matter in all its depth seldom remain true to it forever. For they have brought its depths to the light; and then there is always much to see about it that is bad.

    490

    Idealists' delusion: All idealists imagine that the causes they serve are significantly better than the other causes in the world; they do not want to believe that if their cause is to flourish at all, it needs exactly the same foul-smelling manure that all other human undertakings require.

    492

    The right profession: Men seldom endure a profession if they do not believe or persuade themselves that it is basically more important than all others. Women do the same with their lovers.

    509

    Everyone superior in one thing: In civilized circumstances, everyone feels superior to everyone else in at least one way; this is the basis of the general goodwill, inasmuch as everyone is someone who, under certain conditions, can be of help, and need therefore feel no shame in allowing himself to be helped.

    537

    Value of a profession: A profession makes us thoughtless: therein lies its greatest blessing. For it is a bulwark, behind which we are allowed to withdraw when qualms and worries of a general kind attack us.

    599

    The age of arrogance: The true period of arrogance for talented men comes between their twenty-sixth and thirtieth year; it is the time of first ripeness, with a good bit of sourness still remaining. On the basis of what one feels inside himself, one demands from other people, who see little or nothing of it, respect and humility; and because these are not at first forthcoming, one takes vengeance with a glance, an arrogant gesture, or a tone of voice. This a fine ear and eye will recognize in all the products of those years, be their poems, philosophies, or paintings and music. Older, experienced men smile about it, and remember with emotion beautiful time of life, in which one is angry at his lot of having to be so much and seem so little. Later, one really seems to be more-- but the faith in being much has been lost, unless one remain throughout his life vanity's hopeless fool.

    I enjoyed aphorisms from many other sections as well.

    From 18

    The first stage of logic is judgment, whose essence consists, as the best logicians have determined, in belief. All belief is based on the feeling of pleasure or pain in relation to the feeling subject. A new, third feeling as the result of two preceding feelings is judgment in its lowest form.

    From 70

    How is it that every execution offends us more than a murder? Is it the coldness of the judges, the painful preparations, the understanding that a man is here being used as a means to deter others. For guilt is not being punished, even if there were guilt; guilt lies in the educators, the parents, the environment, in us, not in the murderer-- I am talking about the motivating circumstances.

    87

    Luke 18:14, improved: He who humbleth himself wants to be exalted.

    102

    'Man always acts for the good:' We don't accuse nature of immorality when it sends us a thunderstorm, and makes us wet: why do we call the injurious man immoral? Because in the first case, we assume necessity, and in the second a voluntarily governing free will. But this distinction is in error. Furthermore, even intentional injury is not called immoral in all circumstances: without hesitating, we intentionally kill a gnat, for example, simply because we do not like its buzz; we intentionally punish the criminal and do him harm, to protect ourselves and society. In the first case it is the individual who does harm intentionally, for self-preservation or simply to avoid discomfort; in the second case, the state does the harm. All morality allows the intentional infliction of harm for self defense; that is, when it is a matter of self-preservation! But these two points of view are sufficient to explain all evil acts which men practice against other men; man wants to get pleasure or resist unpleasure; in some sense it is always a matter of self-preservation. Socrates and Plato are right: whatever man does, he always acts for the good; that is, in a way that seems to him good (useful) according to the degree of his intellect, the prevailing measure of his rationality.


    There are so many more passages that I underlined and that I deemed worth sharing. However, if I were to share all of my favorite passages, I might as well copy the entire book!


  8. Shyam Shyam says:

    The people no doubt possess something that might be called an artistic need, but it is small and cheap to satisfy. The refuse of art is at bottom all that is required: we should honestly admit that to ourselves. Just consider, for instance, the kind of songs and tunes the most vigorous, soundest and most naive strata of our populace nowadays take true delight in, dwelling among shepherds, cowherds, farmers, huntsmen, soldiers, seamen, and then supply yourself with an answer. And in the small town, in precisely the homes that are the seat of those civic virtues inherited from of old, do they not love, indeed dote on the very worst music in any way produced today? Whoever talks of a profound need for art, of an unfilled desire for art, on the part of the people as it is, is either raving or lying . . . Nowadays it is only in exceptional men that there exists an artistic need of an exalted kind. (2.1.169)

    Active men are generally wanting in the higher activity: I mean that of the individual. They are active as officials, businessmen, scholars, that is to say as generic creatures, but not as distinct individual and unique human beings; in this regard they are lazy. —It is the misfortune of the active that their activity is always a little irrational. One ought not to ask the cash-amassing banker, for example, what the purpose of his restless activity is: it is irrational. The active roll as the stone rolls, in obedience to the stupidity of the laws of mechanics—As at all times, so now too, men are divided into the slaves and the free; for he who does not have two-thirds of his day to himself is a slave, let him be what he may otherwise: statesman, businessman, official, scholar. (1.283)
    __________
    If someone obstinately and for a long time wants to appear something it is in the end hard for him to be anything else. The profession of almost every man, even that of the artist, begins with hypocrisy, with an imitation from without, with a copying of what is most effective. He who is always wearing a mask of friendly countenance must finally acquire a power over benevolent moods without which the impression of friendliness cannot be obtained—and finally these acquire power over him, he is benevolent. (1.51)

    There is one thing one has to have: either a cheerful disposition by nature or a disposition made cheerful by art and knowledge. (1.486)

    __________
    Drunk with the odour of blossoms. (1.29)

    While there may be much talk about people, there is none at all about man. (1.35)

    No one is accountable for his deeds, no one for his nature; to judge is the same thing as to be unjust. This also applies when the individual judges himself. The proposition is as clear as daylight, and yet here everyone prefers to retreat back into the shadows and untruth: from fear of the consequences. (1.39)

    One can promise actions but not feelings; for the latter are involuntary. He who promises someone he will always love him or always hate him or always be faithful to him, promises something that does not reside in his power. (1.58)

    There are not a few people (perhaps it is even most people) who, in order to maintain in themselves a sense of self-respect and a certain efficiency in action, are obliged to disparage and diminish in their minds all the other people they know. (1.63)

    Vanity enriches.—How poor the human spirit would be without vanity! (1.79)

    Men are not ashamed of thinking something dirty, but they are when they imagine they are credited with this dirty thought. (1.84)

    Socrates and Plato are right: whatever man does he always does the good, that is to say: that which seems to him good (useful) according to the relative degree of his intellect, the measure of his rationality. (1.102)

    At the sight of a waterfall we think we see in the countless carvings, twisting, and breaking of the waves capriciousness and freedom of will; but everything here is necessary, every motion mathematically calculable. So it is too in the case of human actions; if one were all-knowing, one would be able to calculate every individual action, likewise every advance in knowledge, every error, every piece of wickedness. The actor himself, to be sure, is fixed in the illusion of free will; if for one moment the wheel of the world were to stand still, and there were an all-knowing, calculating intelligence there to make use of this pause, it could narrate the future of every creature to the remotest ages and describe every track along which this wheel had yet to roll. The actor’s description regarding himself, the assumption of free-will, is itself part of the mechanism it would have to compute. (1.106)

    It is easier to relinquish a desire altogether than enjoy it in moderation. (1.139)

    We all think that a work of art, an artist, is proved to be of high quality if it seizes hold on us and profoundly moves us. But for this to be so our own high quality in judgement and sensibility would first have to have been proved. (1.161)

    The reader and the author often fail to understand one another because the author knows his theme too well and almost finds it boring, so that he dispenses with the examples and illustrations of which he knows hundreds; the reader, however, is unfamiliar with the subject and can easily find it ill-established if examples and illustrations are withheld from him. (1.202)

    One can clearly observe this decline from decade to decade if one keeps an eye on the public behaviour, which is plainly growing more and more plebeian. (1.250)

    Why is knowledge, the element of the scholar and philosopher, associated with pleasure? Firstly and above all, because one here becomes conscious of one’s strength; for the same reason, that is to say, that gymnastic exercises are pleasurably even when there are no spectators. Secondly, because in the course of acquiring knowledge one goes beyond former conceptions and their advocates and is victor over them, or at least believes oneself to be., Thirdly, because through a new piece of knowledge, however small, we become superior to all and feel ourselves as the only ones who in this matter know aright., These three causes of pleasure are the most important, though there are many other subsidiary causes, according to the nature of the man who acquires knowledge. (1.252)

    The value of having for a time rigorously pursued a rigorous science does not derive precisely from the results obtained from it: for in relation to the ocean of things worth knowing these will be a mere vanishing droplet. But there will eventuate an increase in energy, in reasoning capacity, in toughness of endurance; one will have learned how to achieve an objective by the appropriate means. To this extent it is invaluable, with regard to everything one will afterwards do, once to have been a man of science. (1.256)

    Men overvalue everything big and conspicuous. (1.260)

    He who has furnished his instrument with only two strings—like the scholars, who apart from the drive to knowledge have only an acquired religious drive—cannot understand those men who are able to play on more strings than two. It lies in the nature of higher, many-stringed culture that it should always be falsely interpreted by the lower; as happens, for example, when art is counted a disguised form of religiousness. Indeed, people who are only religious understand even science as a seeking on the part of the religious feeling, just as the deaf-and-dumb do not know what music is if it is not visible movement. (1.281)

    Epictetus, Seneca, and Plutarch are little read now, that work and industry—formerly adherents of the great goddess health—sometimes seem to rage like an epidemic. Because time for thinking and quietness in thinking are lacking, one no longer ponders deviant views: one contents oneself with hating them. (1.282)

    We quite often encounter copies of significant men; and, as also in the case of paintings, most people prefer the copies to the originals. (1.294)

    When entering into a marriage one ought to ask oneself: do you believe you are going to enjoy talking with this woman up into your old age? Everything else in marriage is transitory, but most of the time you are together will be devoted to conversation. (1.406)

    If one sets aside the demands of custom for a moment, one might very well consider whether nature and reason do not dictate that a man ought to have two marriages, perhaps in the following form. At first, at the age of twenty-two, he would marry a girl older than him who is intellectually and morally his superior and who can lead him through the perils of the twenties (ambition, hatred, self-contempt, passions of all kinds). Later, her love would pass over wholly into the motherly, and she would not merely endure it but actively encourage it if, in his thirties, the man should enter into an alliance with a young girl whose education he would himself take in hand—For the twenties marriage is a necessary institution, for the thirties a useful but not a necessary one: in later life it is often harmful and promotes the spiritual retrogression of the man. (1.421)

    . . . broadens his egoism in respect of duration and enables him seriously to pursue objectives that transcend his individual lifespan. (1.455)

    That we place more value on satisfaction of vanity than on any other form of well-being (security, accommodation, pleasure of all kinds) is demonstrated to a ludicrous degree in the act that, quite apart from any political reasons, everyone desires the abolition of slavery and abominates the idea of reducing people to this condition: whereas everyone must at the same time realize that slaves live in every respect more happily and in greater security than the modern worker, and that the work done by slaves is very little work compared with that done by the ‘worker’. One protests in the name of ‘human dignity’: but that, expressed more simply, is that precious vanity which feels being unequal, being publicly rated lower, as the hardest lot. — The Cynic thinks differently, because he despises honour: — and thus Diogenes was for a time a slave and private tutor. (1.457)

    He who directs his passion upon causes (the sciences, the common weal, cultural interests, the arts) deprives his passion for people of much of its fire. (1.487)

    Young people love what is strange and interesting, regardless of whether it is true or false. More mature spirits love in truth that which is strange and interesting in it. Heads fully mature, finally, love truth also where it appears plain and simple and is boring to ordinary people: they have noticed that truth is accustomed to impart its highest spiritual possessions with an air of simplicity. (1.609)

    The tone in which young people speak, praise, blame, poeticise displeases their elders because it is too loud and yet at the same time hollow and indistinct, like a sound in a vaunt that acquires such volume through the emptiness surrounding it: for most of what young people think does not proceed from the abundance of their own nature but is a resonance and echo of what has been thought, said praised, and blamed in their presence. (1.613)

    Belief in truth begins with doubt as to all truths believed hitherto. (2.1.20)

    At all times arrogance has rightly been designated the ‘vice of the intellectual’—yet without the motive power of this vice truth and the respect accorded to it would be miserable accommodated on this earth. (2.1.26)

    Farce of many of the industrious.—Through an excess of exertion they gain for themselves time, and afterwards have no idea what to do with it except to count the hours until is has expired. (2.1.47)

    Every good book is written for a definite reader and those like him, and for just this reason will be viewed unfavourably by all other readers, the great majority: which is why its reputation rests on a narrow basis and can be erected only slowly—The mediocre and bad book is so because it tries to please many and does please them. (2.1.158)

    They themselves are not educated: how should they be able to educate? (2.1.181)

    We can distinguish five grades of traveller: those of the first and lowest grade are those who travel and, instead of seeing, are themselves seen—they are as though blind; next come those who actually see the world; the third experience something as a consequence of what they have seen; the fourth absorb into themselves what they have experienced and bear it away with them; lastly there re a few men of the highest energy whom after they have experienced and absorbed all they have seen, necessarily have to body it forth again out of themselves in works and actions as soon as they have returned home—It is like these five species of traveller that all men travel through the whole journey of life, the lowest purely passive, the highest those who transform into action and exhaust everything they experience. (2.1.228)

    Of him who surrenders himself to events there remains less and less. (2.1.315)

    What significance can we then accord the press as it is now, with its daily expenses diture of lung power on exclaiming, deafening, inciting, shocling—is it anything more than the permanent false alarm that leads ears and senses off in the wrong direction? (2.1.321)

    The bad acquires esteem by being imitated, the good loses it—especially in art. (2.1.381)

    We possess the conscience of an industrious age: and this conscience does not permit us to bestow our best hours and mornings on art, however grand and worthy this art may be,. To us art counts as a leisure, a recreational activity: we devote to it the remnants of our time and energies. (2.2.170)

    A little garden, figs, little cheeses and in addition three or four good friends—these were the sensual pleasures of Epicurus. (2.2.192)

    An excellent quotation can annihilate entire pages, indeed an entire book, in that it warns the reader and seems to cry out to him: ‘Beware, I am the jewel and around me there is lead, pallid, ignominious lead!’ Every word, every idea, wants to dwell only in its own company: that is the moral of high style. (2.2.111)

  9. Hatebeams Hatebeams says:

    My copy was stolen before I could finish, but I did get at least as far as aphorism 201 - and what a gem it is! I keep a copy in my workstation at all times and will transcribe it here. I edited the text a little for extra venom (not usually necessary with FWN!).


    201
    Bad writers necessary. There will always have to be bad writers, for they reflect the taste of CRETINS who have needs as much as the mature do. If human life were longer, there would be more of the individuals who have matured than of the CRETINS, or at least as many. But as it is, the great majority ARE CRETINS which means there are always many more undeveloped intellects with bad taste. Moreover, these people demand satisfaction of their needs with the greater vehemence of CRETINS and they force the existence of bad authors.


    Don't say it ain't so!

  10. Dan Dan says:

    Re-read: Jan 26-Feb 4, 2017

    This would not be among my top choices if I were looking through Nietzsche's works for a beach read--for that, I would want a copy of Zarathustra, The Gay Science or Twilight of the Idols. No, this one I see as something you might read on the commuter train to work or during your lunch break or in that quiet that forms when the party's over and everyone has gone home.

    Nor do I think this book is the best introduction to Nietzsche's work. A number of themes closely associated with Nietzsche's thought, such as the the will to power, the genealogy of morals and even the concept of the Ubermensch emerge from his discussion in Human, All Too Human, but here they often appear to be in a looser and more rudimentary form, whereas in his later books the same concepts seem much more fully thought out, and more effectively expressed.

    As with many of his other books, here Nietzsche's thought might be termed post-metaphysical. That is, in terms of his philosophical argumentation in Human, All Too Human, Nietzsche does not stoop to disproving metaphysics, but assumes that it has already been disproven, and that this is the case for his reader as well.

    In Beyond Good and Evil, Nietzsche writes It has gradually become clear to me what every great philosophy up till now has consisted of--namely, the confession of its originator, and a species of involuntary and unconscious autobiography... This seems particularly fitting with regard to Human, All Too Human, which, as Marion Faber's introduction points out, was written while Nietzsche was breaking with Richard Wagner, with Schopenhauerian philosophy, and as he had taken up residence with a friend, psychologist Paul Ree. Each of these concerns are reflected in the book, which includes aphorisms explicitly attacking Schopenhauer, others implicitly attacking Wagner, and still others in which Nietzsche comments on Ree's De l'origine des sentiments moraux and on the science of psychology in general.

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