Paperback è The Redbreast PDF/EPUB Þ

Paperback è The Redbreast PDF/EPUB Þ


The Redbreast ❰PDF / Epub❯ ☁ The Redbreast Author Jo Nesbø – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk The Redbreast is a fabulous introduction to Nesb s tough as nails series protagonist, Oslo police detective Harry Hole A brilliant and epic novel, breathtaking in its scope and design winner of The Gl The Redbreast is a fabulous introduction to Nesb s tough as nails series protagonist, Oslo police detective Harry Hole A brilliant and epic novel, breathtaking in its scope and design winner of The Glass Key for best Nordic crime novel and selected as the best Norwegian crime novel ever written by members of Norway s book clubs The Redbreast is a chilling tale of murder and betrayal that ranges from the battlefields of World War Two to the streets of modern day Oslo Follow Hole as he races to stop a killer and disarm a ticking time bomb from his nation s shadowy past Vogue magazine says that nobody can delve into the dark, twisted mind of a murderer better than a Scandinavian thriller writer and nobody does it better than Jo Nesb James Patterson fans should also take note.

  • Paperback
  • 519 pages
  • The Redbreast
  • Jo Nesbø
  • English
  • 13 May 2019
  • 184343217X

About the Author: Jo Nesbø

Jo Nesb is a bestselling Norwegian author and musician He was born in Oslo and grew up in Molde Nesb graduated from the Norwegian School of Economics with a degree in economics Nesb is primarily famous for his crime novels about Detective Harry Hole, but he is also the main vocals and songwriter for the Norwegian rock band Di Derre In Nesb also released his first children s book, Doktor Proktors PrompepulverSeries Harry Hole Doktor ProktorFor exclusive content about Jo Nesb and his books, register for the official fan newsletter.



10 thoughts on “The Redbreast

  1. Lyn Lyn says:

    Jo Nesbo ups his game Way up.The third of Nesbo s Harry Hole novels, this one published in 2000 In my review of the second novel, Cockroaches, I opined that as good a writer as Nesbo is, his best work lay in the future.Every now and then I am right about something and this time I was, The Redbreast is head and shoulders above his previous two books This is inspired, confident and mature almost as if he were shrugging off his Journeyman title and moving towards the ranks of master writer.And Jo Nesbo ups his game Way up.The third of Nesbo s Harry Hole novels, this one published in 2000 In my review of the second novel, Cockroaches, I opined that as good a writer as Nesbo is, his best work lay in the future.Every now and then I am right about something and this time I was, The Redbreast is head and shoulders above his previous two books This is inspired, confident and mature almost as if he were shrugging off his Journeyman title and moving towards the ranks of master writer.And The Bat and Cockroaches were both good books, both introducing a charismatic protagonist and told a good story, making a reader want to come back.The Redbreast is even better.Set in and around Oslo we find Harry Hole stumbling and bumbling through his career Nesbo has drawn Hole as a very real hero, with bumps and ugly problems which is somewhat clich as this kind of lead character seems prerequisite for a crime novel the tough but tortured loner cop out on the edge, driven by his own demons and suffering under bureaucratic and legal obstacles that keep him from doing what is right but he has also created in Hole a very likable and approachable protagonist, a lead actor whom the reader can get behind.In John Steinbeck s wonderful 1942 short work The Moon Is Down, we are introduced to the Nazi invasion of Norway and are given to the idea of a united Norwegian front against the invaders Nesbo and history tells a different,complicated story Some Norwegians joined the Germans, fought alongside the Nazis in bright green uniforms, were cheered as keeping out the invading Russians It is in thiscomplex field of competing loyalties that Nesbo illuminates and enthralls.Nesbo tells The Redbreast in two alternating story lines, Hole s present day investigations into neo Nazi murders, and a second narrative from 1944 along the Eastern German front, in the trenches surrounding Leningrad Nesbo weaves these two narratives into a plot structure that slowly grows together and draws in several interconnected sub plots, blending group dynamics and character interactions into a denouement that is profound and mesmerizing.A very, very good book and highly recommended 2019 addendum I ve read several of these and still believe The Redbreast is his best

  2. Bibliophile Bibliophile says:

    The Redbreast is actually the third of Jo Nesb s detective novels featuring the alcoholic Harry Hole who is on the wagon for most of this particular novel , but alas, it was the first to be translated into English Nevertheless, it works fine as a standalone, though the impact of one particular event might have been greater had we been able to read about the character in the two previous novels Anyway back to The Redbreast, which involves Nazis, both Old Skoole and Neo , a couple of touch The Redbreast is actually the third of Jo Nesb s detective novels featuring the alcoholic Harry Hole who is on the wagon for most of this particular novel , but alas, it was the first to be translated into English Nevertheless, it works fine as a standalone, though the impact of one particular event might have been greater had we been able to read about the character in the two previous novels Anyway back to The Redbreast, which involves Nazis, both Old Skoole and Neo , a couple of touching love stories, mistaken identities, corrupt police officers and a marvelous and beautifully written evocation of wartime on the Russian Front during World War II Though perhaps there are occasions where Nesb relies a tiny bit too much on coincidence, this is a fantastic mystery I was kept guessing until the very last page and I had to read this lengthy novel quite compulsively until I finished it One particular mystery that we, the readers, know the answer to is not actually solved in the book, so clearly it will be a theme for later I seem to read a great deal of Scandinavian crime fiction, but The Redbreast really stood out for me in terms of plot, character development, and writing style I know I am reading everything in translation, but Nesb s writing seems far, farelegant and crisp than Henning Mankell s for example, and it is miles away from the total infelicity of Stieg Larsson s efforts which I always felt would have been best served by some seriously tough love in the editing department Indeed, because there was a similar sort of Nazi subplot in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, I couldn t help but mentally compare that novel to this one, and yet again, I cannot fathom the undeserved popularity of the Larsson books compared to something like this which is actually well written, has believable characters and a plot that makes sense Nesb manages to stay away from the tedious accumulation of unnecessary detail of which both Larsson and Mankell are guilty all of his characters seem like real people, rather than random collections of cliched plot devices, and wonder of wonders, Harry doesn t actually solve one of the biggest mysteries of the story Indeed, he only solves the main plot because the criminal wants him to, as opposed to all those amateur detectives who solve cases that have baffled the professionals for years yes, I AM looking at you Mikael Blomqvist.In short, highly highly recommended for everyone who likes their mysteries Nordic, their characters fascinating and their writing excellent

  3. Harry Harry says:

    Here s the thing about the recent popularity of Scandinavian writers and if you re a Nordic Thriller aficionado you couldn t care less about the distinction the novels are depressed, somber, filled with ennui, a lack of humor, with flawed characters if not suffused with a strong tendency towards determinism in short, whether you re reading Stieg Larsson, Henning Mankell, or Jo Nesbo you are likely reading Literary Naturalism If you live in Scandinavia you might consider this par for the cours Here s the thing about the recent popularity of Scandinavian writers and if you re a Nordic Thriller aficionado you couldn t care less about the distinction the novels are depressed, somber, filled with ennui, a lack of humor, with flawed characters if not suffused with a strong tendency towards determinism in short, whether you re reading Stieg Larsson, Henning Mankell, or Jo Nesbo you are likely reading Literary Naturalism If you live in Scandinavia you might consider this par for the course, ennui is imbued into the populace as it is also reflected in the works of prominent Russian writers Anna Karenina comes to mind Just as we continue to struggle here in the States with our history of slavery and the resulting racial tensions, so do Europe and Scandinavia struggle in coming to terms with Nazism and the Bolshevik revolution More than a few reviewers have expressed their dissatisfaction with the Nordic writers pre occupation with Nazism And yet, the rise in popularity of these Nordic thrillers here in the States is puzzling given our strong tendency towards literary Romanticism We like for the good guys to win, we like emotion, we like our heroes as opposed to anti heroes we enjoy free will, and in general consider ourselves in control of our own lives.Having said that there is excellence in Literary Naturalism The above doesn t mean we can t enjoy a well written novel, an intriguing mystery, a flawed anti hero, a well crafted story written in the style of literary Naturalism It doesn t mean we can t enjoy the works of Jo Nesbo I did.In Jo Nesbo s wordsI come from a family of readers and story tellersWith a librarian mother and a father who sat before the fire and told the kids stories they wanted to hear each repetition bringing something new to the tale Jo s foundation was carved in stone Again, in his own life story we sense the determinism filtering into his life he wanted to be a soccer star but an injury put a quick stop to this with a dreadful feeling of fate guiding his life he entered the military in the hopes something would happen what happened was Self Discipline thinking he might want to be an economist he entered the world of finance which he abandoned as well someone told him he could play guitar he only knew 3 chords and he formed several bands, Di Derre being the most successful and finally he wrote on an airplane to begin with and he never stopped The Redbreast is Jo Nesbo s third Harry Hole pronounced Hooleh novel the other two not being translated for a US audience as of yet and is Nesbo s claim to fame So, this is where we start Yes, the books should be read in order For an American audience, Harry Hole can be likened to Harry Bosch he defies authority, is an outcast within his own organization, is best left alone to do this job his office is at the end of the hall , isof an anti hero than a hero, has trouble with his romantic life, lives alone, has a fierce propensity for justice as opposed to the Law and once let loose is like a pit bull with a bone fastened to his jaws But perhaps the most compelling reason why Harry Hole has such a following is Nesbo s devastating characterization of what exactly comprises a flawed hero Upon reflection, American hard boiled writers don t come close to accomplishing the same This is not too dissimilar to the way Nesbo sees himself Bjarne M ller, my former boss, says people like me always choose the line of most resistance It s in what he calls our accursed nature That s why we always end up on our own I don t know I like being alone Perhaps I have grown to like my self image of being a loner, too.I think you have to find something about yourself that you like in order to survive Some people say being alone is unsociable and selfish But you re independent and you don t drag others down with you, if that s the way you re heading Many people are afraid of being alone But it made me feel strong, free and invulnerable.Andah, yes, there is the matter of plot So how do we justify this decided streak of fate determinism within the novels with Nesbo s apparent mastery of plot The two seemingly ought to contradict each other On the one hand, we have Nesbo s almost Shakespearean tendency to cast characters as marionette puppets on the strings of fate the very opposite of plot , while on the other hand we are riveted by the very complex actions and reactions made by Harry Hole during his investigations Nesbo is a master at not adding anything superfluous to his novels Perhaps it is an unholy marriage between the two that transfixes us His plots are intricate, very complex, the seemingly irrelevant details exposed throughout the novels become larger than life as the story closes, and they can weave through time, forward and backward, as the story unfolds But, with a little alacrity, we can remember we are reading Naturalism and so it isn t always Harry Hole making events happen, but rather the reverse, it is the events that move Harry Hole Again, it is a matter of preference but in Nesbo s case it is done with utter expertise as a writer.The exposition setting is often Scandinavia the weather is somber, the descriptions grey like, the people absorbed with alcohol and withdrawn, if not bundled and sequestered And yet, the dialogue and scenes are full of references to other millieus , continents, languages, and cleverly hidden philosophical references that speak to a widely cultured audience as opposed to American writers of this genre who rarely venture beyond the borders of their land, if not their own State And as with plot, there are no superfluous details Everything in the novels matters and Nesbo does not forget even the tiniest detail to which he s made a seemingly furtive reference earlier on in the story This is one of the biggest reasons why I love Jo Nesbo.I thoroughly enjoyed Jo Nesbo s The Redbreast and am currently reading the remaining Harry Hole novels I remain intrigued by events left undone such as the fate of our undiscovered villain in this and other stories You ll just have to read the novels to find out .Oh, yes, as with other series this review is likely to be repeated for all unless there is a drastic divergence from what I have written here So, if you ve read this review, you ve read em all Enjoy

  4. Arah-Lynda Arah-Lynda says:

    According to goodreads alone, 7800 people gave this on average, 3.8 stars.I should have liked this, but to be honest it was a struggle for me to even finish.The story seems fractured, moving as it does, between two different time periods, the latter days of WWII and present day Oslo.Nesbo writes with the kind of authority that assumes every reader would be familiar with the history of Norway and why Norwegians were mixed up with the Germans on the Eastern Front I kept looking, lo these many pag According to goodreads alone, 7800 people gave this on average, 3.8 stars.I should have liked this, but to be honest it was a struggle for me to even finish.The story seems fractured, moving as it does, between two different time periods, the latter days of WWII and present day Oslo.Nesbo writes with the kind of authority that assumes every reader would be familiar with the history of Norway and why Norwegians were mixed up with the Germans on the Eastern Front I kept looking, lo these many pages, for a character that I liked or didn t, for that matter I was looking for someone to connect to I finally found one in Ellen, but sigh we see and hear way too little of her.For me it all got confusing.It gave me a headache.I put it down.And read another book a good one I picked this back up.The last 100 pages were good and I read them quite quickly.Still too little, too late.More bitter than sweet

  5. Edward Lorn Edward Lorn says:

    There might be spoilers in the comments because this is one of those books you ll want to talk about with friends.I have it on good authority waves at Thomas that Harry Hole s last name doesn t rhyme with goal But who are we kidding We re gonna laugh and snicker every time I mention Harry Hole in this review so go ahead and get it out of your systems Harry Hole BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA Sorry to anybody I may have offended by being a dumb American Speaking of being a dumb American, some of y There might be spoilers in the comments because this is one of those books you ll want to talk about with friends.I have it on good authority waves at Thomas that Harry Hole s last name doesn t rhyme with goal But who are we kidding We re gonna laugh and snicker every time I mention Harry Hole in this review so go ahead and get it out of your systems Harry Hole BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA Sorry to anybody I may have offended by being a dumb American Speaking of being a dumb American, some of you might remember that, last time on E Reviews, I said Herman Koch was Norwegian, but homedude is actually Dutch Well, I did my research this time and I m pretty sure that Jo Nesb is not Dutch Pretty sure he s Australian I just pissed off a fuckload of people lol Anyballs, before we get started with this review, I mma drop some knowledge on you Did you know that holding your ALT key and typing 0248 will get you that nifty O with the slash through it Here, look holds ALT and types 0248 SELF DESTRUCT INITIATED.Well, fuckOkay Balls Um On with the review, I guess.There s a damn good reason Jo Nesb s The Redbreast was chosen by the Gods of Literature for translation into English Not Americanese, but actual English, as witnessed by the single quotation mark and not the double Also, there s a bunch of U s in places there shouldn t be honour, colour and a few S s instead of Z s realise and such Have I upset enough people yet Yes, there are two books before this one in the Harry Hole series and they have since been translated as well, but The Redbreast was the first to be translated No, I have not read the first two books, and from what I ve heard you don t have to start with them A little birdie told me waves at Tigus that I should start with The Redbreast, because it begins a loose trilogy And that s what I did I did not feel like I had missed anything It felt like I was reading a first in a series So how do I know that there s a good reason The Redbreast was translated Well, because it rocks That s why The Redbreast has multiple timelines and a large cast, so if that kind of thing dries up your nu nu, maybe pass on this book But if that sort of shizzle turns your underdrawers into a splash pad, well I suggest you read this motherfucker I dig all that shit Hopping back and forth between past and present Mm hm Jumping to a different POV almost every chapter Oh yeah, baby Plot twists Somebody get me a towel I will say that, close to the end, maybe the last fifty pages or so, I was as confused as a panda with a mirror Am I white Am I black Am I asian Does it matter What is life I m hungry, yo Where the leaves at But everything became clear I m not going to spoil anything for you because the explanation for how the twist works is ingenious If you read this book or if you already have we ll talk in the comments Now you know why I started the review off the way I did The last ten pages are grade A thriller material A race to the finish that had me hanging off the bed in my anxiety But, overall, this entire book is a lot of fun I d definitely recommend this one to anybody who loves a well told story.In summation Harry Hole is a damn fun character to run around after I can t wait to jump intoof his adventures Oh, and in case you re wondering, I gave this four instead of five because I m leaving room for improvement Not quite fanboying, but I can see myself leaning in that direction.Final Judgment This book is the bomb Shit, I forgot about the SELF DEST Hehehe I m so fucking cheesy Later, guys and gals.

  6. James Thane James Thane says:

    Jo Nesbo may be the best Scandinavian crime fiction writer going these days He s created in Detective Harry Hole an interesting, deeply flawed protagonist who may remind American readers of Michael Connelly s Harry Bosch The Redbreast is the third novel to feature Hole, and it s a complex story that moves back and forth between the Second World War and the turn of the Twenty First Century In the earlier action, a group of Norwegian soldiers are fighting for Hitler s Germany on the Eastern Fro Jo Nesbo may be the best Scandinavian crime fiction writer going these days He s created in Detective Harry Hole an interesting, deeply flawed protagonist who may remind American readers of Michael Connelly s Harry Bosch The Redbreast is the third novel to feature Hole, and it s a complex story that moves back and forth between the Second World War and the turn of the Twenty First Century In the earlier action, a group of Norwegian soldiers are fighting for Hitler s Germany on the Eastern Front The tide of the war is turning against them casualties are increasing, and the ties among the men are tested severely One of the Norwegian soldiers winds up wounded in a hospital where he falls in love with a beautiful nurse and begins a romance that will reverberate through the next fifty years.In the present day actually, 1999 and 2000 Oslo Detective Inspector Harry Hole makes a tragic, if unavoidable mistake For this, and to save the government from being embarrassed, he is promoted into the Security Service He becomes involved in an investigation of the neo Nazis who are active in Oslo One of them, a thug named Sverre Olsen, has been recently acquitted of a brutal assault on a small technicality, but clearly other crimes are in the works.Along the way, Harry discovers that someone in Oslo has recently come into possession of a very rare and extremely expensive sniper s rifle He has no idea who the owner is, or what he intends to do with the rifle Harry only knows that this can t possibly be good.As Hole tries to track down the rifle and figure out what the neo Nazis are up to, the two story lines collide, leading to a great climax The story is very well told the characters are fully developed, and the suspense is virtually non stop Any reader of crime fiction is almost certain to enjoy it.A word of caution If you are interested in reading any of Nesbo s Harry Hole books, it is critically important that you read them in order There are developments in each of the books, particularly regarding the characters, that will spoil a good deal of the suspense if you read the books out of sequence

  7. Matt Matt says:

    With Harry Hole focussing his attention on Norwegian soil, Nesb brings the third book in the series to the writer s attention After a heroic act during a political summit, Hole is promoted to inspector and moved to the POT, a security directorate In his new role, Hole begins an investigation into rumours that a high powered rifle has been brought into the country and may be used in an assassination attempt of some sort Working in conjunction with his former partner, Ellen, they discover that With Harry Hole focussing his attention on Norwegian soil, Nesb brings the third book in the series to the writer s attention After a heroic act during a political summit, Hole is promoted to inspector and moved to the POT, a security directorate In his new role, Hole begins an investigation into rumours that a high powered rifle has been brought into the country and may be used in an assassination attempt of some sort Working in conjunction with his former partner, Ellen, they discover that all roads lead back to a man named the Prince , though Hole is unable to uncover this individual s real identity Ellen inadvertently stumbles upon a major clue, but is attacked before she can pass it along to Hole, who grasps at any clue he can to close the case At this same time, Hole becomes involved with a colleague, Rakel, and her son, Oleg This relationship blooms and fades throughout the novel, as Hole tries to synthesise all that is going on in his professional and personal lives Alongside this storyline, Nesb tells a tale of a handful of Norwegian soldiers who chose to fight with the Reich after Norway s capture by German forces in World War II These men and their lives weave a complex story that spans sixty years, one which eventually pulls Hole into the centre, as the soldiers are being murdered, one by one Who is the Prince and how does it tie into the rifle imported from South Africa Will Rakel be a new addiction that Hole cannot shake Will these traitorous soldiers ever be safe in the country on which they turned their backs Nesb has answers, but also a handfulquestions, for the reader, as the novel takes turns never seen in the series to date A must read by all series Harry Hole fans, thought its depth and complexities leave the previous two novels in the proverbial dust.There is no question why or how Nesb won significant awards for this novel Its complexities and detailed plot lines make this a stellar piece of writing, no matter the language in which it is read Nesb finally shows off how Scandinavian writing is so muchnuanced and complex, and forces the reader to dig deeper to pull out all the clues to craft a successful thriller Hole and his character receive a multi faceted exploration, alongside a rich and controversial historical review of Norway at the height of World War II Nesb adds a number of characters whose importance will become apparent in subsequent novels so I have heard and does so in a fluid manner, setting the scene for some Oslo based mysteries, rather than flitting off to the vast reaches of the globe While the historical story seemed to drag at times, its importance becomes readily apparent as the climax of the novel approaches and the patient reader will be rewarded for the delay A thoroughly stunning piece of work that has breathed new life into the series for me and those who have come to respect Harry Hole up to this point No matter what his past has shown, Hole is a man who has muchto show and with sevennovels, Nesb has the time to peel away new layers to entice his fans.Kudos Mr Nesb for this novel that does not give up from the beginning until the final sentence You are to be applauded for your hard work and significant effort.Like hate the review An ever growing collection of others appears at

  8. Marty Marty says:

    I m quitting after four chapters There have been four different scenes, a couple dozen characters and at least two dates out of time sequentially I HATE books written this way Hate them I already don t remember the characters I don t remember which character goes with which scene I don t want the first chapter preview of things yet to come Mysteries are supposed to have confusing plots, not generate confusion by having the chapters in random order I m done with books written this way a I m quitting after four chapters There have been four different scenes, a couple dozen characters and at least two dates out of time sequentially I HATE books written this way Hate them I already don t remember the characters I don t remember which character goes with which scene I don t want the first chapter preview of things yet to come Mysteries are supposed to have confusing plots, not generate confusion by having the chapters in random order I m done with books written this way and authors who write this way I do not read as an exercise to see how many scenes and minor characters my short term memory can hold I do not read to see if my brain can sort chapters presented out of sequence I want a character I can identify with I operate in a universe in which time moves monotonically forward

  9. Ginger Ginger says:

    Fantastic I must love Norwegian mysteries and flawed detectives Going with 4.0 4.5 stars on this one The Redbreast is the 3rd book in the Harry Hole series and I really enjoyed this one I think you can read this as a stand alone because I haven t read books, 1 The Bat 2 Cockroaches.I read The Redbreast for my book club selection for July I m really happy they picked this mystery because it was complex, suspenseful and I enjoyed it all the way through.Thanks Terry for joining me in a bud Fantastic I must love Norwegian mysteries and flawed detectives Going with 4.0 4.5 stars on this one The Redbreast is the 3rd book in the Harry Hole series and I really enjoyed this one I think you can read this as a stand alone because I haven t read books, 1 The Bat 2 Cockroaches.I read The Redbreast for my book club selection for July I m really happy they picked this mystery because it was complex, suspenseful and I enjoyed it all the way through.Thanks Terry for joining me in a buddy read for this It was evenfun to share the WWII madness and Neo Nazi craziness with you.The book starts off with Harry Hole embarrassing the force not really, but politics is a bitch and he s been reassigned to do simple surveillance tasks He comes across a high powered rifle being bought on the black market It s the type of rifle that can be traced back to WWII that was used by Nazi soldiers and allies to Germany.What s up with this type of rifle being brought into Oslo, Norway under questionable circumstances What s it got to do with Neo Nazi activities And this is the beginning of a slow burn with a fantastic ending There s the mystery of the soldiers fighting on the Eastern Front between Russia and German Allies Norway at the time was invaded by Germany and they were sending Norwegian men to the front lines When the war was over, these men came back as traitors to their country.I ve got to say, I really enjoyed the past to present format in this book I love how it kept progressing the mystery of the men fighting in 1944 and to present time with Harry Hole trying to figure out Neo Nazi conspiracies and motives.I really didn t see the plot twists or who was behind the killings until Joe Nesblaid it all out for me at the end Fantastic writing for me not to figure out a thing Definitely recommend this to crime detective fans and people who love Norwegian mysteries Stick with it though if you can handle the slow burn It delivers in the end

  10. Algernon (Darth Anyan) Algernon (Darth Anyan) says:

    7 10 There s nothing wrong with this Scandinavian crime thriller, possibly the most popular of its category in recent years Yet its technical achievements pacing, characterization, research, atmosphere, etc may have been what kept me being fully emotionally involved in the story With a few exceptions of great character sketches, the story felt contrived and to clever for its own good I would even go so far as call the plot forgettable if it were not for the numerous flashbacks to the World 7 10 There s nothing wrong with this Scandinavian crime thriller, possibly the most popular of its category in recent years Yet its technical achievements pacing, characterization, research, atmosphere, etc may have been what kept me being fully emotionally involved in the story With a few exceptions of great character sketches, the story felt contrived and to clever for its own good I would even go so far as call the plot forgettable if it were not for the numerous flashbacks to the World War II seeds of the current crisis.The feeling I m just along for the ride, with a big bag of popcorn beside me started with the prologue, and continued to the last page We meet Harry Hole in my case for the first time, because I skipped his first two novels in the series as a burned out policeman, a bag of nerves that manages to shoot at a friendly target during a US presidential visit to Oslo In order to avoid an international scandal, his superiors promote him to a special investigations desk, where instead of laying down quietly, he starts tracking the links between skinhead gangs violence, the purchase of a very exensive sniper rifle and resentments inherited from past collaborations of Norwegians with the Nazis in WWII.Now for the good stuff Harry is a great choice for the main character of a multi volume series He is flawed, depressive, introspective, vulnerable in his personal life, a loner among his colleagues Yet we see under all the darkness the flashes of a sunnier core, in his friendly bantering with his partner Ellen, in his tentative wooing of a woman he interviews during his investigations The sense of humour is so muchprecious and hard won, given his post traumatic stress I feel I should read at lest the two preques, to give him a better chance of winning me overBorn in 1965 You look older than that, Inspector Hole Bad genes Bad luck for you Well, they let me into eighteen certificate films when I was fourteen I laugh from tie to time, But Harry s song is sung moe often than not in a key of sadness view spoiler I was angry beyond words at the killing of Ellen, a gratuitous tug on my sympathy after putting a lot of hope in her continued presence in the series as a counterweight to Harry s morbid apathy hide spoilerEllen had said he lacked natural buoyancy, or whatever it was that meant most people could struggle to the surface again After his return from Bangkok he had been down for so long that he had considered giving up ever returning to the surface Everything had been cold and dark, and all his impressions were somehow dulled As if he were deeply immersed in water It had been so wonderfully quiet When people talked to him the words had been like bubbles of air coming out of their mouths, hurrying upwards and awaythe controversy surrounding the role of Norwegians collaborators in WWII, and how history is rewritten by the victors, creating resentments and pushing waves of hatred far into the future, is a better andoriginal anchor to the novel than the terrorist with a big gun cliche The historical flashbacks to the siege of Leningrad, to a hospital in Vienna, or to Hamburg after carpet bombing, worked much better for me thn the contemporary pieceswriting the history that the authorities felt postwar Norway deserved By keeping quiet about the widespread collaboration with the Germans and focusing on the little resistance there was For instance, Juul devotes five pages to the sinking of the Blucher on the night leading to 9 April in his history book, but he quietly ignores the fact that prosecutions against almost 100,000 Norwegians were being considered at the trials And it worked The myths of a Norwegian population fighting shoulder to shoulder against Nazism live on todayin line with other Scandinavian writers, Nesbo is aware and skillful in weaving together the individual with the larger social problems of his time Harry Hole s depression is rooted not only in his personal experiences in Australia and Bangkok, but also in the existential alienation of the modern man To the issue of Nazi collaboration we can add the Israelo Palestinian conflict, the Apartheid regime in South Africa, digs at the Russian and American superpower claims andA poster in his derelict apartment quotes BjornebeeAnd this acceleration in the production of horsepower is again just one expression of acceleration in our understanding of the so called laws of nature This understanding angstIt may be a secondary plot in the novel, but once again, for me it wasimportant that the race to stop the killer the abuse of women read rape by men in a position of authority One case in Vienna in 1942 is echoed by another one in Oslo in 1999, almost mirror like One sadist gets his just deserves, the other s fate is left out for a sequel.In conclusion maybe the novel deserves a better rating than my three and a half stars, but I was a bit disappointed in the predictable ending and a few loose ends Harry Hole is a great protagonist, and I may rate his higher after I read the two prequels I skipped Recommended for fans of Nordic crime novels

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10 thoughts on “The Redbreast

  1. Lyn Lyn says:

    Jo Nesbo ups his game Way up.The third of Nesbo s Harry Hole novels, this one published in 2000 In my review of the second novel, Cockroaches, I opined that as good a writer as Nesbo is, his best work lay in the future.Every now and then I am right about something and this time I was, The Redbreast is head and shoulders above his previous two books This is inspired, confident and mature almost as if he were shrugging off his Journeyman title and moving towards the ranks of master writer.And Jo Nesbo ups his game Way up.The third of Nesbo s Harry Hole novels, this one published in 2000 In my review of the second novel, Cockroaches, I opined that as good a writer as Nesbo is, his best work lay in the future.Every now and then I am right about something and this time I was, The Redbreast is head and shoulders above his previous two books This is inspired, confident and mature almost as if he were shrugging off his Journeyman title and moving towards the ranks of master writer.And The Bat and Cockroaches were both good books, both introducing a charismatic protagonist and told a good story, making a reader want to come back.The Redbreast is even better.Set in and around Oslo we find Harry Hole stumbling and bumbling through his career Nesbo has drawn Hole as a very real hero, with bumps and ugly problems which is somewhat clich as this kind of lead character seems prerequisite for a crime novel the tough but tortured loner cop out on the edge, driven by his own demons and suffering under bureaucratic and legal obstacles that keep him from doing what is right but he has also created in Hole a very likable and approachable protagonist, a lead actor whom the reader can get behind.In John Steinbeck s wonderful 1942 short work The Moon Is Down, we are introduced to the Nazi invasion of Norway and are given to the idea of a united Norwegian front against the invaders Nesbo and history tells a different,complicated story Some Norwegians joined the Germans, fought alongside the Nazis in bright green uniforms, were cheered as keeping out the invading Russians It is in thiscomplex field of competing loyalties that Nesbo illuminates and enthralls.Nesbo tells The Redbreast in two alternating story lines, Hole s present day investigations into neo Nazi murders, and a second narrative from 1944 along the Eastern German front, in the trenches surrounding Leningrad Nesbo weaves these two narratives into a plot structure that slowly grows together and draws in several interconnected sub plots, blending group dynamics and character interactions into a denouement that is profound and mesmerizing.A very, very good book and highly recommended 2019 addendum I ve read several of these and still believe The Redbreast is his best

  2. Bibliophile Bibliophile says:

    The Redbreast is actually the third of Jo Nesb s detective novels featuring the alcoholic Harry Hole who is on the wagon for most of this particular novel , but alas, it was the first to be translated into English Nevertheless, it works fine as a standalone, though the impact of one particular event might have been greater had we been able to read about the character in the two previous novels Anyway back to The Redbreast, which involves Nazis, both Old Skoole and Neo , a couple of touch The Redbreast is actually the third of Jo Nesb s detective novels featuring the alcoholic Harry Hole who is on the wagon for most of this particular novel , but alas, it was the first to be translated into English Nevertheless, it works fine as a standalone, though the impact of one particular event might have been greater had we been able to read about the character in the two previous novels Anyway back to The Redbreast, which involves Nazis, both Old Skoole and Neo , a couple of touching love stories, mistaken identities, corrupt police officers and a marvelous and beautifully written evocation of wartime on the Russian Front during World War II Though perhaps there are occasions where Nesb relies a tiny bit too much on coincidence, this is a fantastic mystery I was kept guessing until the very last page and I had to read this lengthy novel quite compulsively until I finished it One particular mystery that we, the readers, know the answer to is not actually solved in the book, so clearly it will be a theme for later I seem to read a great deal of Scandinavian crime fiction, but The Redbreast really stood out for me in terms of plot, character development, and writing style I know I am reading everything in translation, but Nesb s writing seems far, farelegant and crisp than Henning Mankell s for example, and it is miles away from the total infelicity of Stieg Larsson s efforts which I always felt would have been best served by some seriously tough love in the editing department Indeed, because there was a similar sort of Nazi subplot in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, I couldn t help but mentally compare that novel to this one, and yet again, I cannot fathom the undeserved popularity of the Larsson books compared to something like this which is actually well written, has believable characters and a plot that makes sense Nesb manages to stay away from the tedious accumulation of unnecessary detail of which both Larsson and Mankell are guilty all of his characters seem like real people, rather than random collections of cliched plot devices, and wonder of wonders, Harry doesn t actually solve one of the biggest mysteries of the story Indeed, he only solves the main plot because the criminal wants him to, as opposed to all those amateur detectives who solve cases that have baffled the professionals for years yes, I AM looking at you Mikael Blomqvist.In short, highly highly recommended for everyone who likes their mysteries Nordic, their characters fascinating and their writing excellent

  3. Harry Harry says:

    Here s the thing about the recent popularity of Scandinavian writers and if you re a Nordic Thriller aficionado you couldn t care less about the distinction the novels are depressed, somber, filled with ennui, a lack of humor, with flawed characters if not suffused with a strong tendency towards determinism in short, whether you re reading Stieg Larsson, Henning Mankell, or Jo Nesbo you are likely reading Literary Naturalism If you live in Scandinavia you might consider this par for the cours Here s the thing about the recent popularity of Scandinavian writers and if you re a Nordic Thriller aficionado you couldn t care less about the distinction the novels are depressed, somber, filled with ennui, a lack of humor, with flawed characters if not suffused with a strong tendency towards determinism in short, whether you re reading Stieg Larsson, Henning Mankell, or Jo Nesbo you are likely reading Literary Naturalism If you live in Scandinavia you might consider this par for the course, ennui is imbued into the populace as it is also reflected in the works of prominent Russian writers Anna Karenina comes to mind Just as we continue to struggle here in the States with our history of slavery and the resulting racial tensions, so do Europe and Scandinavia struggle in coming to terms with Nazism and the Bolshevik revolution More than a few reviewers have expressed their dissatisfaction with the Nordic writers pre occupation with Nazism And yet, the rise in popularity of these Nordic thrillers here in the States is puzzling given our strong tendency towards literary Romanticism We like for the good guys to win, we like emotion, we like our heroes as opposed to anti heroes we enjoy free will, and in general consider ourselves in control of our own lives.Having said that there is excellence in Literary Naturalism The above doesn t mean we can t enjoy a well written novel, an intriguing mystery, a flawed anti hero, a well crafted story written in the style of literary Naturalism It doesn t mean we can t enjoy the works of Jo Nesbo I did.In Jo Nesbo s wordsI come from a family of readers and story tellersWith a librarian mother and a father who sat before the fire and told the kids stories they wanted to hear each repetition bringing something new to the tale Jo s foundation was carved in stone Again, in his own life story we sense the determinism filtering into his life he wanted to be a soccer star but an injury put a quick stop to this with a dreadful feeling of fate guiding his life he entered the military in the hopes something would happen what happened was Self Discipline thinking he might want to be an economist he entered the world of finance which he abandoned as well someone told him he could play guitar he only knew 3 chords and he formed several bands, Di Derre being the most successful and finally he wrote on an airplane to begin with and he never stopped The Redbreast is Jo Nesbo s third Harry Hole pronounced Hooleh novel the other two not being translated for a US audience as of yet and is Nesbo s claim to fame So, this is where we start Yes, the books should be read in order For an American audience, Harry Hole can be likened to Harry Bosch he defies authority, is an outcast within his own organization, is best left alone to do this job his office is at the end of the hall , isof an anti hero than a hero, has trouble with his romantic life, lives alone, has a fierce propensity for justice as opposed to the Law and once let loose is like a pit bull with a bone fastened to his jaws But perhaps the most compelling reason why Harry Hole has such a following is Nesbo s devastating characterization of what exactly comprises a flawed hero Upon reflection, American hard boiled writers don t come close to accomplishing the same This is not too dissimilar to the way Nesbo sees himself Bjarne M ller, my former boss, says people like me always choose the line of most resistance It s in what he calls our accursed nature That s why we always end up on our own I don t know I like being alone Perhaps I have grown to like my self image of being a loner, too.I think you have to find something about yourself that you like in order to survive Some people say being alone is unsociable and selfish But you re independent and you don t drag others down with you, if that s the way you re heading Many people are afraid of being alone But it made me feel strong, free and invulnerable.Andah, yes, there is the matter of plot So how do we justify this decided streak of fate determinism within the novels with Nesbo s apparent mastery of plot The two seemingly ought to contradict each other On the one hand, we have Nesbo s almost Shakespearean tendency to cast characters as marionette puppets on the strings of fate the very opposite of plot , while on the other hand we are riveted by the very complex actions and reactions made by Harry Hole during his investigations Nesbo is a master at not adding anything superfluous to his novels Perhaps it is an unholy marriage between the two that transfixes us His plots are intricate, very complex, the seemingly irrelevant details exposed throughout the novels become larger than life as the story closes, and they can weave through time, forward and backward, as the story unfolds But, with a little alacrity, we can remember we are reading Naturalism and so it isn t always Harry Hole making events happen, but rather the reverse, it is the events that move Harry Hole Again, it is a matter of preference but in Nesbo s case it is done with utter expertise as a writer.The exposition setting is often Scandinavia the weather is somber, the descriptions grey like, the people absorbed with alcohol and withdrawn, if not bundled and sequestered And yet, the dialogue and scenes are full of references to other millieus , continents, languages, and cleverly hidden philosophical references that speak to a widely cultured audience as opposed to American writers of this genre who rarely venture beyond the borders of their land, if not their own State And as with plot, there are no superfluous details Everything in the novels matters and Nesbo does not forget even the tiniest detail to which he s made a seemingly furtive reference earlier on in the story This is one of the biggest reasons why I love Jo Nesbo.I thoroughly enjoyed Jo Nesbo s The Redbreast and am currently reading the remaining Harry Hole novels I remain intrigued by events left undone such as the fate of our undiscovered villain in this and other stories You ll just have to read the novels to find out .Oh, yes, as with other series this review is likely to be repeated for all unless there is a drastic divergence from what I have written here So, if you ve read this review, you ve read em all Enjoy

  4. Arah-Lynda Arah-Lynda says:

    According to goodreads alone, 7800 people gave this on average, 3.8 stars.I should have liked this, but to be honest it was a struggle for me to even finish.The story seems fractured, moving as it does, between two different time periods, the latter days of WWII and present day Oslo.Nesbo writes with the kind of authority that assumes every reader would be familiar with the history of Norway and why Norwegians were mixed up with the Germans on the Eastern Front I kept looking, lo these many pag According to goodreads alone, 7800 people gave this on average, 3.8 stars.I should have liked this, but to be honest it was a struggle for me to even finish.The story seems fractured, moving as it does, between two different time periods, the latter days of WWII and present day Oslo.Nesbo writes with the kind of authority that assumes every reader would be familiar with the history of Norway and why Norwegians were mixed up with the Germans on the Eastern Front I kept looking, lo these many pages, for a character that I liked or didn t, for that matter I was looking for someone to connect to I finally found one in Ellen, but sigh we see and hear way too little of her.For me it all got confusing.It gave me a headache.I put it down.And read another book a good one I picked this back up.The last 100 pages were good and I read them quite quickly.Still too little, too late.More bitter than sweet

  5. Edward Lorn Edward Lorn says:

    There might be spoilers in the comments because this is one of those books you ll want to talk about with friends.I have it on good authority waves at Thomas that Harry Hole s last name doesn t rhyme with goal But who are we kidding We re gonna laugh and snicker every time I mention Harry Hole in this review so go ahead and get it out of your systems Harry Hole BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA Sorry to anybody I may have offended by being a dumb American Speaking of being a dumb American, some of y There might be spoilers in the comments because this is one of those books you ll want to talk about with friends.I have it on good authority waves at Thomas that Harry Hole s last name doesn t rhyme with goal But who are we kidding We re gonna laugh and snicker every time I mention Harry Hole in this review so go ahead and get it out of your systems Harry Hole BWAHAHAHAHAHAHA Sorry to anybody I may have offended by being a dumb American Speaking of being a dumb American, some of you might remember that, last time on E Reviews, I said Herman Koch was Norwegian, but homedude is actually Dutch Well, I did my research this time and I m pretty sure that Jo Nesb is not Dutch Pretty sure he s Australian I just pissed off a fuckload of people lol Anyballs, before we get started with this review, I mma drop some knowledge on you Did you know that holding your ALT key and typing 0248 will get you that nifty O with the slash through it Here, look holds ALT and types 0248 SELF DESTRUCT INITIATED.Well, fuckOkay Balls Um On with the review, I guess.There s a damn good reason Jo Nesb s The Redbreast was chosen by the Gods of Literature for translation into English Not Americanese, but actual English, as witnessed by the single quotation mark and not the double Also, there s a bunch of U s in places there shouldn t be honour, colour and a few S s instead of Z s realise and such Have I upset enough people yet Yes, there are two books before this one in the Harry Hole series and they have since been translated as well, but The Redbreast was the first to be translated No, I have not read the first two books, and from what I ve heard you don t have to start with them A little birdie told me waves at Tigus that I should start with The Redbreast, because it begins a loose trilogy And that s what I did I did not feel like I had missed anything It felt like I was reading a first in a series So how do I know that there s a good reason The Redbreast was translated Well, because it rocks That s why The Redbreast has multiple timelines and a large cast, so if that kind of thing dries up your nu nu, maybe pass on this book But if that sort of shizzle turns your underdrawers into a splash pad, well I suggest you read this motherfucker I dig all that shit Hopping back and forth between past and present Mm hm Jumping to a different POV almost every chapter Oh yeah, baby Plot twists Somebody get me a towel I will say that, close to the end, maybe the last fifty pages or so, I was as confused as a panda with a mirror Am I white Am I black Am I asian Does it matter What is life I m hungry, yo Where the leaves at But everything became clear I m not going to spoil anything for you because the explanation for how the twist works is ingenious If you read this book or if you already have we ll talk in the comments Now you know why I started the review off the way I did The last ten pages are grade A thriller material A race to the finish that had me hanging off the bed in my anxiety But, overall, this entire book is a lot of fun I d definitely recommend this one to anybody who loves a well told story.In summation Harry Hole is a damn fun character to run around after I can t wait to jump intoof his adventures Oh, and in case you re wondering, I gave this four instead of five because I m leaving room for improvement Not quite fanboying, but I can see myself leaning in that direction.Final Judgment This book is the bomb Shit, I forgot about the SELF DEST Hehehe I m so fucking cheesy Later, guys and gals.

  6. James Thane James Thane says:

    Jo Nesbo may be the best Scandinavian crime fiction writer going these days He s created in Detective Harry Hole an interesting, deeply flawed protagonist who may remind American readers of Michael Connelly s Harry Bosch The Redbreast is the third novel to feature Hole, and it s a complex story that moves back and forth between the Second World War and the turn of the Twenty First Century In the earlier action, a group of Norwegian soldiers are fighting for Hitler s Germany on the Eastern Fro Jo Nesbo may be the best Scandinavian crime fiction writer going these days He s created in Detective Harry Hole an interesting, deeply flawed protagonist who may remind American readers of Michael Connelly s Harry Bosch The Redbreast is the third novel to feature Hole, and it s a complex story that moves back and forth between the Second World War and the turn of the Twenty First Century In the earlier action, a group of Norwegian soldiers are fighting for Hitler s Germany on the Eastern Front The tide of the war is turning against them casualties are increasing, and the ties among the men are tested severely One of the Norwegian soldiers winds up wounded in a hospital where he falls in love with a beautiful nurse and begins a romance that will reverberate through the next fifty years.In the present day actually, 1999 and 2000 Oslo Detective Inspector Harry Hole makes a tragic, if unavoidable mistake For this, and to save the government from being embarrassed, he is promoted into the Security Service He becomes involved in an investigation of the neo Nazis who are active in Oslo One of them, a thug named Sverre Olsen, has been recently acquitted of a brutal assault on a small technicality, but clearly other crimes are in the works.Along the way, Harry discovers that someone in Oslo has recently come into possession of a very rare and extremely expensive sniper s rifle He has no idea who the owner is, or what he intends to do with the rifle Harry only knows that this can t possibly be good.As Hole tries to track down the rifle and figure out what the neo Nazis are up to, the two story lines collide, leading to a great climax The story is very well told the characters are fully developed, and the suspense is virtually non stop Any reader of crime fiction is almost certain to enjoy it.A word of caution If you are interested in reading any of Nesbo s Harry Hole books, it is critically important that you read them in order There are developments in each of the books, particularly regarding the characters, that will spoil a good deal of the suspense if you read the books out of sequence

  7. Matt Matt says:

    With Harry Hole focussing his attention on Norwegian soil, Nesb brings the third book in the series to the writer s attention After a heroic act during a political summit, Hole is promoted to inspector and moved to the POT, a security directorate In his new role, Hole begins an investigation into rumours that a high powered rifle has been brought into the country and may be used in an assassination attempt of some sort Working in conjunction with his former partner, Ellen, they discover that With Harry Hole focussing his attention on Norwegian soil, Nesb brings the third book in the series to the writer s attention After a heroic act during a political summit, Hole is promoted to inspector and moved to the POT, a security directorate In his new role, Hole begins an investigation into rumours that a high powered rifle has been brought into the country and may be used in an assassination attempt of some sort Working in conjunction with his former partner, Ellen, they discover that all roads lead back to a man named the Prince , though Hole is unable to uncover this individual s real identity Ellen inadvertently stumbles upon a major clue, but is attacked before she can pass it along to Hole, who grasps at any clue he can to close the case At this same time, Hole becomes involved with a colleague, Rakel, and her son, Oleg This relationship blooms and fades throughout the novel, as Hole tries to synthesise all that is going on in his professional and personal lives Alongside this storyline, Nesb tells a tale of a handful of Norwegian soldiers who chose to fight with the Reich after Norway s capture by German forces in World War II These men and their lives weave a complex story that spans sixty years, one which eventually pulls Hole into the centre, as the soldiers are being murdered, one by one Who is the Prince and how does it tie into the rifle imported from South Africa Will Rakel be a new addiction that Hole cannot shake Will these traitorous soldiers ever be safe in the country on which they turned their backs Nesb has answers, but also a handfulquestions, for the reader, as the novel takes turns never seen in the series to date A must read by all series Harry Hole fans, thought its depth and complexities leave the previous two novels in the proverbial dust.There is no question why or how Nesb won significant awards for this novel Its complexities and detailed plot lines make this a stellar piece of writing, no matter the language in which it is read Nesb finally shows off how Scandinavian writing is so muchnuanced and complex, and forces the reader to dig deeper to pull out all the clues to craft a successful thriller Hole and his character receive a multi faceted exploration, alongside a rich and controversial historical review of Norway at the height of World War II Nesb adds a number of characters whose importance will become apparent in subsequent novels so I have heard and does so in a fluid manner, setting the scene for some Oslo based mysteries, rather than flitting off to the vast reaches of the globe While the historical story seemed to drag at times, its importance becomes readily apparent as the climax of the novel approaches and the patient reader will be rewarded for the delay A thoroughly stunning piece of work that has breathed new life into the series for me and those who have come to respect Harry Hole up to this point No matter what his past has shown, Hole is a man who has muchto show and with sevennovels, Nesb has the time to peel away new layers to entice his fans.Kudos Mr Nesb for this novel that does not give up from the beginning until the final sentence You are to be applauded for your hard work and significant effort.Like hate the review An ever growing collection of others appears at

  8. Marty Marty says:

    I m quitting after four chapters There have been four different scenes, a couple dozen characters and at least two dates out of time sequentially I HATE books written this way Hate them I already don t remember the characters I don t remember which character goes with which scene I don t want the first chapter preview of things yet to come Mysteries are supposed to have confusing plots, not generate confusion by having the chapters in random order I m done with books written this way a I m quitting after four chapters There have been four different scenes, a couple dozen characters and at least two dates out of time sequentially I HATE books written this way Hate them I already don t remember the characters I don t remember which character goes with which scene I don t want the first chapter preview of things yet to come Mysteries are supposed to have confusing plots, not generate confusion by having the chapters in random order I m done with books written this way and authors who write this way I do not read as an exercise to see how many scenes and minor characters my short term memory can hold I do not read to see if my brain can sort chapters presented out of sequence I want a character I can identify with I operate in a universe in which time moves monotonically forward

  9. Ginger Ginger says:

    Fantastic I must love Norwegian mysteries and flawed detectives Going with 4.0 4.5 stars on this one The Redbreast is the 3rd book in the Harry Hole series and I really enjoyed this one I think you can read this as a stand alone because I haven t read books, 1 The Bat 2 Cockroaches.I read The Redbreast for my book club selection for July I m really happy they picked this mystery because it was complex, suspenseful and I enjoyed it all the way through.Thanks Terry for joining me in a bud Fantastic I must love Norwegian mysteries and flawed detectives Going with 4.0 4.5 stars on this one The Redbreast is the 3rd book in the Harry Hole series and I really enjoyed this one I think you can read this as a stand alone because I haven t read books, 1 The Bat 2 Cockroaches.I read The Redbreast for my book club selection for July I m really happy they picked this mystery because it was complex, suspenseful and I enjoyed it all the way through.Thanks Terry for joining me in a buddy read for this It was evenfun to share the WWII madness and Neo Nazi craziness with you.The book starts off with Harry Hole embarrassing the force not really, but politics is a bitch and he s been reassigned to do simple surveillance tasks He comes across a high powered rifle being bought on the black market It s the type of rifle that can be traced back to WWII that was used by Nazi soldiers and allies to Germany.What s up with this type of rifle being brought into Oslo, Norway under questionable circumstances What s it got to do with Neo Nazi activities And this is the beginning of a slow burn with a fantastic ending There s the mystery of the soldiers fighting on the Eastern Front between Russia and German Allies Norway at the time was invaded by Germany and they were sending Norwegian men to the front lines When the war was over, these men came back as traitors to their country.I ve got to say, I really enjoyed the past to present format in this book I love how it kept progressing the mystery of the men fighting in 1944 and to present time with Harry Hole trying to figure out Neo Nazi conspiracies and motives.I really didn t see the plot twists or who was behind the killings until Joe Nesblaid it all out for me at the end Fantastic writing for me not to figure out a thing Definitely recommend this to crime detective fans and people who love Norwegian mysteries Stick with it though if you can handle the slow burn It delivers in the end

  10. Algernon (Darth Anyan) Algernon (Darth Anyan) says:

    7 10 There s nothing wrong with this Scandinavian crime thriller, possibly the most popular of its category in recent years Yet its technical achievements pacing, characterization, research, atmosphere, etc may have been what kept me being fully emotionally involved in the story With a few exceptions of great character sketches, the story felt contrived and to clever for its own good I would even go so far as call the plot forgettable if it were not for the numerous flashbacks to the World 7 10 There s nothing wrong with this Scandinavian crime thriller, possibly the most popular of its category in recent years Yet its technical achievements pacing, characterization, research, atmosphere, etc may have been what kept me being fully emotionally involved in the story With a few exceptions of great character sketches, the story felt contrived and to clever for its own good I would even go so far as call the plot forgettable if it were not for the numerous flashbacks to the World War II seeds of the current crisis.The feeling I m just along for the ride, with a big bag of popcorn beside me started with the prologue, and continued to the last page We meet Harry Hole in my case for the first time, because I skipped his first two novels in the series as a burned out policeman, a bag of nerves that manages to shoot at a friendly target during a US presidential visit to Oslo In order to avoid an international scandal, his superiors promote him to a special investigations desk, where instead of laying down quietly, he starts tracking the links between skinhead gangs violence, the purchase of a very exensive sniper rifle and resentments inherited from past collaborations of Norwegians with the Nazis in WWII.Now for the good stuff Harry is a great choice for the main character of a multi volume series He is flawed, depressive, introspective, vulnerable in his personal life, a loner among his colleagues Yet we see under all the darkness the flashes of a sunnier core, in his friendly bantering with his partner Ellen, in his tentative wooing of a woman he interviews during his investigations The sense of humour is so muchprecious and hard won, given his post traumatic stress I feel I should read at lest the two preques, to give him a better chance of winning me overBorn in 1965 You look older than that, Inspector Hole Bad genes Bad luck for you Well, they let me into eighteen certificate films when I was fourteen I laugh from tie to time, But Harry s song is sung moe often than not in a key of sadness view spoiler I was angry beyond words at the killing of Ellen, a gratuitous tug on my sympathy after putting a lot of hope in her continued presence in the series as a counterweight to Harry s morbid apathy hide spoilerEllen had said he lacked natural buoyancy, or whatever it was that meant most people could struggle to the surface again After his return from Bangkok he had been down for so long that he had considered giving up ever returning to the surface Everything had been cold and dark, and all his impressions were somehow dulled As if he were deeply immersed in water It had been so wonderfully quiet When people talked to him the words had been like bubbles of air coming out of their mouths, hurrying upwards and awaythe controversy surrounding the role of Norwegians collaborators in WWII, and how history is rewritten by the victors, creating resentments and pushing waves of hatred far into the future, is a better andoriginal anchor to the novel than the terrorist with a big gun cliche The historical flashbacks to the siege of Leningrad, to a hospital in Vienna, or to Hamburg after carpet bombing, worked much better for me thn the contemporary pieceswriting the history that the authorities felt postwar Norway deserved By keeping quiet about the widespread collaboration with the Germans and focusing on the little resistance there was For instance, Juul devotes five pages to the sinking of the Blucher on the night leading to 9 April in his history book, but he quietly ignores the fact that prosecutions against almost 100,000 Norwegians were being considered at the trials And it worked The myths of a Norwegian population fighting shoulder to shoulder against Nazism live on todayin line with other Scandinavian writers, Nesbo is aware and skillful in weaving together the individual with the larger social problems of his time Harry Hole s depression is rooted not only in his personal experiences in Australia and Bangkok, but also in the existential alienation of the modern man To the issue of Nazi collaboration we can add the Israelo Palestinian conflict, the Apartheid regime in South Africa, digs at the Russian and American superpower claims andA poster in his derelict apartment quotes BjornebeeAnd this acceleration in the production of horsepower is again just one expression of acceleration in our understanding of the so called laws of nature This understanding angstIt may be a secondary plot in the novel, but once again, for me it wasimportant that the race to stop the killer the abuse of women read rape by men in a position of authority One case in Vienna in 1942 is echoed by another one in Oslo in 1999, almost mirror like One sadist gets his just deserves, the other s fate is left out for a sequel.In conclusion maybe the novel deserves a better rating than my three and a half stars, but I was a bit disappointed in the predictable ending and a few loose ends Harry Hole is a great protagonist, and I may rate his higher after I read the two prequels I skipped Recommended for fans of Nordic crime novels

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