Paperback è Salamander ePUB Þ

Paperback è Salamander ePUB Þ


Salamander [PDF / Epub] ☀ Salamander By Thomas Wharton – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Nicholas Flood an unassuming eighteenth century London printer specializes in novelty books books that nestle into one another books comprised of one spare sentence books that emit the sounds of crash Nicholas Flood an unassuming eighteenth century London printer specializes in novelty books books that nestle into one another books comprised of one spare sentence books that emit the sounds of crashing waves When his work captures the attention of an eccentric Slovakian count Flood is summoned to a faraway castle a moving labyrinth that embodies the count's obsession with puzzles where he is commissioned to create the infinite book the ultimate never ending story Probing the nature of books the human thirst for knowledge and the pursuit of immortality Salamander careens through myth and metaphor as Flood travels the globe in search of materials for the elusive book without end.

  • Paperback
  • 400 pages
  • Salamander
  • Thomas Wharton
  • English
  • 10 April 2016
  • 9780743444156

About the Author: Thomas Wharton

About MeI live in Edmonton Alberta Canada and I write books for grown ups and kids The Shadow of Malabron the first volume in my trilogy The Perilous Realm is available now in Canada the UK and the US.



10 thoughts on “Salamander

  1. Donna Donna says:

    Yet another example of a great five star beginning followed by a frustrating one or two star end The first 200 pages or so I was absolutely enthralled with what promised to be a fascinating modern day fairytale I so loved this great castle the characters lived in that was perched precariously on the border between two countries in both yet in neither with mechanisms that caused the walls floors and entire rooms to be in almost continuous motion As one arose in the morning the bed would pass through the kitchen so you could just reach out for your cup of coffee and plate of breakfast And as you prepared for a good night's sleep heaven forbid you should drop your clothing You'd have to jump off thebed race back to pick it up and then try to catch up to your bed again What wonderful word pictures I loved trying to picture how it all workedEven though I knew logically that none of it was possible it was still fun to imagine all of this activity and the sound of the grinding gears as everything moved around To this point the story was inventive clever and great fun I enjoyed each and every page until about the mid point Sad to say it was all downhill from there Somehow at that point I lost the storyline entirely Why do authors write such great first halves and such awful second halves? Who knows?sigh I'm left yet again with a true sense of loss What was the untold story here? I'm uite sure it was far better than the one that Wharton dragged us all the way to the end of the book for Like many other books I've read this year this could have and should have been so much betterOn the upside though I marked several wonderful passages Here's a favouriteSometimes you wish to escape to another part of the bookYou stop reading and riffle the pages catching sight of the story as it races ahead not above the world but through it through forests and complications the chaos of intentions and citiesAs you near the last few pages you are hurtling through the book at increasing speed until all is a blur of restlessness and then suddenly your thumb loses its grip and you sail out of the story and back into yourself The book is once again a fragile vessel of cloth and paper You have gone everywhere and nowherea good synopsis for this book perhaps

  2. Madison Madison says:

    And unseen through the chemical action of time the words themselves are drained of their living sap In every library readers sit in placid uiet while all around them a forest decays

  3. Sissel Sissel says:

    Such a wonderful and strange little book I found it where these kinds of books are supposed to be found in a second hand book market in London It is a twisting and turning tale of books stories words paper adventure; everything book is made of When I had finished it I wanted to read it again just to see if I had missed something It is a story that reuires you accept the unexpected and use your imagination which makes it even marvelous I really enjoyed it and can't wait to read it again

  4. Jackie Jackie says:

    This book is hard for me to rate I want to give it 2 stars because that's how I feel it was ok; however I'm giving it 3 because it was oklike than okdidn't like and I've given lesser books 3 stars for various reasons so 3 it is for now at leastWhy the indecision? On one hand Salamander had a lovely multi layered story in a whimsical world On the other hand it never really sucked me in The characters had cool names but I didn't care that much for any of them The author had many many cool ideas but he didn't explore them as fully as I would have liked Some parts of the story felt rushed while others were drawn out There were some inconsistencies near the end of the book and one plot point from near the end didn't make any sense to me Salamander should have been a uick fun read but instead I found it hard to keep my attention focused on what I was reading and I didn't ever really feel I entered the world Wharton created Perhaps this is because I just read The Eyre Affair and it had many similarities in the way the world in the book looked at books Perhaps instead it is because despite it's promise the book just isn't that good It's also completely possible that the book is fantastic and I just didn't read it at the appropriate time for me Whatever the case the book is fine not amazing and if you read it you won't regret it but you also may not find yourself blown away by itHow's that for helpful?

  5. Deb Deb says:

    Once upon a time there was a count who lived in a mechanical castle run by automatons This count has a fancy book collection made of every sort of novelty book but he craves So he hires a publisher specializing in art books to create a never ending storyOne of my favorite parts of this book was the traveling bedsThis is going in my re read pile soon I'm mainly just glad I own a copy Wharton's books are ridiculously difficult to find I lucked out and dug it out of one of the University Bookstore's odds ends paperback sales a while back

  6. Emma Emma says:

    Totally unexpected Not going to be most people's cup of tea but i truly enjoyed and finished it Incidently it is my most annotated book obviously not library stock 'Nobody knows what's next Nobody has a clue We live in a murky ambiguity lit by occasional flashes of utter incomprehension' This uote sums up A great book to get lost in whilst debating the limitations of mankind

  7. Zoom Zoom says:

    I'm almost certain this is a very good book and I just under appreciated it It's entirely my fault I read it too slowly I left big gaps between reading sessions I kept forgetting what had transpired I didn't follow it closely enoughI'm so relieved that it's over though

  8. Laraine Laraine says:

    I felt a bit heartless giving this book 1 star so I wanted to supplement with a review I read Salamander many years ago I was 14 or 15 I think and I picked it out for the title and cover then was enchanted by the synopsis It started out incredibly well and I was gearing up to fall hopelessly in love with this book that had amazing potential But as I read on the story fell so short of my expectations it actually broke my heart I think that's my primary reason for giving Salamander such a low rating for breaking my heart uite unfair of me to be honest because the first half of the book alone deserves 5 stars To this day 7 or 8 years later I still taste bitter regret when I remember the great promise this book had It's like thinking you've found the love of your life then suddenly being horrifically disappointedBut still I hopeThrough all the bookshelf cleanings I've done over the years Salamander has stayed All those times I would look at it wistfully and think I want to try again like an ex lover you want to give a second chance Maybe this will be the year that I reread Salamander and with the wisdom of the last 8 years love it All of it Or maybe this will be the year that I reread Salamander and be disappointed all over again If the latter I hope that the heartbreak the second time around will allow me to finally move on mark the book as a dud and donate it to the librarySecond rating and review forthcoming

  9. Leif Leif says:

    I began to read Salamander without knowing what I was getting into I thought it might be a useful book an apt vehicle for my concluding marks in my thesisLittle did I know that the adventures barelycontained in Salamander would spill all over my argument's cleanly delineated thematic areas running at will up and down the narrow plane of my thesis Like the adventurer who dreams of infinity I too was caught up in the majesty of the tale the unpredictability of the proceedings Beautiful ideas such as the clockwork puzzle castle combine with thrilling passages worth the memory of Stevenson in this novel that chronicles what Borges also found so intriguing and repellent the creation of an infinite book

  10. Kelly Kelly says:

    This book was pretty interesting The main premise is a printer trying to print a book with no end There are a lot of interesting takes on the nature of books and what they represent to the readers that read them The language got a bit lofty and hard to follow but I think that was just to promote the reader to try to ruminate on the meanings The best part was the settings an ship with uncountable hidden rooms a mechanical castle that was always moving a tiny jail cell with nothing but an imaginary printing press This book really gives you some respect for the complexities of the printed word

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10 thoughts on “Salamander

  1. Donna Donna says:

    Yet another example of a great five star beginning followed by a frustrating one or two star end The first 200 pages or so I was absolutely enthralled with what promised to be a fascinating modern day fairytale I so loved this great castle the characters lived in that was perched precariously on the border between two countries in both yet in neither with mechanisms that caused the walls floors and entire rooms to be in almost continuous motion As one arose in the morning the bed would pass through the kitchen so you could just reach out for your cup of coffee and plate of breakfast And as you prepared for a good night's sleep heaven forbid you should drop your clothing You'd have to jump off thebed race back to pick it up and then try to catch up to your bed again What wonderful word pictures I loved trying to picture how it all workedEven though I knew logically that none of it was possible it was still fun to imagine all of this activity and the sound of the grinding gears as everything moved around To this point the story was inventive clever and great fun I enjoyed each and every page until about the mid point Sad to say it was all downhill from there Somehow at that point I lost the storyline entirely Why do authors write such great first halves and such awful second halves? Who knows?sigh I'm left yet again with a true sense of loss What was the untold story here? I'm uite sure it was far better than the one that Wharton dragged us all the way to the end of the book for Like many other books I've read this year this could have and should have been so much betterOn the upside though I marked several wonderful passages Here's a favouriteSometimes you wish to escape to another part of the bookYou stop reading and riffle the pages catching sight of the story as it races ahead not above the world but through it through forests and complications the chaos of intentions and citiesAs you near the last few pages you are hurtling through the book at increasing speed until all is a blur of restlessness and then suddenly your thumb loses its grip and you sail out of the story and back into yourself The book is once again a fragile vessel of cloth and paper You have gone everywhere and nowherea good synopsis for this book perhaps

  2. Madison Madison says:

    And unseen through the chemical action of time the words themselves are drained of their living sap In every library readers sit in placid uiet while all around them a forest decays

  3. Sissel Sissel says:

    Such a wonderful and strange little book I found it where these kinds of books are supposed to be found in a second hand book market in London It is a twisting and turning tale of books stories words paper adventure; everything book is made of When I had finished it I wanted to read it again just to see if I had missed something It is a story that reuires you accept the unexpected and use your imagination which makes it even marvelous I really enjoyed it and can't wait to read it again

  4. Jackie Jackie says:

    This book is hard for me to rate I want to give it 2 stars because that's how I feel it was ok; however I'm giving it 3 because it was oklike than okdidn't like and I've given lesser books 3 stars for various reasons so 3 it is for now at leastWhy the indecision? On one hand Salamander had a lovely multi layered story in a whimsical world On the other hand it never really sucked me in The characters had cool names but I didn't care that much for any of them The author had many many cool ideas but he didn't explore them as fully as I would have liked Some parts of the story felt rushed while others were drawn out There were some inconsistencies near the end of the book and one plot point from near the end didn't make any sense to me Salamander should have been a uick fun read but instead I found it hard to keep my attention focused on what I was reading and I didn't ever really feel I entered the world Wharton created Perhaps this is because I just read The Eyre Affair and it had many similarities in the way the world in the book looked at books Perhaps instead it is because despite it's promise the book just isn't that good It's also completely possible that the book is fantastic and I just didn't read it at the appropriate time for me Whatever the case the book is fine not amazing and if you read it you won't regret it but you also may not find yourself blown away by itHow's that for helpful?

  5. Deb Deb says:

    Once upon a time there was a count who lived in a mechanical castle run by automatons This count has a fancy book collection made of every sort of novelty book but he craves So he hires a publisher specializing in art books to create a never ending storyOne of my favorite parts of this book was the traveling bedsThis is going in my re read pile soon I'm mainly just glad I own a copy Wharton's books are ridiculously difficult to find I lucked out and dug it out of one of the University Bookstore's odds ends paperback sales a while back

  6. Emma Emma says:

    Totally unexpected Not going to be most people's cup of tea but i truly enjoyed and finished it Incidently it is my most annotated book obviously not library stock 'Nobody knows what's next Nobody has a clue We live in a murky ambiguity lit by occasional flashes of utter incomprehension' This uote sums up A great book to get lost in whilst debating the limitations of mankind

  7. Zoom Zoom says:

    I'm almost certain this is a very good book and I just under appreciated it It's entirely my fault I read it too slowly I left big gaps between reading sessions I kept forgetting what had transpired I didn't follow it closely enoughI'm so relieved that it's over though

  8. Laraine Laraine says:

    I felt a bit heartless giving this book 1 star so I wanted to supplement with a review I read Salamander many years ago I was 14 or 15 I think and I picked it out for the title and cover then was enchanted by the synopsis It started out incredibly well and I was gearing up to fall hopelessly in love with this book that had amazing potential But as I read on the story fell so short of my expectations it actually broke my heart I think that's my primary reason for giving Salamander such a low rating for breaking my heart uite unfair of me to be honest because the first half of the book alone deserves 5 stars To this day 7 or 8 years later I still taste bitter regret when I remember the great promise this book had It's like thinking you've found the love of your life then suddenly being horrifically disappointedBut still I hopeThrough all the bookshelf cleanings I've done over the years Salamander has stayed All those times I would look at it wistfully and think I want to try again like an ex lover you want to give a second chance Maybe this will be the year that I reread Salamander and with the wisdom of the last 8 years love it All of it Or maybe this will be the year that I reread Salamander and be disappointed all over again If the latter I hope that the heartbreak the second time around will allow me to finally move on mark the book as a dud and donate it to the librarySecond rating and review forthcoming

  9. Leif Leif says:

    I began to read Salamander without knowing what I was getting into I thought it might be a useful book an apt vehicle for my concluding marks in my thesisLittle did I know that the adventures barelycontained in Salamander would spill all over my argument's cleanly delineated thematic areas running at will up and down the narrow plane of my thesis Like the adventurer who dreams of infinity I too was caught up in the majesty of the tale the unpredictability of the proceedings Beautiful ideas such as the clockwork puzzle castle combine with thrilling passages worth the memory of Stevenson in this novel that chronicles what Borges also found so intriguing and repellent the creation of an infinite book

  10. Kelly Kelly says:

    This book was pretty interesting The main premise is a printer trying to print a book with no end There are a lot of interesting takes on the nature of books and what they represent to the readers that read them The language got a bit lofty and hard to follow but I think that was just to promote the reader to try to ruminate on the meanings The best part was the settings an ship with uncountable hidden rooms a mechanical castle that was always moving a tiny jail cell with nothing but an imaginary printing press This book really gives you some respect for the complexities of the printed word

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *