Paperback º Persian Girls PDF/EPUB Þ

Paperback º Persian Girls PDF/EPUB Þ

Persian Girls ✰ Persian Girls Epub ✶ Author Nahid Rachlin – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk For many years heartache prevented Nahid Rachlin from turning her sharp novelist's eye inward to tell the story of how her own life diverged from that of her closest confidante and beloved sister Pari For many years heartache prevented Nahid Rachlin from turning her sharp novelist's eye inward to tell the story of how her own life diverged from that of her closest confidante and beloved sister Pari Growing up in Iran both refused to accept traditional Muslim s and dreamed of careers in literature and on the stage Their lives changed abruptly when Pari was coerced by their father into marrying a wealthy and cruel suitor Nahid narrowly avoided a similar fate and instead negotiated with him to pursue her studies in America When Nahid received the unsettling and mysterious news that Pari had died after falling down a light of stairs she traveled back to Iran now under the Islamic regime to find out what happened to her truest friend confront her past and evaluate what the future holds for the heartbroken in a tale of crushing sorrow sisterhood and ultimately hope.


10 thoughts on “Persian Girls

  1. Petra-Eggs Sunny Side Up Petra-Eggs Sunny Side Up says:

    A really excellent book right till the end and the very last sentence which might in other books of the same nature be the very first overwhelmed me and left my eyes hot with tearsIf you don't know much about the Shah of Iran the popular movement that spawned the revolution that brought the Ayatollah to power and turned a modern state into a fundamentalist Muslim country you will after reading this book But not from a political point of view as much as one that details the differences in the way of life especially for women who in one stroke went from lipstick and high heels to hijab from career women to scarcely having any rights And from enlightened relationships to the legalised prostitution of them called 'temporary marriage' It's no history lesson it's the experiences of Nahid Rachlin and that is eually valuable rather than the names dates and political acts it will give you the understanding of events and their conseuences for ordinary peopleThe contrast between her and her brothers' lives in the US and that of those who remained in Iran is striking But the US is not necessarily a welcoming place for those who would live there even temporarily if they don't fit in to some exceedingly narrow parameters And just as much as Iran Americans can be whipped up as a herd into political actions they barely understand and then visit those actions on individuals rather than the governments responsible Personal freedom is something the US takes for granted and something every regime in Iran finds appalling so the author chose to make her life in America and was therefore free to write and publish this book Rewritten entirely 13 March 2013


  2. William Lawrence William Lawrence says:

    Persian Girls is one of the greatest memoirs I've ever read Nahid Rachlin brings us into a tense world of surprises that eventually evolves into a new hope This book is vivid dreamy and displays the way in which a person can be personally torn between two worlds the past and the future Rachlin gives a great cultural portrait of Iran in the 20th century and what it was like to grow up there and then make the jump to America This memoir was very far away from my own personal experiences which is why I enjoyed the cultural education and escape from my comfort zone of knowledge Rachlin makes the ride smooth and accessible


  3. Jeanette (Again) Jeanette (Again) says:

    35 starsNahid Rachlin writes with impressive fluidity making this memoir read like a novel Good flow It moves fast and yet is a complete story She tells of being given to her Aunt Maryam to raise because Maryam was unable to have children So Maryam was her mother But then her father abducted her when she was nine years old and he decided it was time for her to live with her birth family in another city She was miserable there but her sweet older sister Pari gave her the love she needed and made things bearable The book tells pretty much her whole life story of repression and censorship and fear in Iran She was able to convince her father to let her come to America for college so she didn't have to go into a forced marriage Almost all of her loved ones were still in Iran and suffered the horrors of Khomeini almost exactly like the Taliban and the devastation of the Iran Ira WarI couldn't uite go up to 4 stars only because she seems so emotionally detached from the events of her own life It's almost as if she watched it happen from a distance rather than experiencing it I kept wondering if perhaps the early trauma in her life taught her to protect herself by not feeling too deeply Or maybe she feels it and can't translate that feeling into her writing Well worth reading nonetheless


  4. Cheryl Cheryl says:

    This was an alluring story about a Persian girl growing up in Iran during the days of the Shah When she is born her mother gives her to her sister who can't have children She is raised by her single widowed aunt who is truly the mother she knows until the day her father decides that he will take her back because she is of the age when she needs to be raised with a man in the household Imagine being nine years old separated from your mother and placed in a household where everyone feels like a stranger even if one of them is your birth mother The story evolves when Nahid and her sister Pari become best friends one wants to become an actress the other a writer but Pari who is in love with another man is forced into marriage by her parents and Nahid manages to come to America for schooling They take different paths and their lives end up drastically different You sense the loneliness of the young narrator throughout the book everyone she loves or befriends ends up being taken away somehowI love when a memoir combines story setting and situation into nonfictional storytelling form like this one did I read this book in one and a half days and enjoyed it not only because of the great pacing and the underlying love story but because I also came away knowing about international relations Like the eight year Iran Ira war of 1980 the 1979 US Embassy hostage situation which the movie Argo partly depicted the censoring and issues Iranian women facedGirls didn't ever run laugh out loud or look at boys standing in doorways or against walls Boys were waiting for them to pass by to put letters in their hands inviting them to secret meetings The engaged girls moved in a slow way spoke softly; any raised voice any swift or jerky movement was considered unfeminine and not in good taste I did wonder though why some of the historical elements were placed into sectional blobs instead of disseminated throughout the narrative And my biggest pet peeve which has nothing to do with the uality of the book was the awkward Kindle formatting


  5. PS PS says:

    I know very little about modern Iranian history all I had studied before was the Persians and the Greeks – that period of Persian history so it was a delight to come across this hauntingly beautiful memoir by Nahid RachlinThrough Rachlin’s words I went on a journey through Iran through Imperial Iran to the Iranian revolution to the modern day period Rachlin’s family is a messy complicated structure caught between the old and the new – modern and traditional Islamic values and ideas They struggle on an individual and societal level – there are shattered dreams losses distances both emotional and physical The memoir reads like a novel; Rachlin is mostly a detached observer She maintains a certain distance from her past – perhaps a coping mechanism to deal with her various traumas The distance fades away however when she talks about her elder sister Pari There is so much love and understanding between the two I was moved to tears with the unfolding of Pari’s life how the patriarchy suashed a vibrant woman full of ambition The last line of the memoir will forever haunt me I look forward to reading Rachlin’s Foreigner next


  6. Harvee Harvee says:

    I read this excellent memoir in two sittings The writing is fluid and compelling and easily takes you into the author's life in Iran and into the lives of the writer's two families her adoptive mother Maryam and her biological mother Mohtaram two sisters This moving story reveals the plight of women without a voice of their own in family or in public life and the difficulty of living in Iran during the time for both men and women The memoir tells the poignant story of two Iranian sisters Maryam and Mohtaram their daughter the author Nahid Rachlin and of Nahid's sisters Pari and Manijeh all Persian Girls in Iran during the time of the Shah It is also a moving story of the sisters' love and loyalty in the face of family betrayal and loss and the precarious lives of women living under strict tradition in a male dominated societyThe memoir is also about Nahid's personal struggle with her life with her biological parents after she was removed from her adoptive mother's home in Tehran at age nine and returned to her family home Nahid had been raised by her childless aunt Maryam since she was six months old and the shock of suddenly been taken away from Maryam by her father seemed to her like a cruel abduction How she fights to resolve this and to lead her own independent life is the subject of this book I recommend this excellent memoir for those interested in women women's rights Iranian history and the growth and development of a writer Nahid Rachlin is author of the novels Jumping over Fire Foreigner Married to a Stranger The Heart's Desire and a collection of short stories She is an associate fellow at Yale and also teaches at the New School and the Unterberg Poetry Center in New YorkThanks to the the publisher for a review copy of this book


  7. Michelle Michelle says:

    Particularly in the current political climate I was hoping that this book would provide a fascinating look into a culture that is at best underrepresented in mainstream English language books and at worst criticized discriminated against and even hated; the fact that the author is a woman made it all the enticing as I simply can't read enough of how my fellow women live survive and thrive in other culturesPERSIAN GIRLS delivers on all accounts and has made me want to learn not only about this intriguing woman cappuccino is on me if you're ever in southern Italy Ms Rachlin but also about Iranian history and culture in generalFrom Rachlin's difficult childhood with a mother who didn't seem to want her and a father who wanted only control to her struggle for independence and acceptance in America PERSIAN GIRLS places the reader in the very heart and mind of the author as she rises to each successive challenge placed before herFrom the time Rachlin was taken from the only mother she knew I found myself cheering her on a credit to an outstanding opening scene that transports the reader to 1950s Iran amidst a prayer rug a Koran rose water a paraffin lamp and hot summer nights spent talking about a golden ladder descending from the skyAnd yet Rachlin's writing style isn't nostalgic or wistful She presents her life with such an objective tone sometimes that I forgot she was telling her own life story and this is not a criticism To the contrary I felt like what I was reading was a true fair account of events and knowing that I'm able to trust the author is so very importantAt times however I did feel that there was just a bit held back regarding the working through of her feelings in some of her relationships particularly the most difficult ones; the fact that some family members are still alive surely had something to do with this but overall I don't find that this guardedness distracts from the memoir Rachlin gives plenty of clues into her personality to provide the reader with a sense of what the author might've been feeling and I don't think there's anything wrong with a little mystery in any book even a memoirOn another level Rachlin's expat status in America really spoke to me and I'm sure to plenty of other expats as well the feeling of being caught between two cultures two languages two ways of life On whether she regretted her choice to go to America in a subseuent interview Rachlin saidI have never really regretted my choice to come to America pursue my own goals But I am always aware of a loss a price to pay for the independence I have gained I don't have easy access and closeness to people I love because of all the distance between usIndeed I wouldn't mind another memoir or even a how to from Rachlin on her marriage to an American and raising her daughter in a country that is a sometimes enemy of her own I look forward to reading Rachlin's fiction as wellI wholeheartedly recommend this memoir to anyone with an interest in women's history cultural differences the Middle East family relationships love or you know life


  8. Emily Emily says:

    These days I find myself really attracted to memoirs it doesn't even have to be a famous person but I just love reading about people's lives whether they are seemingly normal or famous I found this book to be incredibly readable I actually couldn't put it down and read it in a day While the author's writing wasn't necessarily very warm or welcoming her story is a good one and made me so angry at times that I wanted to toss this book across the room and jump up and down on it I've always been so confused about countries who have nearly zero rights for women and make them wear head to toe shrouds for fear their HAIR will incite sexual feelings in the poor men of the country Seriously WHAT THE EVER LOVING FC It's important to respect different values associated with different religions and ethnic groups but come on Anyways western values feminist rant over The other part of this memoir that really sucked me in was the relationship the narrator had with her sister For some reason I really connected to that part shout out to my two sisters love you to the moon and felt it was a beautiful and left me with such sadness yet happiness that this poor women had such a beautiful relationship with her one sister when the rest of her family ties were somewhat strained whether from distance or just being being assholes


  9. Louise Louise says:

    I was glued to this slice of life in Iran and read it in one day The simplicity of the prose belies the complexity of the story The story shows how the male dominated culture strangles not only the women but itselfThe culture all but assures that there will be no happy marriages and as a result no happy people The political changes re enforce the culture and as the book progresses already stiffing lives become soThe book shows how the political changes effect everyday life Books are hard to find and people disappear Nahid's father worries that the books she reads will land him in jailI've read several narratives on Iran and its former citizens now in the US this one is the best


  10. Fatima Ezzahra Bouriss Fatima Ezzahra Bouriss says:

    So so Powerful like it so much i believe that I've been blessed enough to visit Iran a Big respect Nahid Rachlan I am free because I know that I'm alone morally responsible for everything I do I am free no matter what rules surround me If I find them tolerable I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious I break them I am free because I know that I am alone morally responsible for everything I do Robert A Heinlein


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10 thoughts on “Persian Girls

  1. Petra-Eggs Sunny Side Up Petra-Eggs Sunny Side Up says:

    A really excellent book right till the end and the very last sentence which might in other books of the same nature be the very first overwhelmed me and left my eyes hot with tearsIf you don't know much about the Shah of Iran the popular movement that spawned the revolution that brought the Ayatollah to power and turned a modern state into a fundamentalist Muslim country you will after reading this book But not from a political point of view as much as one that details the differences in the way of life especially for women who in one stroke went from lipstick and high heels to hijab from career women to scarcely having any rights And from enlightened relationships to the legalised prostitution of them called 'temporary marriage' It's no history lesson it's the experiences of Nahid Rachlin and that is eually valuable rather than the names dates and political acts it will give you the understanding of events and their conseuences for ordinary peopleThe contrast between her and her brothers' lives in the US and that of those who remained in Iran is striking But the US is not necessarily a welcoming place for those who would live there even temporarily if they don't fit in to some exceedingly narrow parameters And just as much as Iran Americans can be whipped up as a herd into political actions they barely understand and then visit those actions on individuals rather than the governments responsible Personal freedom is something the US takes for granted and something every regime in Iran finds appalling so the author chose to make her life in America and was therefore free to write and publish this book Rewritten entirely 13 March 2013

  2. William Lawrence William Lawrence says:

    Persian Girls is one of the greatest memoirs I've ever read Nahid Rachlin brings us into a tense world of surprises that eventually evolves into a new hope This book is vivid dreamy and displays the way in which a person can be personally torn between two worlds the past and the future Rachlin gives a great cultural portrait of Iran in the 20th century and what it was like to grow up there and then make the jump to America This memoir was very far away from my own personal experiences which is why I enjoyed the cultural education and escape from my comfort zone of knowledge Rachlin makes the ride smooth and accessible

  3. Jeanette (Again) Jeanette (Again) says:

    35 starsNahid Rachlin writes with impressive fluidity making this memoir read like a novel Good flow It moves fast and yet is a complete story She tells of being given to her Aunt Maryam to raise because Maryam was unable to have children So Maryam was her mother But then her father abducted her when she was nine years old and he decided it was time for her to live with her birth family in another city She was miserable there but her sweet older sister Pari gave her the love she needed and made things bearable The book tells pretty much her whole life story of repression and censorship and fear in Iran She was able to convince her father to let her come to America for college so she didn't have to go into a forced marriage Almost all of her loved ones were still in Iran and suffered the horrors of Khomeini almost exactly like the Taliban and the devastation of the Iran Ira WarI couldn't uite go up to 4 stars only because she seems so emotionally detached from the events of her own life It's almost as if she watched it happen from a distance rather than experiencing it I kept wondering if perhaps the early trauma in her life taught her to protect herself by not feeling too deeply Or maybe she feels it and can't translate that feeling into her writing Well worth reading nonetheless

  4. Cheryl Cheryl says:

    This was an alluring story about a Persian girl growing up in Iran during the days of the Shah When she is born her mother gives her to her sister who can't have children She is raised by her single widowed aunt who is truly the mother she knows until the day her father decides that he will take her back because she is of the age when she needs to be raised with a man in the household Imagine being nine years old separated from your mother and placed in a household where everyone feels like a stranger even if one of them is your birth mother The story evolves when Nahid and her sister Pari become best friends one wants to become an actress the other a writer but Pari who is in love with another man is forced into marriage by her parents and Nahid manages to come to America for schooling They take different paths and their lives end up drastically different You sense the loneliness of the young narrator throughout the book everyone she loves or befriends ends up being taken away somehowI love when a memoir combines story setting and situation into nonfictional storytelling form like this one did I read this book in one and a half days and enjoyed it not only because of the great pacing and the underlying love story but because I also came away knowing about international relations Like the eight year Iran Ira war of 1980 the 1979 US Embassy hostage situation which the movie Argo partly depicted the censoring and issues Iranian women facedGirls didn't ever run laugh out loud or look at boys standing in doorways or against walls Boys were waiting for them to pass by to put letters in their hands inviting them to secret meetings The engaged girls moved in a slow way spoke softly; any raised voice any swift or jerky movement was considered unfeminine and not in good taste I did wonder though why some of the historical elements were placed into sectional blobs instead of disseminated throughout the narrative And my biggest pet peeve which has nothing to do with the uality of the book was the awkward Kindle formatting

  5. PS PS says:

    I know very little about modern Iranian history all I had studied before was the Persians and the Greeks – that period of Persian history so it was a delight to come across this hauntingly beautiful memoir by Nahid RachlinThrough Rachlin’s words I went on a journey through Iran through Imperial Iran to the Iranian revolution to the modern day period Rachlin’s family is a messy complicated structure caught between the old and the new – modern and traditional Islamic values and ideas They struggle on an individual and societal level – there are shattered dreams losses distances both emotional and physical The memoir reads like a novel; Rachlin is mostly a detached observer She maintains a certain distance from her past – perhaps a coping mechanism to deal with her various traumas The distance fades away however when she talks about her elder sister Pari There is so much love and understanding between the two I was moved to tears with the unfolding of Pari’s life how the patriarchy suashed a vibrant woman full of ambition The last line of the memoir will forever haunt me I look forward to reading Rachlin’s Foreigner next

  6. Harvee Harvee says:

    I read this excellent memoir in two sittings The writing is fluid and compelling and easily takes you into the author's life in Iran and into the lives of the writer's two families her adoptive mother Maryam and her biological mother Mohtaram two sisters This moving story reveals the plight of women without a voice of their own in family or in public life and the difficulty of living in Iran during the time for both men and women The memoir tells the poignant story of two Iranian sisters Maryam and Mohtaram their daughter the author Nahid Rachlin and of Nahid's sisters Pari and Manijeh all Persian Girls in Iran during the time of the Shah It is also a moving story of the sisters' love and loyalty in the face of family betrayal and loss and the precarious lives of women living under strict tradition in a male dominated societyThe memoir is also about Nahid's personal struggle with her life with her biological parents after she was removed from her adoptive mother's home in Tehran at age nine and returned to her family home Nahid had been raised by her childless aunt Maryam since she was six months old and the shock of suddenly been taken away from Maryam by her father seemed to her like a cruel abduction How she fights to resolve this and to lead her own independent life is the subject of this book I recommend this excellent memoir for those interested in women women's rights Iranian history and the growth and development of a writer Nahid Rachlin is author of the novels Jumping over Fire Foreigner Married to a Stranger The Heart's Desire and a collection of short stories She is an associate fellow at Yale and also teaches at the New School and the Unterberg Poetry Center in New YorkThanks to the the publisher for a review copy of this book

  7. Michelle Michelle says:

    Particularly in the current political climate I was hoping that this book would provide a fascinating look into a culture that is at best underrepresented in mainstream English language books and at worst criticized discriminated against and even hated; the fact that the author is a woman made it all the enticing as I simply can't read enough of how my fellow women live survive and thrive in other culturesPERSIAN GIRLS delivers on all accounts and has made me want to learn not only about this intriguing woman cappuccino is on me if you're ever in southern Italy Ms Rachlin but also about Iranian history and culture in generalFrom Rachlin's difficult childhood with a mother who didn't seem to want her and a father who wanted only control to her struggle for independence and acceptance in America PERSIAN GIRLS places the reader in the very heart and mind of the author as she rises to each successive challenge placed before herFrom the time Rachlin was taken from the only mother she knew I found myself cheering her on a credit to an outstanding opening scene that transports the reader to 1950s Iran amidst a prayer rug a Koran rose water a paraffin lamp and hot summer nights spent talking about a golden ladder descending from the skyAnd yet Rachlin's writing style isn't nostalgic or wistful She presents her life with such an objective tone sometimes that I forgot she was telling her own life story and this is not a criticism To the contrary I felt like what I was reading was a true fair account of events and knowing that I'm able to trust the author is so very importantAt times however I did feel that there was just a bit held back regarding the working through of her feelings in some of her relationships particularly the most difficult ones; the fact that some family members are still alive surely had something to do with this but overall I don't find that this guardedness distracts from the memoir Rachlin gives plenty of clues into her personality to provide the reader with a sense of what the author might've been feeling and I don't think there's anything wrong with a little mystery in any book even a memoirOn another level Rachlin's expat status in America really spoke to me and I'm sure to plenty of other expats as well the feeling of being caught between two cultures two languages two ways of life On whether she regretted her choice to go to America in a subseuent interview Rachlin saidI have never really regretted my choice to come to America pursue my own goals But I am always aware of a loss a price to pay for the independence I have gained I don't have easy access and closeness to people I love because of all the distance between usIndeed I wouldn't mind another memoir or even a how to from Rachlin on her marriage to an American and raising her daughter in a country that is a sometimes enemy of her own I look forward to reading Rachlin's fiction as wellI wholeheartedly recommend this memoir to anyone with an interest in women's history cultural differences the Middle East family relationships love or you know life

  8. Emily Emily says:

    These days I find myself really attracted to memoirs it doesn't even have to be a famous person but I just love reading about people's lives whether they are seemingly normal or famous I found this book to be incredibly readable I actually couldn't put it down and read it in a day While the author's writing wasn't necessarily very warm or welcoming her story is a good one and made me so angry at times that I wanted to toss this book across the room and jump up and down on it I've always been so confused about countries who have nearly zero rights for women and make them wear head to toe shrouds for fear their HAIR will incite sexual feelings in the poor men of the country Seriously WHAT THE EVER LOVING FC It's important to respect different values associated with different religions and ethnic groups but come on Anyways western values feminist rant over The other part of this memoir that really sucked me in was the relationship the narrator had with her sister For some reason I really connected to that part shout out to my two sisters love you to the moon and felt it was a beautiful and left me with such sadness yet happiness that this poor women had such a beautiful relationship with her one sister when the rest of her family ties were somewhat strained whether from distance or just being being assholes

  9. Louise Louise says:

    I was glued to this slice of life in Iran and read it in one day The simplicity of the prose belies the complexity of the story The story shows how the male dominated culture strangles not only the women but itselfThe culture all but assures that there will be no happy marriages and as a result no happy people The political changes re enforce the culture and as the book progresses already stiffing lives become soThe book shows how the political changes effect everyday life Books are hard to find and people disappear Nahid's father worries that the books she reads will land him in jailI've read several narratives on Iran and its former citizens now in the US this one is the best

  10. Fatima Ezzahra Bouriss Fatima Ezzahra Bouriss says:

    So so Powerful like it so much i believe that I've been blessed enough to visit Iran a Big respect Nahid Rachlan I am free because I know that I'm alone morally responsible for everything I do I am free no matter what rules surround me If I find them tolerable I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious I break them I am free because I know that I am alone morally responsible for everything I do Robert A Heinlein

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