Heretic PDF/EPUB Þ Hardcover

Heretic PDF/EPUB Þ Hardcover


  • Hardcover
  • 368 pages
  • Heretic
  • Bernard Cornwell
  • English
  • 07 February 2015
  • 9780060530495

10 thoughts on “Heretic

  1. Kaora Kaora says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed the first two books of the series so this one was a bit of a let down for meBernard Cornwell is great at battle scenes and creating memorable characters However I found this book not up to the same standards as the other two books There was a lot less action and while I really felt for the main character Thomas in the last book because his decisions resulted view spoilerin the death of his wife to be and child hide spoiler


  2. Anna Maria Anna Maria says:

    I really enjoyed this series even if I totally prefered the first two books better than this last one The constant action kept me reading the story I absolutely find that Thomas is extraordinary he was even abbandoned by his best friend and excommunicated by saving Genevieve that the church considered heretic Seeing how powerful church men were greedy and did atrocious cruelties in the name of God leaves you thinking Fortunately today it is no longer like this I dare not imagine how many innocents have been condemned by the inuisition and reading how they were tortured causes me a lot of sadness


  3. Jason Koivu Jason Koivu says:

    Heretic has what Cornwell's fans crave electrolytes action Plenty of action There are battles both personal and thus fictional as well as historical footnotes to the Hundred Years War Gritty and fairly fast paced this is a perfectly fine book uite enjoyable actually if you're new to Bernard Cornwell However it somewhat pales in comparison to some of his other stuff The uest for the Holy Grail with war as the backdrop makes for a good story The plotting and pace are solid I think where Heretic drops the ball is in the character department This is the third book of a series and I only feel slightly attached to Thomas of Hookton our hero and MC And it's not just his fault but Cornwell also did the dirty to a side character Robbie Douglas the Scot who is a very likable sidekick He gets used poorly in this book I think because Cornwell needed a foil to trip up Thomas It's unfortunate and I don't think it made a lot of sense Perhaps I missed something but his character 180 just seemed to come out of left field There is one book in this series which I will read I've come too far not to I just wish I was enthused about it Oh well Even when Cornwell writes a dud I still find something to enjoy about it It's a testament to his prowess as a writer of action packed historical fiction that I'm still willing to forge through a bookseries I might otherwise set aside


  4. Steven Walle Steven Walle says:

    This was a great end to this trilogy This ceries is not for the faint of heart There is much killing and cruel tortured described within its' pages Enjoy andBe Blessed


  5. Jamie Jamie says:

    This series by Bernard Cornwell consists of three books The Archer's Tale Vagabond and Heretic I'm just gonna lump them all together here since there's really not a whole lot to set them apart By that I mean that they've definitely got the trademarks of an overly prolific author who just churns stuff out within his comfort zone eg I got tired of hearing about how an arrow head pierced mail and leather after the fifth time in one book so that you get largely the same story being told 3 times with slight variations and a big payoff at the end So it makes sense to consider them all at once because otherwise I'd just end up repeating myself A lot like the authorBut actually I kind of enjoyed these books despite how they felt stretched out and meandering They tell the story of Thomas of Hookton an English archer during the middle ages who is searching for the Holy Grail The Grail with a capital G is as you may know supposedly the cup from which Christ drank at the last supper and which caught the blood from His side as He hung on the cross The Grail uest books are as you might further surmise from this short description works of historical fiction set towards the end of the middle ages In a way the books read a lot like fantasy except that all the fantasy staples that makes me groan and roll my eyes every other page are have blessedly gone missing You've still got big beefy guys in armor who scream battle cries as they storm castles trample the country side and generally hack the living daylights out of each other but you don't have tired stuff like wizards elves prophecies magic political intrigue and whatever other junk most fantasy authors like to fish out of the recycling bin It was oddly refreshing even if it's only because I've not read much historical fiction beforeIt's also a lot of what I would call military pr0n of the medieval variety One of Cromwell's hallmarks seems to be that he takes an imaginary character such as the aforementioned Thomas of Hookton and slips him in to real historical events like this battle or that siege or that some other big event that generally takes a name according to the The Verb of Location standard Cromwell then goes to great delightful lengths to describe the tactics and strategies that each side used steeping the whole thing in human drama from a soldier's point of view At times it read a bit like the instruction manual to a real time strategy game like Age of Empires with detailed explanations about how the English placed their pike men along a low ridge that gave them an attack bonus against mounted infantry that stacked with their terrain bonuses AND faction attributes Well maybe it wasn't that blatant but I still dig that kind of thing And casting the main character in the role of an English Archer with his big ole longbow though oddly it was never called by that name gave him a good excuse to teach us all about archery and the overwhelmingly effective use of such archers in warfare Fun stuffBut even if there was a history cum videogame abstraction to the battles at times I was nonetheless struck by how incredibly savage and harsh warfare apparently was in those days Cornwell didn't shy away from vivid descriptions of bloody hand to hand fighting and brutal tactics that don't much resemble the romanticized image of a chivalrous knight of the Round Table I was also forced to admit that Cornwell writes some of the best insults I've ever seen When one side accuses the other of being turds birthed from Satan's own arse that's the kind of curse that you just gotta sit up and admireWhat about the story? Well it's nothing too fantastic mainly following Thomas around as he follows the trail of the Holy Grail while being pursued by his villainous cousin Well when he's not busy being an archer bedding wenches he goes through three love interests in a very James Bond esue fashion in the course of the trilogy laying siege to castles and getting tortured by the Spanish Inuisition which by the way everybody expected as soon as the first Dominican priest was introduced contrary to what any flying circus tells you But while his path is circuitous this is the uest that ties all the books together and it's resolved nicely at the end so that I was left with a satisfied feeling that I had seen something that was entertaining and a bit educational but not necessarily full of itself


  6. Lisa Rathbun Lisa Rathbun says:

    I really enjoyed this series although the brutal violence and the constant blasphemies were rather hair raising The constant turns of Fortune's wheel kept me riveted to the story Thomas is triumphant Thomas is excommunicated Thomas is a fugitive etcHow absolutely frightening was the power of the church How horrible to see Christianity misused by evil men for selfish greed I am so thankful for God's Word available to read so we need not kowtow in fear and ignorance to the demands of an organized church It really really bugged me that the vicious godless killlers of Thomas's company condemned and rejected Genevieve so readily just because the church named her a heretic Characters could see the evil self serving cruel behavior of churchmen and still thought that the priests could speak for God As Thomas said We only know God through His Church Thank the Lord I have the Scriptures to help me know God BTW I really liked Abbot PlanchardNote to myself This isn't a particularly literary reference but Guy Vexille reminded me of a character in the movie Serenity or the TV show Firefly who did evil things in order to bring in a perfect world Guy said The world is beset by evil and the Church is corrupt and the devil does his work unhindered If we have the Grail we can change that The Church can be cleansed a new crusade can scour the world of sin It will bring the kingdom of Heaven to earth We shall take the world Thomas and open it to the love of God All the grace and beauty of God poured onto the world No sadness no sin just the harmony of God in a world of peace So incredibly creepy to see men of evil who think they are good


  7. Ed Ed says:

    This is the best of the three book Grail Series Cornwell manages to tie up all the loose ends while providing the reader with a satisfactory conclusion that does not strain one's credulityThe story opens with the siege of Calais and ends with the first of the plagues that ravaged Europe for hundreds of years In between Thomas of Hookton continues his uest for the Holy Grail which his family is supposed to have or have had in its possessionIn the process he is given an order to try and find the Grail by his liege Lord The Duke of Northumberland He begins by capturing a castle in France as a base of operations saves an accused heretic Genevieve from being burned at the stake falls in love with her is deemed a heretic himself hides out in a monastery near his ancestral home escapes those who would torture him to find out what he knows returns to his soldiers fights a last battle in the midst of the plague and ends up in England with GenvieveAs is always the case with Cornwell's writing the battle scenes are second to none The characters are slightly stereotyped but not so badly that it detracts from the exciting plotA very good read


  8. LOUISE FIELDER LOUISE FIELDER says:

    Heretic is the last chapter of The Grail uest seriesEven though the author admits there are only 2 historical facts in the whole book at the beginning and the end this is none the less an awe inspiring masterpieceWith vivid battle scenes intriuing characters and heart renching episodes even though the era itself was a time when close relationships were considered a rareity The story was fascinating and spell binding gripping the reader throughoutSorry to see the story of Thomas Genevieve Robbie and their friends come to an endThroughly enjoyable hard to put down


  9. Phil Syphe Phil Syphe says:

    “Heretic” struck me as very different to the first two books in the Grail series A couple of episodes did draw me in but on the whole I found it lacking I do like the main character – Thomas – but missed his Jewish friend who has a passion for checking the colour of people’s urine plus Thomas's one time lover Jeanette neither of which appear at all in this volume I would’ve rated this novel three stars but like all the Bernard Cornwell books that I’ve read to date I’ve deducted a star because they are all let down by substandard elements of style Long winded sentences are plentiful The needless dialogue attribution drives me to distraction whilst the overuse of the word “then” is surprising for such a seasoned authorThis of all the books I’ve ever read may well hold the record of overusing the word “then” Sometimes it’s in consecutive sentences Occasionally it’s used twice in the same sentence The best authors avoid using “then” wherever possible It is achievable to write a long novel without using this word at all except maybe in dialogue but in the main narrative it sounds like a child’s voice Think of a seven year old telling you about their holiday “And then I did this and then I did that and then ’Take this for exampleThen the routiers would take a new oath go to war and fight until a truce was called and then knowing no trade except killing they would go back to the lonelier stretches of countryside and find a town to savageTo start a sentence with “then” or “and then” is particularly bad form First it’s obvious that the above info happens next Second if one was to remove the childish opening and adjust the syntax to eliminate some of the commas and superfluous conjunctions a stronger sentence will be revealedThe routiers would take a new oath They’d go to war until a truce was called Knowing no trade except killing they’d return to the lonelier stretches of countryside and find a town to savageNotice how we have the same info but in fewer wordsI sometimes wonder if Mr Cornwell gets paid per word If his works were thoroughly copy edited they'd be all about 50 pages shorter The story would remain the same but the reading experience would be much smootherThis is a typical long winded sentence kept going by numerous conjunctions punctuation plus this one has a “then” for good measureThe valley where that poor village lay had already been plundered and so he meant to stop in the next valley where a slew of plump settlements were strung along the road south from Masseube and then when his men were busy about their devil’s business he and a few men would ride with Robbie to the hills overlooking Astarac and if there were no coredors or other enemies in sight let the Scotsman ride on aloneThe above mammoth sentence could easily be cut down to three or four concise sentences It would have impact if some of those commas and conjunctions were replaced with full stops To this reader at least the above is like listening to a hyperactive child There are many of this type of sentence all the way through the novelWhat really makes me groan most of all when reading Mr Cornwell’s books is the dialogue attribution The two main annoyances are the repetition of informing the reader who’s talking when it’s obvious which character it is plus the invariable inclusion of attribution after the first few words This is like trying to listen to someone talk whilst another person keeps interrupting This uote shows the last point made above‘I was reminded the other day’ he said ‘of one of the psalms of David'No need at all to insert “he said” It only disrupts the sentence flow The uote below is extremely stupid‘I am Galat Lorret’ Lorret saidIt’s as though the author thinks his readers are stupid This isn’t a Spartacus scenario Nobody in the scene needed to step forward and claim to be Galat Lorret Why insult our intelligence by adding the pointless attribution?Another recurring irritation in this author’s works are his telling the reader that a character is dressed all in black only to follow this up by describing each garment preceded by the adjective blackHe was dressed all in black Black boots black breeches black jerkin black cloak black broad brimmed hat and a sword scabbard sheathed in black clothI’ve lost count of how many times Mr Cornwell has done this in his novels In fact I was part listening to this from an audio recording and guessed the moment the narrator said “He was dressed all in black” that he’d go on to describe each article as being black I shook my head at this childish way of writing You may expect to read this sort of thing in a book for under ten year olds but not in one written by a seasoned authorApart from the overuse of adjectives – something else this author is guilty of along with using too many adverbs – it’s also a waste of words in general Had Mr Cornwell attended creative writing classes at university level and studied the art of English style he’d know that every word in fiction should matter His historical accuracy is always commendable If only he’d spend half as much effort on his use of style Clearly this doesn’t bother the majority of readers who give him five star ratings but to me story and style should complement each other If the style’s not up to standard I’m left distracted by it unable to be drawn into the story I sometimes wonder why I keep reader this author’s works Truth is despite the poor English style his historical knowledge and ability to tell a story are superb If he’s writing about a period or situation that interests me I’ll check it out If he picks something I’m only half interested in however I won’t go near it because of the distracting elements of style I would’ve given up on this one after the thirtieth use of “then” had I only been reading this in PDF format instead of additionally listening to it in audio format


  10. Gabriel Woods Gabriel Woods says:

    This book brought me back in time to an era when The Grail and similar such powerful relics were believed to be real This was a magical time as well was a very violent era when mythology and all things mystical were blended with reality Throughout the book even the most threatening knight or men at arms as Cornwell names the characters who were soldiers despite their strength and prowess in battle to be somewhat naive The soldiers and many people in Europe as described by Cornwell in Heretic often had a belief in the supremacy the Church in every aspect of life The Inuisition could often be the fate of those who did not obey monks and priests The seeking of mystical relics religion the manipulations of lords and kings by monks and priest were often used as a call to war Some soldiers fought for the love of their women Fierce battles were wonderfully written and described in detail and clarityA wonderfully written story Today I am taking another book written by Cornwell The Lords Of The North out from the library my workplace as an author where I do most of my writing and I am really looking forward to reading the novel


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Heretic[BOOKS] ✫ Heretic ✭ Bernard Cornwell – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk The Barnes Noble Review Heretic is the impressive third novel in the Grail uest series by Bernard Cornwell a masterful voice in the historical suspense subgenre Although the first two Grail novels The The Barnes Noble Review Heretic is the impressive third novel in the Grail uest series by Bernard Cornwell a masterful voice in the historical suspense subgenre Although the first two Grail novels The Archer's Tale and Vagabond have their fair share of mystery political intrigue and gripping battlefield action this sweeping epic practically explodes with nefarious schemes grandiose conflicts and surprising plot twists In the year English archer Thomas of Hookton continues his search for the Holy Grail With the Hundred Years' War raging all around Thomas is fighting in France when he's ordered to his ancestral home of Astarac in Gascony the scene of the last Grail sighting While he and a small group of loyal English archers hold a captured castle against French forces Thomas confronts his father's murderer the wrath of a corrupt church and the secrets surrounding his own lineage A well researched and complex novel Heretic includes beautiful imagery and intriguing plot strands woven against a detailed backdrop of war Cornwell combines fact and myth fusing them into vivid scenes of heroism in the face of horrific carnage Yet in spite of so many disparate story lines the action remains taut and compelling Heretic is destined to become a true classic among historical action novels Tom Piccirilli.


About the Author: Bernard Cornwell

Cornwell was born in London in His father was a Canadian airman and his mother who was English a member of the Women's Auxiliary Air Force He was adopted and brought up in Essex by the Wiggins family who were members of the Peculiar People a strict Protestant sect who banned frivolity of all kinds and even medicine After he left them he changed his name to his birth mother's maiden n.


10 thoughts on “Heretic

  1. Kaora Kaora says:

    I thoroughly enjoyed the first two books of the series so this one was a bit of a let down for meBernard Cornwell is great at battle scenes and creating memorable characters However I found this book not up to the same standards as the other two books There was a lot less action and while I really felt for the main character Thomas in the last book because his decisions resulted view spoilerin the death of his wife to be and child hide spoiler

  2. Anna Maria Anna Maria says:

    I really enjoyed this series even if I totally prefered the first two books better than this last one The constant action kept me reading the story I absolutely find that Thomas is extraordinary he was even abbandoned by his best friend and excommunicated by saving Genevieve that the church considered heretic Seeing how powerful church men were greedy and did atrocious cruelties in the name of God leaves you thinking Fortunately today it is no longer like this I dare not imagine how many innocents have been condemned by the inuisition and reading how they were tortured causes me a lot of sadness

  3. Jason Koivu Jason Koivu says:

    Heretic has what Cornwell's fans crave electrolytes action Plenty of action There are battles both personal and thus fictional as well as historical footnotes to the Hundred Years War Gritty and fairly fast paced this is a perfectly fine book uite enjoyable actually if you're new to Bernard Cornwell However it somewhat pales in comparison to some of his other stuff The uest for the Holy Grail with war as the backdrop makes for a good story The plotting and pace are solid I think where Heretic drops the ball is in the character department This is the third book of a series and I only feel slightly attached to Thomas of Hookton our hero and MC And it's not just his fault but Cornwell also did the dirty to a side character Robbie Douglas the Scot who is a very likable sidekick He gets used poorly in this book I think because Cornwell needed a foil to trip up Thomas It's unfortunate and I don't think it made a lot of sense Perhaps I missed something but his character 180 just seemed to come out of left field There is one book in this series which I will read I've come too far not to I just wish I was enthused about it Oh well Even when Cornwell writes a dud I still find something to enjoy about it It's a testament to his prowess as a writer of action packed historical fiction that I'm still willing to forge through a bookseries I might otherwise set aside

  4. Steven Walle Steven Walle says:

    This was a great end to this trilogy This ceries is not for the faint of heart There is much killing and cruel tortured described within its' pages Enjoy andBe Blessed

  5. Jamie Jamie says:

    This series by Bernard Cornwell consists of three books The Archer's Tale Vagabond and Heretic I'm just gonna lump them all together here since there's really not a whole lot to set them apart By that I mean that they've definitely got the trademarks of an overly prolific author who just churns stuff out within his comfort zone eg I got tired of hearing about how an arrow head pierced mail and leather after the fifth time in one book so that you get largely the same story being told 3 times with slight variations and a big payoff at the end So it makes sense to consider them all at once because otherwise I'd just end up repeating myself A lot like the authorBut actually I kind of enjoyed these books despite how they felt stretched out and meandering They tell the story of Thomas of Hookton an English archer during the middle ages who is searching for the Holy Grail The Grail with a capital G is as you may know supposedly the cup from which Christ drank at the last supper and which caught the blood from His side as He hung on the cross The Grail uest books are as you might further surmise from this short description works of historical fiction set towards the end of the middle ages In a way the books read a lot like fantasy except that all the fantasy staples that makes me groan and roll my eyes every other page are have blessedly gone missing You've still got big beefy guys in armor who scream battle cries as they storm castles trample the country side and generally hack the living daylights out of each other but you don't have tired stuff like wizards elves prophecies magic political intrigue and whatever other junk most fantasy authors like to fish out of the recycling bin It was oddly refreshing even if it's only because I've not read much historical fiction beforeIt's also a lot of what I would call military pr0n of the medieval variety One of Cromwell's hallmarks seems to be that he takes an imaginary character such as the aforementioned Thomas of Hookton and slips him in to real historical events like this battle or that siege or that some other big event that generally takes a name according to the The Verb of Location standard Cromwell then goes to great delightful lengths to describe the tactics and strategies that each side used steeping the whole thing in human drama from a soldier's point of view At times it read a bit like the instruction manual to a real time strategy game like Age of Empires with detailed explanations about how the English placed their pike men along a low ridge that gave them an attack bonus against mounted infantry that stacked with their terrain bonuses AND faction attributes Well maybe it wasn't that blatant but I still dig that kind of thing And casting the main character in the role of an English Archer with his big ole longbow though oddly it was never called by that name gave him a good excuse to teach us all about archery and the overwhelmingly effective use of such archers in warfare Fun stuffBut even if there was a history cum videogame abstraction to the battles at times I was nonetheless struck by how incredibly savage and harsh warfare apparently was in those days Cornwell didn't shy away from vivid descriptions of bloody hand to hand fighting and brutal tactics that don't much resemble the romanticized image of a chivalrous knight of the Round Table I was also forced to admit that Cornwell writes some of the best insults I've ever seen When one side accuses the other of being turds birthed from Satan's own arse that's the kind of curse that you just gotta sit up and admireWhat about the story? Well it's nothing too fantastic mainly following Thomas around as he follows the trail of the Holy Grail while being pursued by his villainous cousin Well when he's not busy being an archer bedding wenches he goes through three love interests in a very James Bond esue fashion in the course of the trilogy laying siege to castles and getting tortured by the Spanish Inuisition which by the way everybody expected as soon as the first Dominican priest was introduced contrary to what any flying circus tells you But while his path is circuitous this is the uest that ties all the books together and it's resolved nicely at the end so that I was left with a satisfied feeling that I had seen something that was entertaining and a bit educational but not necessarily full of itself

  6. Lisa Rathbun Lisa Rathbun says:

    I really enjoyed this series although the brutal violence and the constant blasphemies were rather hair raising The constant turns of Fortune's wheel kept me riveted to the story Thomas is triumphant Thomas is excommunicated Thomas is a fugitive etcHow absolutely frightening was the power of the church How horrible to see Christianity misused by evil men for selfish greed I am so thankful for God's Word available to read so we need not kowtow in fear and ignorance to the demands of an organized church It really really bugged me that the vicious godless killlers of Thomas's company condemned and rejected Genevieve so readily just because the church named her a heretic Characters could see the evil self serving cruel behavior of churchmen and still thought that the priests could speak for God As Thomas said We only know God through His Church Thank the Lord I have the Scriptures to help me know God BTW I really liked Abbot PlanchardNote to myself This isn't a particularly literary reference but Guy Vexille reminded me of a character in the movie Serenity or the TV show Firefly who did evil things in order to bring in a perfect world Guy said The world is beset by evil and the Church is corrupt and the devil does his work unhindered If we have the Grail we can change that The Church can be cleansed a new crusade can scour the world of sin It will bring the kingdom of Heaven to earth We shall take the world Thomas and open it to the love of God All the grace and beauty of God poured onto the world No sadness no sin just the harmony of God in a world of peace So incredibly creepy to see men of evil who think they are good

  7. Ed Ed says:

    This is the best of the three book Grail Series Cornwell manages to tie up all the loose ends while providing the reader with a satisfactory conclusion that does not strain one's credulityThe story opens with the siege of Calais and ends with the first of the plagues that ravaged Europe for hundreds of years In between Thomas of Hookton continues his uest for the Holy Grail which his family is supposed to have or have had in its possessionIn the process he is given an order to try and find the Grail by his liege Lord The Duke of Northumberland He begins by capturing a castle in France as a base of operations saves an accused heretic Genevieve from being burned at the stake falls in love with her is deemed a heretic himself hides out in a monastery near his ancestral home escapes those who would torture him to find out what he knows returns to his soldiers fights a last battle in the midst of the plague and ends up in England with GenvieveAs is always the case with Cornwell's writing the battle scenes are second to none The characters are slightly stereotyped but not so badly that it detracts from the exciting plotA very good read

  8. LOUISE FIELDER LOUISE FIELDER says:

    Heretic is the last chapter of The Grail uest seriesEven though the author admits there are only 2 historical facts in the whole book at the beginning and the end this is none the less an awe inspiring masterpieceWith vivid battle scenes intriuing characters and heart renching episodes even though the era itself was a time when close relationships were considered a rareity The story was fascinating and spell binding gripping the reader throughoutSorry to see the story of Thomas Genevieve Robbie and their friends come to an endThroughly enjoyable hard to put down

  9. Phil Syphe Phil Syphe says:

    “Heretic” struck me as very different to the first two books in the Grail series A couple of episodes did draw me in but on the whole I found it lacking I do like the main character – Thomas – but missed his Jewish friend who has a passion for checking the colour of people’s urine plus Thomas's one time lover Jeanette neither of which appear at all in this volume I would’ve rated this novel three stars but like all the Bernard Cornwell books that I’ve read to date I’ve deducted a star because they are all let down by substandard elements of style Long winded sentences are plentiful The needless dialogue attribution drives me to distraction whilst the overuse of the word “then” is surprising for such a seasoned authorThis of all the books I’ve ever read may well hold the record of overusing the word “then” Sometimes it’s in consecutive sentences Occasionally it’s used twice in the same sentence The best authors avoid using “then” wherever possible It is achievable to write a long novel without using this word at all except maybe in dialogue but in the main narrative it sounds like a child’s voice Think of a seven year old telling you about their holiday “And then I did this and then I did that and then ’Take this for exampleThen the routiers would take a new oath go to war and fight until a truce was called and then knowing no trade except killing they would go back to the lonelier stretches of countryside and find a town to savageTo start a sentence with “then” or “and then” is particularly bad form First it’s obvious that the above info happens next Second if one was to remove the childish opening and adjust the syntax to eliminate some of the commas and superfluous conjunctions a stronger sentence will be revealedThe routiers would take a new oath They’d go to war until a truce was called Knowing no trade except killing they’d return to the lonelier stretches of countryside and find a town to savageNotice how we have the same info but in fewer wordsI sometimes wonder if Mr Cornwell gets paid per word If his works were thoroughly copy edited they'd be all about 50 pages shorter The story would remain the same but the reading experience would be much smootherThis is a typical long winded sentence kept going by numerous conjunctions punctuation plus this one has a “then” for good measureThe valley where that poor village lay had already been plundered and so he meant to stop in the next valley where a slew of plump settlements were strung along the road south from Masseube and then when his men were busy about their devil’s business he and a few men would ride with Robbie to the hills overlooking Astarac and if there were no coredors or other enemies in sight let the Scotsman ride on aloneThe above mammoth sentence could easily be cut down to three or four concise sentences It would have impact if some of those commas and conjunctions were replaced with full stops To this reader at least the above is like listening to a hyperactive child There are many of this type of sentence all the way through the novelWhat really makes me groan most of all when reading Mr Cornwell’s books is the dialogue attribution The two main annoyances are the repetition of informing the reader who’s talking when it’s obvious which character it is plus the invariable inclusion of attribution after the first few words This is like trying to listen to someone talk whilst another person keeps interrupting This uote shows the last point made above‘I was reminded the other day’ he said ‘of one of the psalms of David'No need at all to insert “he said” It only disrupts the sentence flow The uote below is extremely stupid‘I am Galat Lorret’ Lorret saidIt’s as though the author thinks his readers are stupid This isn’t a Spartacus scenario Nobody in the scene needed to step forward and claim to be Galat Lorret Why insult our intelligence by adding the pointless attribution?Another recurring irritation in this author’s works are his telling the reader that a character is dressed all in black only to follow this up by describing each garment preceded by the adjective blackHe was dressed all in black Black boots black breeches black jerkin black cloak black broad brimmed hat and a sword scabbard sheathed in black clothI’ve lost count of how many times Mr Cornwell has done this in his novels In fact I was part listening to this from an audio recording and guessed the moment the narrator said “He was dressed all in black” that he’d go on to describe each article as being black I shook my head at this childish way of writing You may expect to read this sort of thing in a book for under ten year olds but not in one written by a seasoned authorApart from the overuse of adjectives – something else this author is guilty of along with using too many adverbs – it’s also a waste of words in general Had Mr Cornwell attended creative writing classes at university level and studied the art of English style he’d know that every word in fiction should matter His historical accuracy is always commendable If only he’d spend half as much effort on his use of style Clearly this doesn’t bother the majority of readers who give him five star ratings but to me story and style should complement each other If the style’s not up to standard I’m left distracted by it unable to be drawn into the story I sometimes wonder why I keep reader this author’s works Truth is despite the poor English style his historical knowledge and ability to tell a story are superb If he’s writing about a period or situation that interests me I’ll check it out If he picks something I’m only half interested in however I won’t go near it because of the distracting elements of style I would’ve given up on this one after the thirtieth use of “then” had I only been reading this in PDF format instead of additionally listening to it in audio format

  10. Gabriel Woods Gabriel Woods says:

    This book brought me back in time to an era when The Grail and similar such powerful relics were believed to be real This was a magical time as well was a very violent era when mythology and all things mystical were blended with reality Throughout the book even the most threatening knight or men at arms as Cornwell names the characters who were soldiers despite their strength and prowess in battle to be somewhat naive The soldiers and many people in Europe as described by Cornwell in Heretic often had a belief in the supremacy the Church in every aspect of life The Inuisition could often be the fate of those who did not obey monks and priests The seeking of mystical relics religion the manipulations of lords and kings by monks and priest were often used as a call to war Some soldiers fought for the love of their women Fierce battles were wonderfully written and described in detail and clarityA wonderfully written story Today I am taking another book written by Cornwell The Lords Of The North out from the library my workplace as an author where I do most of my writing and I am really looking forward to reading the novel

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