Julian the Apostate Epub Î Julian the PDF \

Julian the Apostate Epub Î Julian the PDF \

Julian the Apostate [PDF / Epub] ☉ Julian the Apostate Author Glen W. Bowersock – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk This portrayal of one of antiuity's most enigmatic figures offers a vivid and compact assessment of the Apostate's life and reign Proceeding directly from an evaluation of the ancient sources the test This portrayal of one of antiuity's most enigmatic figures offers a vivid and compact assessment of the Apostate's life and reign Proceeding directly from an evaluation of the ancient sources the testimony of friends and enemies of Julian as well as the writings of the emperor himself the author traces Julian's youth his years as the commander of the Roman forces in Gaul and his emergence as sole ruler in the course Julian the PDF \ of a dramatic march to Constantinople In Bowersock's analysis of Julian's religious revolution the emperor's ardent espousal of a lost cause is seen to have made intolerable demands upon pagans Jews and Christians alike.


7 thoughts on “Julian the Apostate

  1. Steve Steve says:

    Julian 3301 363 last of the Constantinian line Julian Seeing Indifference Seeing then that there is great indifferenceamong us toward the gods he says with that solemn affectIndifference But what then did he expect?Let him organize religion as much as he pleasedlet him write the high priest of Galatia as much as he pleasedor to others like him exhorting giving directionsHis friends weren't Christians that much is certainBut even so they weren't able to play the way that he did brought up as a Christianwith the system of a new religionridiculous in theory and in practiceIn the end they were Greeks Nothing in excess Augustus CP Cavafy trans by Daniel Mendelsohn One of the most interesting and controversial figures of the later Roman Empire is Emperor Julian called the Apostate in Christian tradition the half nephew of Constantine the Great and the last of his line all others having been killed off either by Constantine himself or by his son and second in the Constantinian line Constantius Raised as a Christian whose mother tongue was Greek Julian's love for Hellenistic culture became increasingly tightly bound to the old Greek religion so that when he was acclaimed Augustus by his soldiers in Lutetia Paris and started moving his army to meet Constantius in battle he openly declared his religious fealty and announced his resolution to undo the suppression of the old religion initiated by Constantine and eagerly continued by Constantius And he did what he could to carry out his resolution during his brief reign approximately 18 months as Emperor so Julian was demonized by Christians and deified by pagans after his early death Thus very uickly the facts of his life became swamped by a tsunami of propaganda from both sides These mutually contradictory legends have provided a gold mine for later polemicists poets and novelists who have taken what they wanted from this swirling mass and invented the restIn Julian the Apostate 1978 the noted classical historian GW Bowersock has made a careful analysis and evaluation of the sources and brought together the most reliable to present a picture of Julian the man the ruler and the reformer Though Julian was an ascetic and a learned man like one of his heroes Marcus Aurelius I learned to my discomfiture that not only was he a disciple of the burgeoning school of Neo Platonism but he followed the branch of that mystical philosophy which stemmed from Iamblichus the branch in which reason was held in the most disdain as a means to penetrate the mysteries of the world A highly intelligent man he was also irascible and vindictive whenever he was thwarted which was not seldom since he was swimming against the tide While preparing for his fatal campaign against the Persians which was to be the beginning of an effort to extend the Roman Empire far to the East in imitation of his other great hero Alexander the Great he made Antioch his capital and forged grand plans for its transformation into the hub of the Empire But not only was Antioch overwhelmingly Christian and unreceptive to his religious reforms in just a few months he managed to alienate nearly its entire populace with his well meaning but unworldly administrative and economic policies policies that misapprehended the degree to which ordinary people have no desire to be abstemious zealotsIn 363 Julian who had been an undefeated commander of the Roman armies in Gaul led 90000 men against the Persians For a gripping account of that doomed campaign in which Julian was killed by a spear thrown by an Arab in Persian service according to Bowersock that is the most reliable of the many stories that have entered into the legend and in which the Persians reduced the proud Roman army to desperation during their long retreat back to Roman territory I recommend the version in Ammianus Marcellinus' history written shortly after the events and based upon eyewitness reports Among many others Constantine had his own son Crispus and his own wife Fausta killed These include many texts from Julian's own hand some of which I've read in the past week Indeed we have so many of his texts edicts letters orations and various unusual texts that cannot be so simply characterized that Bowersock asserts that we know the man better than any classical Roman with the exception of Cicero


  2. Walter Walter says:

    This was an entertaining and well researched biography of the last pagan emperor of Rome It is an academic work and not a piece of pop history but the material is so damned interesting even a scientist can enjoy and has enjoyed it It traces the unlikely rise of a humble scholar and academic philosopher to the imperial purple Along the way he becomes a great war hero and also parts ways with his family's Christian religion His uixotic efforts to restore pagan religion learning and culture to a world slipping into the dark ages make him a most tragic and heroic character Some of his edicts meant to reign in Christians are very funny He did not hurt anyone or persecute them but rather he tried to help Christians in living up to their ideals eg taking wealth from rich Bishops to distribute to the poor etc When Christians attacked him he published a series of academic works to support the philosophical basis of his program rather than tossing them all to the lions Pretty good show


  3. Dan Dan says:

    I feel like any book about Julian that perpetuates the label apostate must have a pro Christian bias and this one is no exception It's a short and decent intro to the emperor Julian though originally written in 1978 there is certainly newer scholarship about Julian out there It's well researched but the authors bias against Julian definitely shows at some points For example it seems the author thinks that Julian's uestions of consience when he went against Constantius were a bad thing What about Constantius' consience when he murdered his family members including Julian's relatives? I suppose we all must look at the ancient world through the lens of our own experience and beliefs


  4. Katherine Wright Katherine Wright says:

    The book is set out or less as a chronological biography from Julian's birth to his accession to the throne as sole Augustus in 361 From there it takes on a thematic aspect as it describes his policies and movements throughout his time in Naissus Constantinople and then on to Antioch where the narrative picks up again and swiftly carries the emperor to his greatest triumph against the Sassanid Persians at their own capital of Ctesiphon and his final end on the return journeyThe major downside to this work is Bowersock's clear at times vitriolic disdain for the Emperor Julian and many of his policies In the early part of the book he writes seemingly as an apologist for Constantius II portraying him in a far favourable light than most other historians of the period He castes Julian in the mold of a zealot and a bigot and eventually as a persecutor of Christians something which most historians stop short of This is not the book one should read first on Julian as I can imagine it would colour one's views irrevocably against the man Despite this however Bowersock's writing is clear his style engaging and his research clearly meticulous If one is able to see beyond the surface layer of strongly opinionated commentary an incredible amount of knowledge in a short run of pages only 119 for the main section is revealed For that reason this is a must read for anyone with a solid background knowledge of Julian looking to learn


  5. Samuel Valentino Samuel Valentino says:

    A good concise biography This is a second reading of this for me I finished a biography of Valens who came after him and Constantine who came before and thought that I would get out of another reading I did the first time I read it was an introduction for me to the era so I got a lot out of it this time My only complaint is that some of it is too brief the author mentions that Julian was traumatized by the murder of his brother but the book gives little information about him However I noticed the lack only on a second reading when I was first reading it I was found it really informative So a good book on the subject that makes me want to research


  6. Milo Milo says:

    I think this is as far as I know the definitive biography and I'll be rereading it again It's pretty dense but features some interesting dissections of where Julian's account of his life and elevation to the height of power differs from the facts in the historical record He's also good at analyzing the few firsthand sources we have on this troubling figure in history


  7. Colin Colin says:

    I can't help but have a sneaking admiration for Julian He tried it was a lost cause but he tried Can't help but feel fond for an underdog sometimes


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7 thoughts on “Julian the Apostate

  1. Steve Steve says:

    Julian 3301 363 last of the Constantinian line Julian Seeing Indifference Seeing then that there is great indifferenceamong us toward the gods he says with that solemn affectIndifference But what then did he expect?Let him organize religion as much as he pleasedlet him write the high priest of Galatia as much as he pleasedor to others like him exhorting giving directionsHis friends weren't Christians that much is certainBut even so they weren't able to play the way that he did brought up as a Christianwith the system of a new religionridiculous in theory and in practiceIn the end they were Greeks Nothing in excess Augustus CP Cavafy trans by Daniel Mendelsohn One of the most interesting and controversial figures of the later Roman Empire is Emperor Julian called the Apostate in Christian tradition the half nephew of Constantine the Great and the last of his line all others having been killed off either by Constantine himself or by his son and second in the Constantinian line Constantius Raised as a Christian whose mother tongue was Greek Julian's love for Hellenistic culture became increasingly tightly bound to the old Greek religion so that when he was acclaimed Augustus by his soldiers in Lutetia Paris and started moving his army to meet Constantius in battle he openly declared his religious fealty and announced his resolution to undo the suppression of the old religion initiated by Constantine and eagerly continued by Constantius And he did what he could to carry out his resolution during his brief reign approximately 18 months as Emperor so Julian was demonized by Christians and deified by pagans after his early death Thus very uickly the facts of his life became swamped by a tsunami of propaganda from both sides These mutually contradictory legends have provided a gold mine for later polemicists poets and novelists who have taken what they wanted from this swirling mass and invented the restIn Julian the Apostate 1978 the noted classical historian GW Bowersock has made a careful analysis and evaluation of the sources and brought together the most reliable to present a picture of Julian the man the ruler and the reformer Though Julian was an ascetic and a learned man like one of his heroes Marcus Aurelius I learned to my discomfiture that not only was he a disciple of the burgeoning school of Neo Platonism but he followed the branch of that mystical philosophy which stemmed from Iamblichus the branch in which reason was held in the most disdain as a means to penetrate the mysteries of the world A highly intelligent man he was also irascible and vindictive whenever he was thwarted which was not seldom since he was swimming against the tide While preparing for his fatal campaign against the Persians which was to be the beginning of an effort to extend the Roman Empire far to the East in imitation of his other great hero Alexander the Great he made Antioch his capital and forged grand plans for its transformation into the hub of the Empire But not only was Antioch overwhelmingly Christian and unreceptive to his religious reforms in just a few months he managed to alienate nearly its entire populace with his well meaning but unworldly administrative and economic policies policies that misapprehended the degree to which ordinary people have no desire to be abstemious zealotsIn 363 Julian who had been an undefeated commander of the Roman armies in Gaul led 90000 men against the Persians For a gripping account of that doomed campaign in which Julian was killed by a spear thrown by an Arab in Persian service according to Bowersock that is the most reliable of the many stories that have entered into the legend and in which the Persians reduced the proud Roman army to desperation during their long retreat back to Roman territory I recommend the version in Ammianus Marcellinus' history written shortly after the events and based upon eyewitness reports Among many others Constantine had his own son Crispus and his own wife Fausta killed These include many texts from Julian's own hand some of which I've read in the past week Indeed we have so many of his texts edicts letters orations and various unusual texts that cannot be so simply characterized that Bowersock asserts that we know the man better than any classical Roman with the exception of Cicero

  2. Walter Walter says:

    This was an entertaining and well researched biography of the last pagan emperor of Rome It is an academic work and not a piece of pop history but the material is so damned interesting even a scientist can enjoy and has enjoyed it It traces the unlikely rise of a humble scholar and academic philosopher to the imperial purple Along the way he becomes a great war hero and also parts ways with his family's Christian religion His uixotic efforts to restore pagan religion learning and culture to a world slipping into the dark ages make him a most tragic and heroic character Some of his edicts meant to reign in Christians are very funny He did not hurt anyone or persecute them but rather he tried to help Christians in living up to their ideals eg taking wealth from rich Bishops to distribute to the poor etc When Christians attacked him he published a series of academic works to support the philosophical basis of his program rather than tossing them all to the lions Pretty good show

  3. Dan Dan says:

    I feel like any book about Julian that perpetuates the label apostate must have a pro Christian bias and this one is no exception It's a short and decent intro to the emperor Julian though originally written in 1978 there is certainly newer scholarship about Julian out there It's well researched but the authors bias against Julian definitely shows at some points For example it seems the author thinks that Julian's uestions of consience when he went against Constantius were a bad thing What about Constantius' consience when he murdered his family members including Julian's relatives? I suppose we all must look at the ancient world through the lens of our own experience and beliefs

  4. Katherine Wright Katherine Wright says:

    The book is set out or less as a chronological biography from Julian's birth to his accession to the throne as sole Augustus in 361 From there it takes on a thematic aspect as it describes his policies and movements throughout his time in Naissus Constantinople and then on to Antioch where the narrative picks up again and swiftly carries the emperor to his greatest triumph against the Sassanid Persians at their own capital of Ctesiphon and his final end on the return journeyThe major downside to this work is Bowersock's clear at times vitriolic disdain for the Emperor Julian and many of his policies In the early part of the book he writes seemingly as an apologist for Constantius II portraying him in a far favourable light than most other historians of the period He castes Julian in the mold of a zealot and a bigot and eventually as a persecutor of Christians something which most historians stop short of This is not the book one should read first on Julian as I can imagine it would colour one's views irrevocably against the man Despite this however Bowersock's writing is clear his style engaging and his research clearly meticulous If one is able to see beyond the surface layer of strongly opinionated commentary an incredible amount of knowledge in a short run of pages only 119 for the main section is revealed For that reason this is a must read for anyone with a solid background knowledge of Julian looking to learn

  5. Samuel Valentino Samuel Valentino says:

    A good concise biography This is a second reading of this for me I finished a biography of Valens who came after him and Constantine who came before and thought that I would get out of another reading I did the first time I read it was an introduction for me to the era so I got a lot out of it this time My only complaint is that some of it is too brief the author mentions that Julian was traumatized by the murder of his brother but the book gives little information about him However I noticed the lack only on a second reading when I was first reading it I was found it really informative So a good book on the subject that makes me want to research

  6. Milo Milo says:

    I think this is as far as I know the definitive biography and I'll be rereading it again It's pretty dense but features some interesting dissections of where Julian's account of his life and elevation to the height of power differs from the facts in the historical record He's also good at analyzing the few firsthand sources we have on this troubling figure in history

  7. Colin Colin says:

    I can't help but have a sneaking admiration for Julian He tried it was a lost cause but he tried Can't help but feel fond for an underdog sometimes

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