Paperback è The Resurrectionist ePUB Þ

Paperback è The Resurrectionist ePUB Þ


The Resurrectionist ❅ [KINDLE] ✾ The Resurrectionist By Jack OConnell ➞ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk The Resurrectionist is a wild ride into a territory where nothing is as it appears Part classic noir thriller part fabulist fable it is the story of Sweeney and his comatose son Danny Hoping for a mir The Resurrectionist is a wild ride into a territory where nothing is as it appears Part classic noir thriller part fabulist fable it is the story of Sweeney and his comatose son Danny Hoping for a miracle Sweeney has brought Danny to the fortresslike Peck Clinic whose doctors claim to have resurrected patients who were similarly lost in the void but the real cure for his son's condition may lie in Limbo a comic book world beloved by Danny before he slipped into a coma O'Connell has crafted a spellbinding novel about stories and what they can do for and to those who create them and those who consume them About the nature of consciousness and the power of the unknown And ultimately about forgiveness and the depth of our need to extend it and receive it.

  • Paperback
  • 318 pages
  • The Resurrectionist
  • Jack OConnell
  • English
  • 13 December 2016
  • 9781565126787

About the Author: Jack OConnell

Part classic noir thriller part mind bending fantasy The Resurrectionist is a wild ride into a territory where nothing is as it appears It is the story of Sweeney a druggist by trade and his son Danny the victim of an accident that has left him in a persistent coma Hoping for a miracle they have come to the fortress like Peck Clinic whose doctors claim to have resurrected two patients wh.



10 thoughts on “The Resurrectionist

  1. Jason Pettus Jason Pettus says:

    Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography cclapcentercom I am the original author of this essay as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegallyAs some of you already know I have been a twenty year fan and student now of the related 20th century art movements Dadaism and Surrealism ever since first getting exposed to them as an undergraduate in the '80s and in fact is the closest I arguably come to being legitimately scholarly on any topic in terms of the amount of knowledge I have about the movements And as I've talked about here before most famously during my review of the DVD compilation The Short Films of David Lynch one of the things I've learned through such study is that what we in the general culture think of these days as Surrealist is a far cry from how the original Surrealists defined it; because when these original cutting edge artists of the 1910s '20s and '30s the ones being eually defined by the new fields of Modernism and Freudian psychoanalysis declared that they were trying to capture the essence of a dream in their artistic work they actually meant that they were trying to capture the elusive pattern and rhythm of a dream itself the simultaneous logic and illogic that within a dream we so easily accept that is so hard for us to accept when in a conscious state As the decades have progressed though as early Modernism turned into late Modernism Pop Art and finally Postmodernism the entire concept of Surrealism has been sorta co opted by the advertising industry and Hollywood to now mostly mean Hey look Weird sh tWhat this means then is that there's actually two kinds of Surrealism out there now and with discerning fans being able to tell the difference immediately there is the pure old school Surrealism of the original movement authors like Haruki Murakami and David Mitchell who construct elaborate experiments in actually reproducing the logic and emotions of a dreamlike state; and then there is the cartoonish Hollywoodized version of Surrealism where an author simply writes about strange crap hoping that the distraction of the crap itself will hide the fact that there's nothing really compelling behind it And which of these I hear you asking best describes the book under review today the 2008 cult hit and so called contemporary Surrealist tale The Resurrectionist by Jack O'Connell? Well I won't keep you in suspense any; it's the second the second oh Lord it's the second an infinitely frustrating collection of random unexplained weird horsesh t whipped at the reader's face at breakneck speed none of it making any sense and none of it connecting to the other weird random parts basically the euivalent of handing a person a box full of Christmas ornaments and yelling Shake it It's pretty Shake it It's pretty That might be but it certainly doesn't make it good literature nor does it make it an accurate reflection of what a dream is actually like; and that's the difference between someone like O'Connell and an actual Surrealist because O'Connell ultimately hopes that you'll be distracted by the shiny ornaments being shaken about and not notice that there's no actual treeIn fact O'Connell starts throwing out the random crap early and uick in The Resurrectionist; it is the story of sad sack pharmacist Sweeney caretaker of a son named Danny who is in a persistent coma through an accident he still silently blames on his ex wife His life a shambles dealing unsuccessfully with anger issues Sweeney has been lured to a little town called uinsigamond in order to work for the mysterious private Peck Clinic mostly as a way of getting his son accepted into their secretive yet widely admired coma care program But see right here is where O'Connell already starts going wrong with this story by making even the details of the clinic itself inconsistent; although our story is set in the modern world for some reason the nurses all have old fashioned '50s uniforms out there at the forbidding Victorian mansion in the middle of nowhere that serves as the clinic's campus Plus for this being a bizarre private family funded organization one that doesn't share its results or even have a clear mission the entire rest of the contemporary medical community seems to be big enough fans; this is what took Sweeney out there in the first place after all is from having his boring ol' real world doctors in Ohio recommend the clinic to him despite the clinic itself literally being like something ripped out of an old Frankenstein movieNow fans will say that this is exactly how it should be that The Resurrectionist is supposed to be filled with weird crap that makes no sense because that's what Surrealism is; but that's not what Surrealism is at least how the original Surrealists who came up with the term defined it Actual Surrealism is supposed to make sense just the kind of twisted illogical sense that we can only accept while in a dream state; the details of the environment though for just one good example are supposed to actually relate to each other within a Surrealist tale not just exist in their own hermetically weird states alongside all the other bizarre details And that's exactly how this book feels especially the further you get into it that O'Connell simply wrote down a bunch of random stuff that popped into his head and sounded weird to him without bothering to relate any of it to each other or even adhere to the most basic precepts of those concepts Like one of the running ideas in The Ressurectionist is that Danny had been a big fan of this giant children's media empire called Limbo consisting of a hit TV show and action figures and merchandise and a long running comic book and O'Connell even includes a number of issues of the comic in the actual manuscript of the book; but why call it a comic I wonder when they're actually fully narrative short stories? And what hit children's TV show in the 2000s is possibly going to be about a group of eastern European circus freaks in the 1920s who wander aimlessly through a fictional foreign land named after the Yiddish word for Hell living a bleak and torture filled life and spouting existentialist dialogue appropriate for a Beckett play than any Japanimation children's show in existence?Sure it's weird and random I'll give you that; but if all I want is weird and random I can sit at home whenever I want flipping through television channels and watching two seconds at a time of each for two or three hours in a row Like so much of The Resurrectionist that too is weird and random; and like so much of The Resurrectionist that too is not nearly what I'd call an entertaining artistic experience What I want from a Surrealist project is a world that almost makes complete sense but with just a whiff of strangeness around its corners a fleeting glimpse of something moving just on the edge of my vision What I want from a Surrealist project is something that makes me feel the way I do when I'm actually dreaming a moment for example where a friend flaps his arms in the middle of a conversation and flies away and I don't even think twice about it; what I don't want is a collection of random details that all draw undue attention to themselves each of them standing in the corner of the room and waving their arms and screaming Look at me Look at me I'M WEIRD And unfortunately that's mostly what The Resurrectionist consists of with certainly there not being a compelling story holding it all together nor compelling characters nor even a consistent personal styleIn fact here's the simple insulting truth of the matter; that by the time I had reached the end I cared about the story and was invested in the characters so little that I didn't even bother reading the last ten pages simply because I could no longer even follow whatever the hell was going on with the castle and the devil and the chicken boy or whatever the f ck it all was And that's a terrible terrible thing to say about a novel that after reading 300 pages of it you didn't care enough to bother with what's supposed to be the most important ten pages of all and I think says about my opinion of this book than probably anything else I might be tempted to write And I'm tempted to write a whole lot about just how frustrated this book made me starting with the fact that the entire town of uinsigamond made no sense whatsoever Is itin the cyberpunk future? No wait our story's set in the modern day; so why is there this whole district made up of fully stocked warehouses that were all abandoned at a moment's notice for no explainable reason that have all been illegally turned into world of tomorrow neon covered homemade pubs? And what's with the cartoonishly evil bikers? And why do they all keep saying Bangkok when referring to the city? UGH THIS F CKING BOOK In fact you know what? I think I'm just going to cut my losses at this point stop writing this review and just walk away from the entire trainwreck known as The Resurrectionist for good See you later Out of 10Story 09Characters 14Style 66Overall 27

  2. Emily Emily says:

    well i am not really sure what the hell this was about I think it was a very strange story it involves a lot of suspension of disbelief there are a lot of characters that seem important that never flesh out there's a few hairy instances that turn into nothing I don't think i got it I would have given it a two star review but there was enough good writing and creativity in it to merit a three star review but i will not be recommending this book to anyone ever

  3. Tina Tina says:

    It's an absorbing novel with interesting characters an intriguing mystery but a weak ending It seemed like he just didn't know how to end it There were other problems that seemed to crop up around page 225 now that I think about it the use of the serum by the stereotypical bikers and how it took the story from realism to pseudo fantasy; a nagging belief that certain characters who had received a lot of focus before would be forgotten and my wondering about what the point of Spider's chapter was This book would have been a lot better if it had 100 pages and the supporting characters were fleshed out Some characters like Alice just seemed to drop out of the picture after an intriguing back story had been created for them and others like Nadia were never given proper exposition I guess my biggest problem with this novel was that the prose was so well done that I didn't notice all the major flaws with the plot and characters until I finished it And now I feel tricked TreacheryThe freak side story was well worth my retrospective annoyance though and it's a pity that the author couldn't have crafted it into a novel of its own

  4. Timothy Juhl Timothy Juhl says:

    I can describe this story succinctly; a shambles If there was an plotline it might have benefitted the reader if the author had actually provided itSome might argue the style is surreal and the reader has to suspend belief Dream seuences and comic book realities are fine tools to use in storytelling but they must be hung on something if they are to be bought by the readerCharacters are built up only to never be heard from again a bit of foreshadowing is cast only to be left adrift in the void of dropped threadsThe only salvageable component in this novel were the chapters about a troupe of circus freaks on the run from a horrific crime they didn't commit The author should have stayed with this

  5. Bill Braine Bill Braine says:

    Every parent's worst nightmare Literally figuratively and everything in between Not badly told and I got used to the reader on the audio CD fairly uickly he handled a lot of voices well but for what purpose? I've read The Magus the Shining and recently The Keep and they covered similar ground the nature of consciousness and reality gothic andor classical horror Dads running around yelling Danny but with a bit payoff Early on I asked another reader if there was going to be a payoff and was assured there was only to find out that this other reader was hoping I'd be able to translate the unsatisfactory ending SneakyI hope that's not a spoiler

  6. Rachel Jones Rachel Jones says:

    I am a big fan of Jack O'Connell and I usually love his books I liked this one but didn't love it probably because its emotional center is a fatherson relationship That said I still think O'Connell has one of the best twisted imaginations out there right now

  7. Karen Karen says:

    Rated R for language Strange story I couldn't get past the fact that a 6 year old was allowed to read a comic book that had such strange characters and language

  8. Alan Alan says:

    This book came to me used along with a bundle of promotional material dating from the book's original release tucked inside the dust jacket I'd already read and admired O'Connell's Word Made Flesh and read this one earlier in a library edition so I made haste to snatch this copy up from the table where it was languishingThe Resurrectionist is a very different book though from Word Made Flesh despite being set in or rather near the same old New World city of uinsigamond that figures so prominently in that earlier novel that it's almost another character and despite the reappearance of the Old World city of Maisel in Old Bohemia whose ghosts inhabited Word Made Flesh and which here is the setting for the comic book within the book Daniel's favorite story LimboDaniel Sweeney that is He and his father are the central characters here despite Danny being in a coma uncommunicative and bedridden as he has been for uite some time following an accidental head trauma The elder Sweeney I don't think we ever find out his first name is a pharmacist and a widower; his wife Kerry killed herself a year or so after Danny failed to wake up from the incidentSo Danny and Sweeney have moved from Cleveland Ohio to the Peck Clinic in the rusty American Northeast somewhere outside the decaying city of uinsigamond because Dr Peck is—or may be—a miracle worker a literal resurrectionist He has roused two patients from extended comas; Sweeney hopes that Daniel will be the third And Sweeney is lucky; the Peck Clinic needs a pharmacist anywayBut the Peck itself turns out to be an isolated macabre pile of Victorian architecture like a haunted house than a medical facility The staff are oddly confrontational and reclusive their professionalism uestionable The Doctors Peck—father W Micah and daughter Alice—often seem like mad scientists than like the sober researchers Sweeney heard about while he was back in Cleveland Both Dr Alice Peck and the darkly beautiful nurse Nadia Rey seem to be interested in Sweeney as than just a new coworker And Sweeney himself feels unstable prone to sudden rage constantly uestioning his own behavior and that of the people around him while remaining fiercely loyal to Danny and ready to take umbrage at the slightest slightAnd then there's the motorcycle gang—the Abominations—who've taken over the abandoned Harmony Prosthetics factory at the edge of town It's hard to tell where they fit into thingsAnd speaking of people who have a hard time fitting in what exactly do the circus freaks O'Connell's word who inhabit the world of Limbo Danny's favorite books have to contribute to the story? Their own picaresue tale vividly described in chapters set off by both typeface and language from the ones Sweeney himself inhabits seems to have little to do with Danny's plight at least at first but you know it has to fit in somewhere It seems appropriate to mention here that one of the authors who contributed a glowing blurb to this book is Katherine Dunn whose own Geek Love has garnered much praise and admiration including my ownIn my opinion this book doesn't uite rise to the level of surreal intensity achieved by Word Made Flesh but it does come pretty close Despite the mundane trappings Sweeney brings from Cleveland Ohio—the Honda Accord that belches black smoke primarily—the isolated environment of the Peck contributes to a feeling of dislocation that echoes Sweeney's own unsettled mind And the stories of Limbo and of Daniel Sweeney do eventually begin to intersect as an astute reader might hope and fear they mightThe resurrection Sweeney is after the resurrection Dr Peck plans for Danny end up seeming less important than Sweeney's own choices his own decisions about his son's fate and his own resurrection The Resurrectionist may not be uite the work Word Made Flesh was but I think it'll end up sorry I can't resist getting a rise out of you

  9. Daelene Daelene says:

    So disappointed I think I understand where the author was going with the storyline but failed miserably

  10. BRT BRT says:

    Not exactly sure what I just read At first glance it appeared to be a story of a man whose son is in a coma They are trying a new clinic which has had minimal success in re awakening coma patients Tying the father son together is a comic series that the son enjoyed called Limbo The story of the father son is interspersed with the story of Limbo Both stories have promise although the Limbo story line is engaging if almost grotesue Then the whole thing just gets weirdly confusing which would have been OK if there was a stable ending Unfortunately the story just seems to go all Hunter S Thompson on you and they all ride off into a drug induced sunset

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 thoughts on “The Resurrectionist

  1. Jason Pettus Jason Pettus says:

    Reprinted from the Chicago Center for Literature and Photography cclapcentercom I am the original author of this essay as well as the owner of CCLaP; it is not being reprinted here illegallyAs some of you already know I have been a twenty year fan and student now of the related 20th century art movements Dadaism and Surrealism ever since first getting exposed to them as an undergraduate in the '80s and in fact is the closest I arguably come to being legitimately scholarly on any topic in terms of the amount of knowledge I have about the movements And as I've talked about here before most famously during my review of the DVD compilation The Short Films of David Lynch one of the things I've learned through such study is that what we in the general culture think of these days as Surrealist is a far cry from how the original Surrealists defined it; because when these original cutting edge artists of the 1910s '20s and '30s the ones being eually defined by the new fields of Modernism and Freudian psychoanalysis declared that they were trying to capture the essence of a dream in their artistic work they actually meant that they were trying to capture the elusive pattern and rhythm of a dream itself the simultaneous logic and illogic that within a dream we so easily accept that is so hard for us to accept when in a conscious state As the decades have progressed though as early Modernism turned into late Modernism Pop Art and finally Postmodernism the entire concept of Surrealism has been sorta co opted by the advertising industry and Hollywood to now mostly mean Hey look Weird sh tWhat this means then is that there's actually two kinds of Surrealism out there now and with discerning fans being able to tell the difference immediately there is the pure old school Surrealism of the original movement authors like Haruki Murakami and David Mitchell who construct elaborate experiments in actually reproducing the logic and emotions of a dreamlike state; and then there is the cartoonish Hollywoodized version of Surrealism where an author simply writes about strange crap hoping that the distraction of the crap itself will hide the fact that there's nothing really compelling behind it And which of these I hear you asking best describes the book under review today the 2008 cult hit and so called contemporary Surrealist tale The Resurrectionist by Jack O'Connell? Well I won't keep you in suspense any; it's the second the second oh Lord it's the second an infinitely frustrating collection of random unexplained weird horsesh t whipped at the reader's face at breakneck speed none of it making any sense and none of it connecting to the other weird random parts basically the euivalent of handing a person a box full of Christmas ornaments and yelling Shake it It's pretty Shake it It's pretty That might be but it certainly doesn't make it good literature nor does it make it an accurate reflection of what a dream is actually like; and that's the difference between someone like O'Connell and an actual Surrealist because O'Connell ultimately hopes that you'll be distracted by the shiny ornaments being shaken about and not notice that there's no actual treeIn fact O'Connell starts throwing out the random crap early and uick in The Resurrectionist; it is the story of sad sack pharmacist Sweeney caretaker of a son named Danny who is in a persistent coma through an accident he still silently blames on his ex wife His life a shambles dealing unsuccessfully with anger issues Sweeney has been lured to a little town called uinsigamond in order to work for the mysterious private Peck Clinic mostly as a way of getting his son accepted into their secretive yet widely admired coma care program But see right here is where O'Connell already starts going wrong with this story by making even the details of the clinic itself inconsistent; although our story is set in the modern world for some reason the nurses all have old fashioned '50s uniforms out there at the forbidding Victorian mansion in the middle of nowhere that serves as the clinic's campus Plus for this being a bizarre private family funded organization one that doesn't share its results or even have a clear mission the entire rest of the contemporary medical community seems to be big enough fans; this is what took Sweeney out there in the first place after all is from having his boring ol' real world doctors in Ohio recommend the clinic to him despite the clinic itself literally being like something ripped out of an old Frankenstein movieNow fans will say that this is exactly how it should be that The Resurrectionist is supposed to be filled with weird crap that makes no sense because that's what Surrealism is; but that's not what Surrealism is at least how the original Surrealists who came up with the term defined it Actual Surrealism is supposed to make sense just the kind of twisted illogical sense that we can only accept while in a dream state; the details of the environment though for just one good example are supposed to actually relate to each other within a Surrealist tale not just exist in their own hermetically weird states alongside all the other bizarre details And that's exactly how this book feels especially the further you get into it that O'Connell simply wrote down a bunch of random stuff that popped into his head and sounded weird to him without bothering to relate any of it to each other or even adhere to the most basic precepts of those concepts Like one of the running ideas in The Ressurectionist is that Danny had been a big fan of this giant children's media empire called Limbo consisting of a hit TV show and action figures and merchandise and a long running comic book and O'Connell even includes a number of issues of the comic in the actual manuscript of the book; but why call it a comic I wonder when they're actually fully narrative short stories? And what hit children's TV show in the 2000s is possibly going to be about a group of eastern European circus freaks in the 1920s who wander aimlessly through a fictional foreign land named after the Yiddish word for Hell living a bleak and torture filled life and spouting existentialist dialogue appropriate for a Beckett play than any Japanimation children's show in existence?Sure it's weird and random I'll give you that; but if all I want is weird and random I can sit at home whenever I want flipping through television channels and watching two seconds at a time of each for two or three hours in a row Like so much of The Resurrectionist that too is weird and random; and like so much of The Resurrectionist that too is not nearly what I'd call an entertaining artistic experience What I want from a Surrealist project is a world that almost makes complete sense but with just a whiff of strangeness around its corners a fleeting glimpse of something moving just on the edge of my vision What I want from a Surrealist project is something that makes me feel the way I do when I'm actually dreaming a moment for example where a friend flaps his arms in the middle of a conversation and flies away and I don't even think twice about it; what I don't want is a collection of random details that all draw undue attention to themselves each of them standing in the corner of the room and waving their arms and screaming Look at me Look at me I'M WEIRD And unfortunately that's mostly what The Resurrectionist consists of with certainly there not being a compelling story holding it all together nor compelling characters nor even a consistent personal styleIn fact here's the simple insulting truth of the matter; that by the time I had reached the end I cared about the story and was invested in the characters so little that I didn't even bother reading the last ten pages simply because I could no longer even follow whatever the hell was going on with the castle and the devil and the chicken boy or whatever the f ck it all was And that's a terrible terrible thing to say about a novel that after reading 300 pages of it you didn't care enough to bother with what's supposed to be the most important ten pages of all and I think says about my opinion of this book than probably anything else I might be tempted to write And I'm tempted to write a whole lot about just how frustrated this book made me starting with the fact that the entire town of uinsigamond made no sense whatsoever Is itin the cyberpunk future? No wait our story's set in the modern day; so why is there this whole district made up of fully stocked warehouses that were all abandoned at a moment's notice for no explainable reason that have all been illegally turned into world of tomorrow neon covered homemade pubs? And what's with the cartoonishly evil bikers? And why do they all keep saying Bangkok when referring to the city? UGH THIS F CKING BOOK In fact you know what? I think I'm just going to cut my losses at this point stop writing this review and just walk away from the entire trainwreck known as The Resurrectionist for good See you later Out of 10Story 09Characters 14Style 66Overall 27

  2. Emily Emily says:

    well i am not really sure what the hell this was about I think it was a very strange story it involves a lot of suspension of disbelief there are a lot of characters that seem important that never flesh out there's a few hairy instances that turn into nothing I don't think i got it I would have given it a two star review but there was enough good writing and creativity in it to merit a three star review but i will not be recommending this book to anyone ever

  3. Tina Tina says:

    It's an absorbing novel with interesting characters an intriguing mystery but a weak ending It seemed like he just didn't know how to end it There were other problems that seemed to crop up around page 225 now that I think about it the use of the serum by the stereotypical bikers and how it took the story from realism to pseudo fantasy; a nagging belief that certain characters who had received a lot of focus before would be forgotten and my wondering about what the point of Spider's chapter was This book would have been a lot better if it had 100 pages and the supporting characters were fleshed out Some characters like Alice just seemed to drop out of the picture after an intriguing back story had been created for them and others like Nadia were never given proper exposition I guess my biggest problem with this novel was that the prose was so well done that I didn't notice all the major flaws with the plot and characters until I finished it And now I feel tricked TreacheryThe freak side story was well worth my retrospective annoyance though and it's a pity that the author couldn't have crafted it into a novel of its own

  4. Timothy Juhl Timothy Juhl says:

    I can describe this story succinctly; a shambles If there was an plotline it might have benefitted the reader if the author had actually provided itSome might argue the style is surreal and the reader has to suspend belief Dream seuences and comic book realities are fine tools to use in storytelling but they must be hung on something if they are to be bought by the readerCharacters are built up only to never be heard from again a bit of foreshadowing is cast only to be left adrift in the void of dropped threadsThe only salvageable component in this novel were the chapters about a troupe of circus freaks on the run from a horrific crime they didn't commit The author should have stayed with this

  5. Bill Braine Bill Braine says:

    Every parent's worst nightmare Literally figuratively and everything in between Not badly told and I got used to the reader on the audio CD fairly uickly he handled a lot of voices well but for what purpose? I've read The Magus the Shining and recently The Keep and they covered similar ground the nature of consciousness and reality gothic andor classical horror Dads running around yelling Danny but with a bit payoff Early on I asked another reader if there was going to be a payoff and was assured there was only to find out that this other reader was hoping I'd be able to translate the unsatisfactory ending SneakyI hope that's not a spoiler

  6. Rachel Jones Rachel Jones says:

    I am a big fan of Jack O'Connell and I usually love his books I liked this one but didn't love it probably because its emotional center is a fatherson relationship That said I still think O'Connell has one of the best twisted imaginations out there right now

  7. Karen Karen says:

    Rated R for language Strange story I couldn't get past the fact that a 6 year old was allowed to read a comic book that had such strange characters and language

  8. Alan Alan says:

    This book came to me used along with a bundle of promotional material dating from the book's original release tucked inside the dust jacket I'd already read and admired O'Connell's Word Made Flesh and read this one earlier in a library edition so I made haste to snatch this copy up from the table where it was languishingThe Resurrectionist is a very different book though from Word Made Flesh despite being set in or rather near the same old New World city of uinsigamond that figures so prominently in that earlier novel that it's almost another character and despite the reappearance of the Old World city of Maisel in Old Bohemia whose ghosts inhabited Word Made Flesh and which here is the setting for the comic book within the book Daniel's favorite story LimboDaniel Sweeney that is He and his father are the central characters here despite Danny being in a coma uncommunicative and bedridden as he has been for uite some time following an accidental head trauma The elder Sweeney I don't think we ever find out his first name is a pharmacist and a widower; his wife Kerry killed herself a year or so after Danny failed to wake up from the incidentSo Danny and Sweeney have moved from Cleveland Ohio to the Peck Clinic in the rusty American Northeast somewhere outside the decaying city of uinsigamond because Dr Peck is—or may be—a miracle worker a literal resurrectionist He has roused two patients from extended comas; Sweeney hopes that Daniel will be the third And Sweeney is lucky; the Peck Clinic needs a pharmacist anywayBut the Peck itself turns out to be an isolated macabre pile of Victorian architecture like a haunted house than a medical facility The staff are oddly confrontational and reclusive their professionalism uestionable The Doctors Peck—father W Micah and daughter Alice—often seem like mad scientists than like the sober researchers Sweeney heard about while he was back in Cleveland Both Dr Alice Peck and the darkly beautiful nurse Nadia Rey seem to be interested in Sweeney as than just a new coworker And Sweeney himself feels unstable prone to sudden rage constantly uestioning his own behavior and that of the people around him while remaining fiercely loyal to Danny and ready to take umbrage at the slightest slightAnd then there's the motorcycle gang—the Abominations—who've taken over the abandoned Harmony Prosthetics factory at the edge of town It's hard to tell where they fit into thingsAnd speaking of people who have a hard time fitting in what exactly do the circus freaks O'Connell's word who inhabit the world of Limbo Danny's favorite books have to contribute to the story? Their own picaresue tale vividly described in chapters set off by both typeface and language from the ones Sweeney himself inhabits seems to have little to do with Danny's plight at least at first but you know it has to fit in somewhere It seems appropriate to mention here that one of the authors who contributed a glowing blurb to this book is Katherine Dunn whose own Geek Love has garnered much praise and admiration including my ownIn my opinion this book doesn't uite rise to the level of surreal intensity achieved by Word Made Flesh but it does come pretty close Despite the mundane trappings Sweeney brings from Cleveland Ohio—the Honda Accord that belches black smoke primarily—the isolated environment of the Peck contributes to a feeling of dislocation that echoes Sweeney's own unsettled mind And the stories of Limbo and of Daniel Sweeney do eventually begin to intersect as an astute reader might hope and fear they mightThe resurrection Sweeney is after the resurrection Dr Peck plans for Danny end up seeming less important than Sweeney's own choices his own decisions about his son's fate and his own resurrection The Resurrectionist may not be uite the work Word Made Flesh was but I think it'll end up sorry I can't resist getting a rise out of you

  9. Daelene Daelene says:

    So disappointed I think I understand where the author was going with the storyline but failed miserably

  10. BRT BRT says:

    Not exactly sure what I just read At first glance it appeared to be a story of a man whose son is in a coma They are trying a new clinic which has had minimal success in re awakening coma patients Tying the father son together is a comic series that the son enjoyed called Limbo The story of the father son is interspersed with the story of Limbo Both stories have promise although the Limbo story line is engaging if almost grotesue Then the whole thing just gets weirdly confusing which would have been OK if there was a stable ending Unfortunately the story just seems to go all Hunter S Thompson on you and they all ride off into a drug induced sunset

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *