Qué que vio el perro y otras aventuras PDF Þ Qué

Qué que vio el perro y otras aventuras PDF Þ Qué



10 thoughts on “Qué que vio el perro y otras aventuras

  1. Diane Diane says:

    This is an interesting collection of Malcolm Gladwell s writings that were originally published in The New Yorker In the preface, Gladwell says this collection includes his favorite articles I ve read most of his books, and What the Dog Saw is a similarly fun mix of popular sociology, psychology, economics, social history and marketing My favorite articles in the bunch were the ones on Ron Popeil, hair color, Cesar Millan, homelessness, plagiarism, criminal profiling and pit bulls Gladwell is an engaging writer, and I think this collection works so well because the articles are just the right length Sometimes his books can drag out a subject too long, but like Goldilocks, this book felt just right If you like audiobooks, Gladwell is a good narrator, and these articles are fun to listen to Highly recommended for Gladwell fans.Opening PassageWhen I was a small child, I used to sneak into my father s study and leaf through the papers on his desk He is a mathematician He wrote on graph paper, in pencil long rows of neatly written numbers and figures I would sit on the edge of his chair and look at each page with puzzlement and wonder It seemed miraculous, first of all, that he got paid for what seemed, at the time, like gibberish But important, I couldn t get over the fact that someone whom I loved so dearly did something every day, inside his own head, that I could not begin to understand.This was actually a version of what I would later learn psychologists call the other minds problem One year olds think that if they like Goldfish Crackers, then Mommy and Daddy must like Goldfish Crackers, too they have not grasped the idea that was is inside their head is different from what is inside everyone else s head Sooner or later, though, children come to understand that Mommy and Daddy don t necessarily like Goldfish, too, and that moment is one of the great cognitive milestones of human development Why is a two year old so terrible Because she is systematically testing the fascinating, and, to her, utterly novel notion that something that gives her pleasure might not actually give someone else pleasure and the truth is that as adults we never lose that fascination Good Biographical Quote Growing up, I never wanted to be a writer I wanted to be a lawyer, and then in my last year of college, I decided I wanted to be in advertising I applied to eighteen advertising agencies in the city of Toronto and received eighteen rejection letters, which I taped in a row on my wall I still have them somewhere I thought about graduate school, but my grades weren t quote good enough I applied for a fellowship to go somewhere exotic for a year and was rejected Writing was the thing I ended up doing by default, for the simple reason that it took me forever to realize that writing could be a job. Jobs were things that were serious and daunting Writing was fun.


  2. Trevor Trevor says:

    I m very fond of Malcolm Gladwell s writing It is hard for me to not gush about someone who is living a life I would love to live I guess I should feel jealous of him, but instead I just feel grateful to know that someone can live that life And I really love his writing He is a writer who never leaves his readers behind, who is always beautifully clear and who structures what he has to say in ways that not only compel you to go on reading, but also so he takes you by the hand and makes sure you are always alongside him.It is impossible not to feel perfectly safe with Malcolm Gladwell and given that some of these articles are about killer dogs and mass murderers, feeling safe with the writer seems almost obligatory.I m not going to talk about the subject matter of any of these articles I m assuming that most of you are going to eventually read them anyway, so it feels a bit pointless spoiling things for you Instead, I would like to look at how he structures his articles and why I find what he does so utterly compelling.If there is a philosopher that I really admire it is Aristotle I mean, the guy was a genius and dominated Western thought for two thousands years It is fair to say that for a very, very long time Western thought, as far as it was thought , was Aristotelian But I admire Aristotle because he is so different from me, not in the least because I would like to be like him If there is one thing I truly know about myself it is that I am nothing like Aristotle You see, Aristotle was the great categoriser He had a brain that was like a filing cabinet and he could come to something completely new, something no one had ever thought systematically about before and he the remarkable ability to see how to file things away in this totally new subject He virtually created many of the disciplines we study now, such as physics, biology, metaphysics, logic, poetics, and the list just goes on and on.I need to make that a bit clear It wasn t just that he could come to a subject like poetics and say this is not a literal quote, though he does say something similar , the major division is between tragedy and comedy in tragedy a character gets what he deserves, while in comedy a character gets what he thinks he wants It was that he was able to see that the division between tragedy and comedy was a key division If you were going to talk about drama, Aristotle just knew that you had to virtually start by talking about that division and how a play that was a comedy was different from a play that was a tragedy He didn t just invent the filing cabinet, he also put the first labels on the files and then put some gobsmacking content in those files as well.Even while dancing around in my most sunny of dispositions I don t for a moment think that I am anything like Aristotle I really don t do categories in the way he does My mind doesn t quite work that way just as I don t paint like Picasso but I ll tell you what, I love it when I see it.And what has this got to do with Gladwell and his latest book Well, the whole way through this book I kept thinking that Gladwell has learnt so much from Aristotle He has learnt how to play with categories in ways that are pure delight What he does looks so simple and so obvious it is really no wonder that people try and generally fail to copy it It takes lots and lots of hard work to make writing look quite this effortless.I cavalierly started off by saying I wouldn t tell you anything about the articles in this book and now find I have to such are the meanderings these reviews take me on In the last chapter of this book there is a long discussion of what is a Pit Bull Terrier and whether it is the dog or the owner that should be put down after an attack no prize for guessing the answer to that one Except, Gladwell s point is that banning a bred of dog is incredibly difficult, as Pit Bull is a category that is imposed on a wide and various group of individual dogs and as a category it struggles to stretch across all of the dogs it seeks to cover This is because a category is generally selected to identify a problem but the dogs themselves aren t actually the problem it is the as they say in France arseholes that own them That he then used this distinction to talk about the identification of terrorists and why stopping only people who look like Middle Eastern men is a stupid idea almost had me cheering.In another article he deconstructs the category of FBI Criminal Profiler and confounds it with the category of psychic cold reader and not in a complimentary way In yet another chapter he compares our categories of quarterback someone who involves himself in a kind of game mostly played, from what I can gather, in the US and teacher What Gladwell often does is force us to look again at the categories we use to divide up the world and then to see if they really still make any sense In a way, he is doing the opposite of what Aristotle did But either way, I think he does it just as beautifully As a case in point, it may be that my favourite part of this book is where he says at the end of one of his articles that if we are expected to spend so much time outside of the box perhaps we should be getting a new box You know, watching someone do that to a clich particularly one I hate is just about the most satisfying thing I can think of.But he doesn t just tear down old and tired metaphors he also helps to show interesting distinctions between categories we generally think of as being pretty much about the same things Like the fascinating distinction he draws between a puzzle and a mystery Do you see what he does He uses metaphors in the way that they are meant to be used A metaphor can be used in two ways either to stop us thinking or to get us to see something almost as if for the first time Metaphors that stop us thinking are called clich s let s list some to my way of seeing, thinking outside the box, at the end of the day, let s unpack that, we should populate this data set I d better stop or I ll be making myself sick Metaphors can do better than that, though They can also be used to instruct us in things we don t know anything about and they do that by comparing the new thing to those things we think we already know very well In this book when Gladwell discusses how he would like to distinguish between a puzzle and a mystery he uses the example of the sorts of questions that might have been asked during cold war spying on Russia what is the size of the Soviet economy how many nuclear weapons does China have and then that most amusing of games, where in the world is Osama Bin Laden to show that these are questions that could be answered if only we had enough new data, if we had enough new information These are puzzles They are problems that could be solved if we just had a couple of pieces.A mystery, though, is something quite different To solve a mystery you don t need information one of the rules of mysteries is that you already have all of the information you need The problem isn t that you have too little information, it is that you have far too much and that you have no way of grading the information you ve got into what is important and what is just trivial noise And right there you see a new distinction open up between categories that allows you to think anew about a range of issues that might not have made a lot of sense before Gladwell discusses Watergate as a puzzle and Iraq as a mystery He then has some very interesting things to say about public accounting of private corporations and whether companies providing us with thousands and thousands of pages of information on how they are going is designed to inform or confuse us And then asks if maybe we need to not look at company accounts as ways of solving puzzles, but rather if we might not be better off approaching interpreting the health of a company as a mystery It is possible that this distinction sounds profound than it really is I m quite prepared to admit that but all the same, I m not terribly concerned about that What it does do is to get me to think about that distinction and to wonder about it He does this over and over again in all of his books Needless to say, I really like it.I love Gladwell s stuff He brings so much joy and so much interest to his articles that it is always a delight to read him.


  3. Karen Karen says:

    In What the Dog Saw, Gladwell offers a treasure chest of gems, each shining brightly on their own In each essay, Gladwell usually starts with one puzzling situation and then adds information and other narratives to complicate the topic Then the first situation resurfaces midway and at the conclusion, helping to bring the topic to closure Most of the time, his underlying thesis runs along the lines of Wow, things are a lot complicated or a lot simple than they seem He s obsessed with patterns finding them when they are invisible complicating them if they are widely accepted.I ve been reading all of Gladwell s books, mainly because he comes up in conversation so often I wanted to weigh in This book is his fourth published, but it contains essays published before he started doing book length works As I said in a review of one of his books, I feel as though his book chapters could be shuffled because he struggles to impose an overarching structure This collection of essays showcases him in his element gone is the awkwardness that I find in his book length works I read all his works in a large part to answer this question Why is Gladwell so popular Gladwell s writing is tied to a specific moment in time He s responding to the challenges of the information age a moment in time where people walk around with hand held computers and constantly face the task of making judgements about what information is important and what is trivial He s talking to readers who are drowning in data coming in tidal waves off various screens Gladwell is throwing them a line Here, hold on to this truism, this observation, this law of human behavior Stick with me, and you ll keep your head above water At first glance Gladwell seems to only offer comfort by pointing out patterns amid seeming chaos Not so He most often cautions against imposing patterns where none exist Gladwell uses examples here and in his book length works of inaccurate patterns imposed in fields as diverse as these a military intelligence b stock market analysis c criminal profiling d cancer detection, e nuclear power plants, f animal control, and g the staffing decisions for filling corporate positions, political seats, orchestra musician positions and football teams I suspect that he sells a lot of books to people who are hoping to impose order on things, people and ideas He s very popular with the business set But if you pay closer attention, Gladwell makes quiet concessions that despite all this will to order, we are defeated by chaos, whimsy, serendipity, folly, and gremlins OK, he didn t list gremlins directly I don t think he s telling us to abandon the drive to predict and control, but he s certainly pointing out the hubris in believing that we can do so Consequently, I will now file something with a little fear and trembling But before I do, here are some specifics, motivated by my will to order the details of his book The Pitchman describes the charismatic Ron Popeil, inventor and demonstrator of the Veg o Matic Gladwell describes this amazing pitchman and others of his ilk, contrasting them with actors and ending with the syngergy created when Popeil s methods met live television The Ketchup Coundrum describes how various foods are developed, tested and marketed, but the central example explains why ketchup sells for staying focused whereas mustard and spaghetti sauce have diversified Blowing Up contrasts two methods of investing on Wall Street finding patterns and banking on chaos True Colors draws the curtain back from the marketing strategies for hair coloring, revealing something about the mind of American women and how the women s movement made ripples through this market John s Rock Error explains the rationale of the Pill s inventor as he worked to resolve the science of birth control with his faith as a practicing Catholic What the Dog Saw describes how dogs are highly sensitive to the body language of humans, which explains why Ceasar Milan focuses on training owners as a way to better train dogs Open Secrets retraces the signs of Enron s risky practices and explains why people didn t see what became so apparent after its fall Million Dollar Murray provides shocking data on how the current policies on homelessness actually costs society a great deal of money The Picture Problem presents the complexities of properly reading mammographies, making screening for this type of cancer particularly challenging Something Borrowed discusses the gray areas in intellectual property and Gladwell s own experience of having his words sampled without credit into another person s work Connecting the Dots bears some similarity to the pattern problems discussed in the Enron article and the mammography article in its discussion of how challenging it is to predict acts of war and terrorism not because of lack of information but because of an overabundance of it Blowup again talks about the issue of information overload, this time in the safety procedures put in place in the space program Even though the O rings were viewed as a trouble spot for any space flight, the risk benefit analysis employed allowed the Challenger to launch, which resulted in tragedy Late Bloomers contrasts two forms of genius the young, experimental types vs the older, practice makes perfect type The examples of Picasso vs Cezzanne crystalize his theory, but this essay contains examples for good measure Most Likely to Succeed describes the challenge talent scouts have in predicting an athlete s performance in the NFL based on his performance in college football It turns out that the two games are vastly different, requiring a different set of skills for success Dangerous Minds compares the work of criminal profilers to the work of psychologists, detectives, psychics and other who seek to find a connection between crime and criminal The Talent Myth suggests that the value placed on talent has set up some companies and sports teams to overlook other important aspects of their players Gladwell examines the corporate culture of a handful of companies, such as Enron, Proctor Gamble, and Southwest each time looking at how the leaders evaluate performance, personality and group dynamics The New Boy Network hones in on the job interview as an information gathering task He surveys psychologists, human resource directors, job applicants and bosses in an effort to describe the dynamics of the interview Troublemakers examines the stereotypes about dangerous dog breeds and the statistics for fatal bites As he did in the title essay about Milan s work with dogs, Gladwell moves his gaze from examining the dog to examining the environment fostered by the dog s owner to ask whether or not banning particular breeds really serves as the best response to the problem of dangerous breeds.


  4. Ryan Ryan says:

    One day, I ll find a lively, out of context anecdote that superficially explains why Malcolm Gladwell bugs me Until then I guess he wins Merlin Mann What The Dog Saw is a series of catchy social science essays by Malcom Gladwell, best known for his long form books The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers The book s essays are culled from a decade worth of his writing in The New Yorker.I m on the fence about Malcolm Gladwell On one hand, his books are thought provoking and enjoyable On the other hand, they dabble excessively in storytelling presented as fact Compared to his books, these 20 30 page essays further soften Gladwell s soft science approach by simultaneously making his points less pointed and his subject broad The essays occasionally felt sprawling and fact free, bundling casual observations into a scientific seeming hypothesis With that said, there were a handful of essays here which were truly outstanding.While interesting, I took these essays with a big grain of salt and just enjoyed them for enjoyment s sake If you re new to Gladwell, I d start with one of his books instead.


  5. Riku Sayuj Riku Sayuj says:

    Probably the best Malcolm Gladwell book that I ve read, and I ve read them all.


  6. S.Baqer Al-Meshqab S.Baqer Al-Meshqab says:

    This could be my least favorite book for Gladwell In my opinion, it is usually hard to construct a book that is likeable enough, out of a collection of articles or blogs I honestly didn t expect too much out of it.However, being my least favorite doesn t make it bad It is actually good, real good For a book that compiles several titles, Galdwell did a good job in explaining each idea and support it with social experiments and Statistics I can t say that I liked EVERY article, because I didn t However there were many which piqued my interest In What The Dog Saw, for example, Malcom categorizes failure into Panicking and Choking He states that at time of possible failure, a human could fall into either Thinking too much, or Not Thinking at all Depending on the situation, panicking or choking could lead to either saving that person, or rushing him to his death Another example is the effect of plagiarism should pose on someone life He tells the story of a psychologist invested in studying serial killers who got her book stolen to every last word and turned into a play Was this thing too bad Did it have a good impact on the Society and my most favorite topic is certainly the last one in the book The fate of all Pitballs were determined because of an accident in which 3 small dogs attacked a child, and the state decided that no one could own a pitball Poor dogs Malcom ensures that the cause incident is complex that one may think Banning one species will certainly not gonna solve the problem, and in his book, he shall tell you why.What The Dog Saw is a great attempt in a creating a collection of quite interesting stories which tackles a lot of topics at the heart of Sociology, Economy, and Psychology.


  7. Thomas Thomas says:

    Not my typical reading fare you can tell by the dearth of nonfiction on my Goodreads shelf and the time it took me to read this What the Dog Saw is divided into three sections Part 1 Obsessives, Pioneers, and Other Varieties of Minor Genius, Part 2 Theories, Predictions, and Diagnoses, and Part 3 Personality, Character, and Intelligence.I didn t enjoy Part 1 as much as 2 or 3 because I could not connect with the anecdotes or the characters within each short story They weren t actual fiction stories but little narratives of real events that happened I suppose the fact that I read this portion of the book in a similar way to fiction showcases Malcolm Gladwell s storytelling talent.Part 2 was where I started to get hooked My two favorite stories were Something Borrowed and The Art of Failure Something Borrowed questioned plagiarism and how society perceives it today as opposed to in the past The Art of Failure began with describing a tennis match and transitioned into the difference between choking and panicking.I loved every story of Part 3 I read the entire section in a day Gladwell writes about aspects of contemporary society with a fine felicity This part of the book made buying it worth the money What the Dog Saw is an extraordinary collection of essays that are written with intelligence and precision The research Malcolm Gladwell must have put into each of these stories amazes me now I want to reread some of his previously published works.Want to read of my writing Follow me here.


  8. Tania Lukinyuk Tania Lukinyuk says:

    I finally finally finished it But not because it is boring it is collection of articles by Gladwell, so it does not go down like one single book All articles clearly demonstrate inquisitive mind and quick wit of Gladwell, but not all of them are of equal interest and thrill Some articles feel like they are concocted out of thin air, some are too plain and unexcited But I was fascinated by the stories of colorant revolution in the US, value of talent and specifics of human perceptions at job interviews.


  9. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    A little background I really love Malcolm Gladwell I was first introduced to him through my Persuasion class I took while studying abroad last summer We had to read Blink, his first published book it was one of the most interesting books I have ever read for a class He is no stranger to writing, though His full time occupation is as a journalist for the New Yorker.Why is he so amazing, might you ask I ll tell you Malcolm Gladwell has this amazing ability in his writing to find things that are seemingly unrelated ideas and anecdotes, and relate them to each other in radical ways What the Dog Saw is different than his previous books, in that it is a compilation of articles he has written for the New Yorker, organized around a cohesive idea people who try to understand other people Here s a short summary of each chapter article 1 The Pitchmen This article talks about the original family of pitchmen like Billy Mays Basically the Popeil family is reallyl inventive and can sell people boxes of crap because they re so good at their job not that they would ever sell you a crappy product Not only are they excellent pitchmen, but they would spend countless hours in the workshop One of their inventions, the kitchen rotisserie, had over 200 patents on it alone.2 The Ketchup Conundrum Why is it that there are dozens of kinds of mustard but only one kind of ketchup Well it turns out there are a lot of reasons For example, did you know that there are five kinds of taste Sweet, Salty, Sour, Bitter, and Umami Umami is a recent discovery, as it s much harder to place than the first four kinds of taste It comes from protein and amino acids so it s prevelant in foods like chicken noodle soup and seaweed Ketchup is a rare food that has all five tastes in one and is all perfectly blended so you re not left with the aftertaste of one over another A lot of other reasons, too Who knew ketchup was so fascinating 3 Blowing Up I m a little fuzzy on the details of this chapter because it talked about investments and other stuff that my knowledge is sketchy on It was still really interesting, though Basically it talks about this guy, Nassim Taleb, takes a completely different approach to investments than anybody else His way is harder for people to accept, because it can lead to losing small amounts of money over a long period of time with no risk of losing big time, rather than the current way which is to take a huge risk that can either pay off big or leave you completely destitute.4 True Colors The history of hair dye The story of a beauty product that ended up being deeply connected to women and their changing identities through the fifties and sixties The way in which they were advertised by two women prominent in the advertising industry mirrored the way women felt about themselves and what dying their hair meant to them and the role they played in society.5 John Rock s Error One of my favorite pieces, this article talks about the history of birth control So much info here, about the relevance of Catholicism to the method of the pill, how women s menstraul cycles have changed with modern times and technology, and the medical benefits of birth control being on the pill lowers your risk of ovarian cancer crazy 6 What the Dog Saw This article is about Millan the Dog Whisperer, how he came to his job, how he works with dogs, and with people, and the body gestures and signals that we process subconsciously that leads to his success.7 Open Secrets Enron, the huge scandal of the 90 s, was actually not as secretive as firsts accused Rather, it shows the problem of too much information, rather than not enough Enron did not hide anything so much as they did not explain how their business worked in a way that was understood by the majority of people including most of the people on their executive board.8 Million Dollar Murray Homelessness is actually cheaper to solve by giving them paid for apartments and individual service than things like homeless shelters and soup kitchens In general, the majority of homeless people are not homeless for long it is only a few people that are costing the big bucks, the chronically homeless Fix them, and you fix the bulk of the problem.9 The Picture Problem Another fascinating article for women In overview, reading and interpreting mammograms correctly is a much sketchier process than we might realize He relates it, quite well, to the problem the military has with correclty interpreting infrared pictures of possible terrorist targets.10 Something Borrowed Should plagiarism in writing be that big of a deal He has a personal anecdote here of a woman who wrote a play that became very famous, but was quickly pulled after she was accused by a woman of having her life story blatantly used as the plot of the main character, based off an article that Malcolm Gladwell had written about her While the woman had a legitimate complaint, Gladwell muses about the morality of plagiarism, and the idea that all art and creativity is based off something else, which makes a very fine line.11 Connecting the Dots Was the terrorist of 9 11 really preventable The previous chapter on Enron touches on the fact of too much information can be worse than too little, and that same argument is made here American intelligence agencies had so much information, so many tips , that it became very difficult to separate the fact from the fiction It s not about having the information, but being able to connect the dots between what is already there.12 The Art of Failure What is the difference between choking and panicking Turns out, quite a lot Both create separate physical reactions and come from different places Here Gladwell goes into the plane crash of the Kennedy son, what he was experiencing at the time, and why it happened.13 Blowup Who is to blame for the explosion of NASA s Challenger Human nature wants to say that something can definitely be fixed, or somebody was definitely to blame, for an accident of that magnitude But in reality, it wasn t one big blunder as much as a lot of little calculations, that individually are not considered critical, but all culminated at once to produce a disaster and really, there s no way to prevent against that.14 Late Bloomers Why is it that we only call people geniuses if they come to fruition when they re young Aren t old geniuses possible Turns out, we have another term for them, masters , and the approach of the two are completely different, but equally interesting.15 Most Likely to Succeed How do you hire someone if you don t know who qualifies for the job Gladwell uses two examples here, quarterbacks who transition from college to pro, and financial advisors, to culminate into the idea that the system for hiring public school teachers is in need of a drastic reformation All three of these areas are jobs where it is impossible to tell who is good at it until they are actually immersed in the program.16 Dangerous Minds Criminal profiling, at it s surface, seems an amazing ability of psychologists to get at the heart of a person based of superficial facts of a crime scene However, it may be of a hoax than originally thought, and not really that helpful in catching the bad guy.17 The Talent Myth Are smart people overrated Enron comes into play again, as they had a different outlook on how people were promoted and rewarded in their company If you were smart, if you had talent , you got what you wanted and were given enormous responsibility, whether or not you were really qualified for the task And it may have blown up in their face.18 The New Boy Network If you think about it, hiring somebody based off a piece of paper and spending at most an hour with them in an interview seems extremely superficial and basic So why is it that we make such a big decision based off that Again, subconscious work at play here.19 Troublemakers One of the saddest articles, I think Pit bulls are unfairly stereotyped in several countries, and in many states in the U.S Banned as viscious and human aggressive dogs, the truth points toward the owners of the dogs and the lifestyle the dog is brought up in.


  10. Ana Ana says:

    Each of the articles first appeared in The New Yorker and was handpicked by Gladwell to show us the world through the eyes of various people and even a dog The book is divided in 3 parts Obsessives, Pioneers, and other varieties of Minor Genius, Theories, Predictions, and Diagnoses and Personality, Character, and Intelligence.


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Qué que vio el perro y otras aventuras [BOOKS] ⚡ Qué que vio el perro y otras aventuras By Malcolm Gladwell – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk What is the difference between choking and panicking Why are there dozens of varieties of mustard but only one variety of ketchup What do football players teach us about how to hire teachers What does What is the vio el Epub Þ difference between choking and panicking Why are there dozens of varieties of mustard but only one variety of ketchup What do football players teach us about how to hire teachers What does hair dye tell us about the history of the th century In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers Now, in What the Dog Saw, he brings together, Qué que Epub / for the first time, the best of his writing from The New Yorker over the same period Here you ll find the bittersweet tale of the inventor of the birth control pill, and the dazzling creations of pasta sauce pioneer Howard Moscowitz Gladwell sits with Ron Popeil, the king of the American kitchen, as he sells rotisserie ovens, and divines the secrets of Cesar Millan, the dog whisperer who can calm savage animals with the touch of his hand He explores intelligence tests que vio el Kindle Ö and ethnic profiling and why it was that employers in Silicon Valley once tripped over themselves to hire the same college graduate.

10 thoughts on “Qué que vio el perro y otras aventuras

  1. Diane Diane says:

    This is an interesting collection of Malcolm Gladwell s writings that were originally published in The New Yorker In the preface, Gladwell says this collection includes his favorite articles I ve read most of his books, and What the Dog Saw is a similarly fun mix of popular sociology, psychology, economics, social history and marketing My favorite articles in the bunch were the ones on Ron Popeil, hair color, Cesar Millan, homelessness, plagiarism, criminal profiling and pit bulls Gladwell is an engaging writer, and I think this collection works so well because the articles are just the right length Sometimes his books can drag out a subject too long, but like Goldilocks, this book felt just right If you like audiobooks, Gladwell is a good narrator, and these articles are fun to listen to Highly recommended for Gladwell fans.Opening PassageWhen I was a small child, I used to sneak into my father s study and leaf through the papers on his desk He is a mathematician He wrote on graph paper, in pencil long rows of neatly written numbers and figures I would sit on the edge of his chair and look at each page with puzzlement and wonder It seemed miraculous, first of all, that he got paid for what seemed, at the time, like gibberish But important, I couldn t get over the fact that someone whom I loved so dearly did something every day, inside his own head, that I could not begin to understand.This was actually a version of what I would later learn psychologists call the other minds problem One year olds think that if they like Goldfish Crackers, then Mommy and Daddy must like Goldfish Crackers, too they have not grasped the idea that was is inside their head is different from what is inside everyone else s head Sooner or later, though, children come to understand that Mommy and Daddy don t necessarily like Goldfish, too, and that moment is one of the great cognitive milestones of human development Why is a two year old so terrible Because she is systematically testing the fascinating, and, to her, utterly novel notion that something that gives her pleasure might not actually give someone else pleasure and the truth is that as adults we never lose that fascination Good Biographical Quote Growing up, I never wanted to be a writer I wanted to be a lawyer, and then in my last year of college, I decided I wanted to be in advertising I applied to eighteen advertising agencies in the city of Toronto and received eighteen rejection letters, which I taped in a row on my wall I still have them somewhere I thought about graduate school, but my grades weren t quote good enough I applied for a fellowship to go somewhere exotic for a year and was rejected Writing was the thing I ended up doing by default, for the simple reason that it took me forever to realize that writing could be a job. Jobs were things that were serious and daunting Writing was fun.

  2. Trevor Trevor says:

    I m very fond of Malcolm Gladwell s writing It is hard for me to not gush about someone who is living a life I would love to live I guess I should feel jealous of him, but instead I just feel grateful to know that someone can live that life And I really love his writing He is a writer who never leaves his readers behind, who is always beautifully clear and who structures what he has to say in ways that not only compel you to go on reading, but also so he takes you by the hand and makes sure you are always alongside him.It is impossible not to feel perfectly safe with Malcolm Gladwell and given that some of these articles are about killer dogs and mass murderers, feeling safe with the writer seems almost obligatory.I m not going to talk about the subject matter of any of these articles I m assuming that most of you are going to eventually read them anyway, so it feels a bit pointless spoiling things for you Instead, I would like to look at how he structures his articles and why I find what he does so utterly compelling.If there is a philosopher that I really admire it is Aristotle I mean, the guy was a genius and dominated Western thought for two thousands years It is fair to say that for a very, very long time Western thought, as far as it was thought , was Aristotelian But I admire Aristotle because he is so different from me, not in the least because I would like to be like him If there is one thing I truly know about myself it is that I am nothing like Aristotle You see, Aristotle was the great categoriser He had a brain that was like a filing cabinet and he could come to something completely new, something no one had ever thought systematically about before and he the remarkable ability to see how to file things away in this totally new subject He virtually created many of the disciplines we study now, such as physics, biology, metaphysics, logic, poetics, and the list just goes on and on.I need to make that a bit clear It wasn t just that he could come to a subject like poetics and say this is not a literal quote, though he does say something similar , the major division is between tragedy and comedy in tragedy a character gets what he deserves, while in comedy a character gets what he thinks he wants It was that he was able to see that the division between tragedy and comedy was a key division If you were going to talk about drama, Aristotle just knew that you had to virtually start by talking about that division and how a play that was a comedy was different from a play that was a tragedy He didn t just invent the filing cabinet, he also put the first labels on the files and then put some gobsmacking content in those files as well.Even while dancing around in my most sunny of dispositions I don t for a moment think that I am anything like Aristotle I really don t do categories in the way he does My mind doesn t quite work that way just as I don t paint like Picasso but I ll tell you what, I love it when I see it.And what has this got to do with Gladwell and his latest book Well, the whole way through this book I kept thinking that Gladwell has learnt so much from Aristotle He has learnt how to play with categories in ways that are pure delight What he does looks so simple and so obvious it is really no wonder that people try and generally fail to copy it It takes lots and lots of hard work to make writing look quite this effortless.I cavalierly started off by saying I wouldn t tell you anything about the articles in this book and now find I have to such are the meanderings these reviews take me on In the last chapter of this book there is a long discussion of what is a Pit Bull Terrier and whether it is the dog or the owner that should be put down after an attack no prize for guessing the answer to that one Except, Gladwell s point is that banning a bred of dog is incredibly difficult, as Pit Bull is a category that is imposed on a wide and various group of individual dogs and as a category it struggles to stretch across all of the dogs it seeks to cover This is because a category is generally selected to identify a problem but the dogs themselves aren t actually the problem it is the as they say in France arseholes that own them That he then used this distinction to talk about the identification of terrorists and why stopping only people who look like Middle Eastern men is a stupid idea almost had me cheering.In another article he deconstructs the category of FBI Criminal Profiler and confounds it with the category of psychic cold reader and not in a complimentary way In yet another chapter he compares our categories of quarterback someone who involves himself in a kind of game mostly played, from what I can gather, in the US and teacher What Gladwell often does is force us to look again at the categories we use to divide up the world and then to see if they really still make any sense In a way, he is doing the opposite of what Aristotle did But either way, I think he does it just as beautifully As a case in point, it may be that my favourite part of this book is where he says at the end of one of his articles that if we are expected to spend so much time outside of the box perhaps we should be getting a new box You know, watching someone do that to a clich particularly one I hate is just about the most satisfying thing I can think of.But he doesn t just tear down old and tired metaphors he also helps to show interesting distinctions between categories we generally think of as being pretty much about the same things Like the fascinating distinction he draws between a puzzle and a mystery Do you see what he does He uses metaphors in the way that they are meant to be used A metaphor can be used in two ways either to stop us thinking or to get us to see something almost as if for the first time Metaphors that stop us thinking are called clich s let s list some to my way of seeing, thinking outside the box, at the end of the day, let s unpack that, we should populate this data set I d better stop or I ll be making myself sick Metaphors can do better than that, though They can also be used to instruct us in things we don t know anything about and they do that by comparing the new thing to those things we think we already know very well In this book when Gladwell discusses how he would like to distinguish between a puzzle and a mystery he uses the example of the sorts of questions that might have been asked during cold war spying on Russia what is the size of the Soviet economy how many nuclear weapons does China have and then that most amusing of games, where in the world is Osama Bin Laden to show that these are questions that could be answered if only we had enough new data, if we had enough new information These are puzzles They are problems that could be solved if we just had a couple of pieces.A mystery, though, is something quite different To solve a mystery you don t need information one of the rules of mysteries is that you already have all of the information you need The problem isn t that you have too little information, it is that you have far too much and that you have no way of grading the information you ve got into what is important and what is just trivial noise And right there you see a new distinction open up between categories that allows you to think anew about a range of issues that might not have made a lot of sense before Gladwell discusses Watergate as a puzzle and Iraq as a mystery He then has some very interesting things to say about public accounting of private corporations and whether companies providing us with thousands and thousands of pages of information on how they are going is designed to inform or confuse us And then asks if maybe we need to not look at company accounts as ways of solving puzzles, but rather if we might not be better off approaching interpreting the health of a company as a mystery It is possible that this distinction sounds profound than it really is I m quite prepared to admit that but all the same, I m not terribly concerned about that What it does do is to get me to think about that distinction and to wonder about it He does this over and over again in all of his books Needless to say, I really like it.I love Gladwell s stuff He brings so much joy and so much interest to his articles that it is always a delight to read him.

  3. Karen Karen says:

    In What the Dog Saw, Gladwell offers a treasure chest of gems, each shining brightly on their own In each essay, Gladwell usually starts with one puzzling situation and then adds information and other narratives to complicate the topic Then the first situation resurfaces midway and at the conclusion, helping to bring the topic to closure Most of the time, his underlying thesis runs along the lines of Wow, things are a lot complicated or a lot simple than they seem He s obsessed with patterns finding them when they are invisible complicating them if they are widely accepted.I ve been reading all of Gladwell s books, mainly because he comes up in conversation so often I wanted to weigh in This book is his fourth published, but it contains essays published before he started doing book length works As I said in a review of one of his books, I feel as though his book chapters could be shuffled because he struggles to impose an overarching structure This collection of essays showcases him in his element gone is the awkwardness that I find in his book length works I read all his works in a large part to answer this question Why is Gladwell so popular Gladwell s writing is tied to a specific moment in time He s responding to the challenges of the information age a moment in time where people walk around with hand held computers and constantly face the task of making judgements about what information is important and what is trivial He s talking to readers who are drowning in data coming in tidal waves off various screens Gladwell is throwing them a line Here, hold on to this truism, this observation, this law of human behavior Stick with me, and you ll keep your head above water At first glance Gladwell seems to only offer comfort by pointing out patterns amid seeming chaos Not so He most often cautions against imposing patterns where none exist Gladwell uses examples here and in his book length works of inaccurate patterns imposed in fields as diverse as these a military intelligence b stock market analysis c criminal profiling d cancer detection, e nuclear power plants, f animal control, and g the staffing decisions for filling corporate positions, political seats, orchestra musician positions and football teams I suspect that he sells a lot of books to people who are hoping to impose order on things, people and ideas He s very popular with the business set But if you pay closer attention, Gladwell makes quiet concessions that despite all this will to order, we are defeated by chaos, whimsy, serendipity, folly, and gremlins OK, he didn t list gremlins directly I don t think he s telling us to abandon the drive to predict and control, but he s certainly pointing out the hubris in believing that we can do so Consequently, I will now file something with a little fear and trembling But before I do, here are some specifics, motivated by my will to order the details of his book The Pitchman describes the charismatic Ron Popeil, inventor and demonstrator of the Veg o Matic Gladwell describes this amazing pitchman and others of his ilk, contrasting them with actors and ending with the syngergy created when Popeil s methods met live television The Ketchup Coundrum describes how various foods are developed, tested and marketed, but the central example explains why ketchup sells for staying focused whereas mustard and spaghetti sauce have diversified Blowing Up contrasts two methods of investing on Wall Street finding patterns and banking on chaos True Colors draws the curtain back from the marketing strategies for hair coloring, revealing something about the mind of American women and how the women s movement made ripples through this market John s Rock Error explains the rationale of the Pill s inventor as he worked to resolve the science of birth control with his faith as a practicing Catholic What the Dog Saw describes how dogs are highly sensitive to the body language of humans, which explains why Ceasar Milan focuses on training owners as a way to better train dogs Open Secrets retraces the signs of Enron s risky practices and explains why people didn t see what became so apparent after its fall Million Dollar Murray provides shocking data on how the current policies on homelessness actually costs society a great deal of money The Picture Problem presents the complexities of properly reading mammographies, making screening for this type of cancer particularly challenging Something Borrowed discusses the gray areas in intellectual property and Gladwell s own experience of having his words sampled without credit into another person s work Connecting the Dots bears some similarity to the pattern problems discussed in the Enron article and the mammography article in its discussion of how challenging it is to predict acts of war and terrorism not because of lack of information but because of an overabundance of it Blowup again talks about the issue of information overload, this time in the safety procedures put in place in the space program Even though the O rings were viewed as a trouble spot for any space flight, the risk benefit analysis employed allowed the Challenger to launch, which resulted in tragedy Late Bloomers contrasts two forms of genius the young, experimental types vs the older, practice makes perfect type The examples of Picasso vs Cezzanne crystalize his theory, but this essay contains examples for good measure Most Likely to Succeed describes the challenge talent scouts have in predicting an athlete s performance in the NFL based on his performance in college football It turns out that the two games are vastly different, requiring a different set of skills for success Dangerous Minds compares the work of criminal profilers to the work of psychologists, detectives, psychics and other who seek to find a connection between crime and criminal The Talent Myth suggests that the value placed on talent has set up some companies and sports teams to overlook other important aspects of their players Gladwell examines the corporate culture of a handful of companies, such as Enron, Proctor Gamble, and Southwest each time looking at how the leaders evaluate performance, personality and group dynamics The New Boy Network hones in on the job interview as an information gathering task He surveys psychologists, human resource directors, job applicants and bosses in an effort to describe the dynamics of the interview Troublemakers examines the stereotypes about dangerous dog breeds and the statistics for fatal bites As he did in the title essay about Milan s work with dogs, Gladwell moves his gaze from examining the dog to examining the environment fostered by the dog s owner to ask whether or not banning particular breeds really serves as the best response to the problem of dangerous breeds.

  4. Ryan Ryan says:

    One day, I ll find a lively, out of context anecdote that superficially explains why Malcolm Gladwell bugs me Until then I guess he wins Merlin Mann What The Dog Saw is a series of catchy social science essays by Malcom Gladwell, best known for his long form books The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers The book s essays are culled from a decade worth of his writing in The New Yorker.I m on the fence about Malcolm Gladwell On one hand, his books are thought provoking and enjoyable On the other hand, they dabble excessively in storytelling presented as fact Compared to his books, these 20 30 page essays further soften Gladwell s soft science approach by simultaneously making his points less pointed and his subject broad The essays occasionally felt sprawling and fact free, bundling casual observations into a scientific seeming hypothesis With that said, there were a handful of essays here which were truly outstanding.While interesting, I took these essays with a big grain of salt and just enjoyed them for enjoyment s sake If you re new to Gladwell, I d start with one of his books instead.

  5. Riku Sayuj Riku Sayuj says:

    Probably the best Malcolm Gladwell book that I ve read, and I ve read them all.

  6. S.Baqer Al-Meshqab S.Baqer Al-Meshqab says:

    This could be my least favorite book for Gladwell In my opinion, it is usually hard to construct a book that is likeable enough, out of a collection of articles or blogs I honestly didn t expect too much out of it.However, being my least favorite doesn t make it bad It is actually good, real good For a book that compiles several titles, Galdwell did a good job in explaining each idea and support it with social experiments and Statistics I can t say that I liked EVERY article, because I didn t However there were many which piqued my interest In What The Dog Saw, for example, Malcom categorizes failure into Panicking and Choking He states that at time of possible failure, a human could fall into either Thinking too much, or Not Thinking at all Depending on the situation, panicking or choking could lead to either saving that person, or rushing him to his death Another example is the effect of plagiarism should pose on someone life He tells the story of a psychologist invested in studying serial killers who got her book stolen to every last word and turned into a play Was this thing too bad Did it have a good impact on the Society and my most favorite topic is certainly the last one in the book The fate of all Pitballs were determined because of an accident in which 3 small dogs attacked a child, and the state decided that no one could own a pitball Poor dogs Malcom ensures that the cause incident is complex that one may think Banning one species will certainly not gonna solve the problem, and in his book, he shall tell you why.What The Dog Saw is a great attempt in a creating a collection of quite interesting stories which tackles a lot of topics at the heart of Sociology, Economy, and Psychology.

  7. Thomas Thomas says:

    Not my typical reading fare you can tell by the dearth of nonfiction on my Goodreads shelf and the time it took me to read this What the Dog Saw is divided into three sections Part 1 Obsessives, Pioneers, and Other Varieties of Minor Genius, Part 2 Theories, Predictions, and Diagnoses, and Part 3 Personality, Character, and Intelligence.I didn t enjoy Part 1 as much as 2 or 3 because I could not connect with the anecdotes or the characters within each short story They weren t actual fiction stories but little narratives of real events that happened I suppose the fact that I read this portion of the book in a similar way to fiction showcases Malcolm Gladwell s storytelling talent.Part 2 was where I started to get hooked My two favorite stories were Something Borrowed and The Art of Failure Something Borrowed questioned plagiarism and how society perceives it today as opposed to in the past The Art of Failure began with describing a tennis match and transitioned into the difference between choking and panicking.I loved every story of Part 3 I read the entire section in a day Gladwell writes about aspects of contemporary society with a fine felicity This part of the book made buying it worth the money What the Dog Saw is an extraordinary collection of essays that are written with intelligence and precision The research Malcolm Gladwell must have put into each of these stories amazes me now I want to reread some of his previously published works.Want to read of my writing Follow me here.

  8. Tania Lukinyuk Tania Lukinyuk says:

    I finally finally finished it But not because it is boring it is collection of articles by Gladwell, so it does not go down like one single book All articles clearly demonstrate inquisitive mind and quick wit of Gladwell, but not all of them are of equal interest and thrill Some articles feel like they are concocted out of thin air, some are too plain and unexcited But I was fascinated by the stories of colorant revolution in the US, value of talent and specifics of human perceptions at job interviews.

  9. Rebecca Rebecca says:

    A little background I really love Malcolm Gladwell I was first introduced to him through my Persuasion class I took while studying abroad last summer We had to read Blink, his first published book it was one of the most interesting books I have ever read for a class He is no stranger to writing, though His full time occupation is as a journalist for the New Yorker.Why is he so amazing, might you ask I ll tell you Malcolm Gladwell has this amazing ability in his writing to find things that are seemingly unrelated ideas and anecdotes, and relate them to each other in radical ways What the Dog Saw is different than his previous books, in that it is a compilation of articles he has written for the New Yorker, organized around a cohesive idea people who try to understand other people Here s a short summary of each chapter article 1 The Pitchmen This article talks about the original family of pitchmen like Billy Mays Basically the Popeil family is reallyl inventive and can sell people boxes of crap because they re so good at their job not that they would ever sell you a crappy product Not only are they excellent pitchmen, but they would spend countless hours in the workshop One of their inventions, the kitchen rotisserie, had over 200 patents on it alone.2 The Ketchup Conundrum Why is it that there are dozens of kinds of mustard but only one kind of ketchup Well it turns out there are a lot of reasons For example, did you know that there are five kinds of taste Sweet, Salty, Sour, Bitter, and Umami Umami is a recent discovery, as it s much harder to place than the first four kinds of taste It comes from protein and amino acids so it s prevelant in foods like chicken noodle soup and seaweed Ketchup is a rare food that has all five tastes in one and is all perfectly blended so you re not left with the aftertaste of one over another A lot of other reasons, too Who knew ketchup was so fascinating 3 Blowing Up I m a little fuzzy on the details of this chapter because it talked about investments and other stuff that my knowledge is sketchy on It was still really interesting, though Basically it talks about this guy, Nassim Taleb, takes a completely different approach to investments than anybody else His way is harder for people to accept, because it can lead to losing small amounts of money over a long period of time with no risk of losing big time, rather than the current way which is to take a huge risk that can either pay off big or leave you completely destitute.4 True Colors The history of hair dye The story of a beauty product that ended up being deeply connected to women and their changing identities through the fifties and sixties The way in which they were advertised by two women prominent in the advertising industry mirrored the way women felt about themselves and what dying their hair meant to them and the role they played in society.5 John Rock s Error One of my favorite pieces, this article talks about the history of birth control So much info here, about the relevance of Catholicism to the method of the pill, how women s menstraul cycles have changed with modern times and technology, and the medical benefits of birth control being on the pill lowers your risk of ovarian cancer crazy 6 What the Dog Saw This article is about Millan the Dog Whisperer, how he came to his job, how he works with dogs, and with people, and the body gestures and signals that we process subconsciously that leads to his success.7 Open Secrets Enron, the huge scandal of the 90 s, was actually not as secretive as firsts accused Rather, it shows the problem of too much information, rather than not enough Enron did not hide anything so much as they did not explain how their business worked in a way that was understood by the majority of people including most of the people on their executive board.8 Million Dollar Murray Homelessness is actually cheaper to solve by giving them paid for apartments and individual service than things like homeless shelters and soup kitchens In general, the majority of homeless people are not homeless for long it is only a few people that are costing the big bucks, the chronically homeless Fix them, and you fix the bulk of the problem.9 The Picture Problem Another fascinating article for women In overview, reading and interpreting mammograms correctly is a much sketchier process than we might realize He relates it, quite well, to the problem the military has with correclty interpreting infrared pictures of possible terrorist targets.10 Something Borrowed Should plagiarism in writing be that big of a deal He has a personal anecdote here of a woman who wrote a play that became very famous, but was quickly pulled after she was accused by a woman of having her life story blatantly used as the plot of the main character, based off an article that Malcolm Gladwell had written about her While the woman had a legitimate complaint, Gladwell muses about the morality of plagiarism, and the idea that all art and creativity is based off something else, which makes a very fine line.11 Connecting the Dots Was the terrorist of 9 11 really preventable The previous chapter on Enron touches on the fact of too much information can be worse than too little, and that same argument is made here American intelligence agencies had so much information, so many tips , that it became very difficult to separate the fact from the fiction It s not about having the information, but being able to connect the dots between what is already there.12 The Art of Failure What is the difference between choking and panicking Turns out, quite a lot Both create separate physical reactions and come from different places Here Gladwell goes into the plane crash of the Kennedy son, what he was experiencing at the time, and why it happened.13 Blowup Who is to blame for the explosion of NASA s Challenger Human nature wants to say that something can definitely be fixed, or somebody was definitely to blame, for an accident of that magnitude But in reality, it wasn t one big blunder as much as a lot of little calculations, that individually are not considered critical, but all culminated at once to produce a disaster and really, there s no way to prevent against that.14 Late Bloomers Why is it that we only call people geniuses if they come to fruition when they re young Aren t old geniuses possible Turns out, we have another term for them, masters , and the approach of the two are completely different, but equally interesting.15 Most Likely to Succeed How do you hire someone if you don t know who qualifies for the job Gladwell uses two examples here, quarterbacks who transition from college to pro, and financial advisors, to culminate into the idea that the system for hiring public school teachers is in need of a drastic reformation All three of these areas are jobs where it is impossible to tell who is good at it until they are actually immersed in the program.16 Dangerous Minds Criminal profiling, at it s surface, seems an amazing ability of psychologists to get at the heart of a person based of superficial facts of a crime scene However, it may be of a hoax than originally thought, and not really that helpful in catching the bad guy.17 The Talent Myth Are smart people overrated Enron comes into play again, as they had a different outlook on how people were promoted and rewarded in their company If you were smart, if you had talent , you got what you wanted and were given enormous responsibility, whether or not you were really qualified for the task And it may have blown up in their face.18 The New Boy Network If you think about it, hiring somebody based off a piece of paper and spending at most an hour with them in an interview seems extremely superficial and basic So why is it that we make such a big decision based off that Again, subconscious work at play here.19 Troublemakers One of the saddest articles, I think Pit bulls are unfairly stereotyped in several countries, and in many states in the U.S Banned as viscious and human aggressive dogs, the truth points toward the owners of the dogs and the lifestyle the dog is brought up in.

  10. Ana Ana says:

    Each of the articles first appeared in The New Yorker and was handpicked by Gladwell to show us the world through the eyes of various people and even a dog The book is divided in 3 parts Obsessives, Pioneers, and other varieties of Minor Genius, Theories, Predictions, and Diagnoses and Personality, Character, and Intelligence.

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