Negotiating with the Dead MOBI ✓ Negotiating with

Negotiating with the Dead MOBI ✓ Negotiating with


  • Paperback
  • 248 pages
  • Negotiating with the Dead
  • Margaret Atwood
  • Arabic
  • 09 November 2014

10 thoughts on “Negotiating with the Dead

  1. Fabian Fabian says:

    Thanks to an amazing professor of mine I've become super aware of just how rare these gems are Writers writing on writing I mean can it get any essential? For both the aspiring writer and astute reader To read her poetics with so many citations and so many examples that bring light to the whole art form well it's a rare treat her elevated language sheer accessibility is exactly why we've all come to love anything produced by this Literary Goddess perhaps a few too many uestions are set down; way than the reader ever prepared himself to think about It's rather illuminatingBut her sixth speech is best Sharing the title of the book this one is impossible for the student of lit not to read The thesis is this Writing is a reaction to the fear of death Yup It gets to those profound themes Atwood is never ever not intrepidHonorable mention that Atwood discusses the finances of a writer This is the first time such an intimate thing has even been presented to us by any novelistlie I remember Dave Eggers confessing to his own paycheck for his Staggering Work in its final pages


  2. Madeline Madeline says:

    Atwood writing about how she became a writer what it means to be a writer and why writers do what they doIf in my struggles to be a writer I manage to become even half as talented as Margaret Atwood that will be enough That's really all I can think of to say so I'll just share some of my favorite parts of the book warning I had a lot of favorite partsAround the age of seven I wrote a play The protagonist was a giant; the theme was crime and punishment; the crime was lying as befits a future novelist; the punishment was being suashed to death by the moon This play was not a raging success As I recall my brother and his pals came in and laughed at it thus giving me an early experience of literary criticismAll writers are double for the simple reason that you can never actually meet the author of the book you have just read Too much time has elapsed between composition and publication and the person who wrote the book is now a different person Or so goes the alibi On the one hand this is a convenient way for a writer to wriggle out of responsibility and you should pay no attention to it Yet on the other hand it is uite trueAlice of Wonderland is not the writer of the story about her Nevertheless here is my best guess about writers and their elusive doubles and the uestion of who does what as far as the actual writing goes The act of writing takes place at the moment when Alice passes through the mirror At this one instant the glass barrier between the doubles dissolves and Alice is neither here nor there neither art nor life neither the one thing nor the other though at the same time she is all of these at once At that moment time itself stops and also stretches out and both writer and reader have all the time not in the worldtalking about growing up in the 50s You could not advertise sanitary products for women and call them what they were which gave rise to a degree of surrealism unmatched in advertising since I remember in particular a woman in a white Grecian style evening gown standing on a marble staircase and gazing out over the sea with a caption under her that said 'ModessBecause' Because what? I wondered as a child This is a uestion that still recurs in dreamsThe title of this chapter is 'Negotiating with the Dead' and its hypothesis is that not just some but all writing of the narrative kind and perhaps all writing is motivated deep down by a fear of and a fascination with mortality by a desire to make the risky trip to the Underworld and to bring something or someone back from the deadYou may find the subject a little peculiar It is a little peculiar Writing itself is a little peculiar


  3. Théodore Théodore says:

    The volume represents not only a guide for the future writers but also a biography of the author written in a literary style but this aspect has rather a background role The uestions from which the approach starts are some simple elementary ones in the case of anyone who decides to become a writer And what however is the act of writing as a human activity as a slave labor or perhaps as an art ? What is the different for ex comparated to painting music or theater ? Is the writer an unrecognized legislator of the world as Shelley proclaimed or is it a crying wreck beloved by contemporary biographers ? In short who do you write to ? Why ? Were does everything come from ? In fact nor even the writers have a coherent picture of themselves about their role in society As much as despise themselves they love themselves a compensatory narcissism of course The author does not give clear answers to all this puzzles Finally an answer is prefigured but after all these uestions I don't know to what extent the reader is satisfied If you are an artist being a good man is uite irrelevant if we talk about actual accomplishments Moral perfection does not make up for the impression that you are a bad artist However being a good or a bad man is important if you happen to be a good wizzard to create illusions that can convince people that they are true MAtwood's book is a problematic oneThe uestions propose a reconsideration of the act of writing After all writing is an act with uite serious implications since it is related to the anxiety of death As we are saw in the title it is a negotating with death To what extent does this negotiation have moral values in relation to society it is up to each writer to decide Margaret Atwood just poses the problem She just ask


  4. W.D. Clarke W.D. Clarke says:

    35Four stars for the first three of these Empson Lectures three stars for the second trio where it felt like Ms Atwood wasn't uite as inspired as in the first half I was really rooting for this one for some reason in spite of the fact that I was largely unmoved by the two novels of hers Surfacing and The Handmaid's Tale that I've read Perhaps it is because she's been under the gun of late because of her intervention to use the horrid academese—anyone care to interrogate that? in those tempests in a teaspoon not in absolute terms to be sure but from an outsider's perspective perhaps—they were both uite the literary furors here in Canada easily bigger than anything else on our cultural horizon the Joseph Boyden cultural apropriation and Steven Galloway sexual harassment Affairs MA came to the defense of both authors and social media ate her for lunch So maybe I have a soft spot for underdogs as she currently feels like one to me in spite of the global mega success of the Hulu series based upon The Handmaid's Tale excellent BTWAs I said my admittedly limited acuaintance with her fiction did not stir me much but her poetry— that amazing voice of hers has always been something special and she brings that voice to this volume in a major way The first lecture Who Do You Think You Are? could have easily gone on at book length as far as I was concerned as her dry wit made the details of this her abridged writer's autobiography really sing for me And there seems to be much of the writer herself too in the second essay Duplicity where Atwood dives into the difference between the writing and the uotidian selves She starts to pull back away from taking any kind of stand in the next two essay lectures though The Great God Pen and Temptation where she lays out a variety of higher callings that the writer may serve Mammon Art for Art's Sake and Social Relevance it is just when you most want her to stake some kind of claim about literary value about the novel's conflicted contridictory relationship to the market and thus to its own birth and coming of age story the novel's own Künstlerroman that MA begins the process of removing herself from this book and with thereby contenting herself with merely laying out the various alternate routes that the writer and the novel could take without ever once returning as MA herself to tell us which route or combination thereof she took and why THAT was what I was hoping for in this book and receiving of it might have brought me back to her novels with renewed interest but alas she sits on the fence for the remainder of the series of lectures and though we are treated to a still interesting synopticon of the wide range and depth of her own reading for instance I should have guessed beforehand —but didn't—that she would love Borges yet who'da thunk that ol' DFW would get a look in and even Uncle Don Delillo for godsakes—gotta luv her to death for that we just don't see enough of what Margaret Atwood thinks on very much I'm afraidThus did I limp my way through the last two essays on the writer's relations with the reader and with the dead—the later being the most anticipated and least enjoyed by yours truly Oh I was hoping I guess to get a practicing writer's response to the importance of capital T Tradition—cf Harold Bloom's thesis about how to borrow from Marx the tradition of all dead generations weighs like a nightmare on the brains of the living But alas I closed the book with a sigh remembering the excitement of the first third of the book but feeling that much of it was really a missed opportunity for both of us writer and reader


  5. Linda Linda says:

    Margaret Atwood claims she is just a regular person but this book leaves no doubt about that claim She isn't Written in response to a reuest to be the Empson lecturer at the University of Cambridge a series of five lectures here worked into chapters explains how it is to be a writer One how that resonated with me was the writer as a creator and the writer as a person who does the laundry; the dishes and puts gas in the car She writes beautifully about the duality of this relationship She also writes about how painful it is to be the writer and meet the people who revere your writing Atwood who received her undergraduate degree from Victoria College at the University of Toronto and her master's degree from Radcliffe College has written a truly scholarly work in NEGOTIATING WITH THE DEAD The title refers to the the dead authors to whom we all owe so much and to our dead ancestors whose stories we are all compelled to tell one way or another References to legions of writers and literature is thankfully cited in ten pages of bibliography These citations are so successfully used in this work that we the reader want to read them in full Atwood's point of view is always en pointe which adds accessability to this for me formidable work A true treasure


  6. Britta Böhler Britta Böhler says:

    Interesting but at times a bit too 'fluffy' for my taste35 rounded down


  7. Nicky Nicky says:

    Margaret Atwood is I tentatively conclude not really the kind of writer I truly enjoy I can appreciate her work but I don't fall in love with it I'm not sure why altogether partially perhaps because I think I could pinpoint her as the author of something without knowing Her style gets between me and the narrativeHer style is apparent even in her non fiction book about writing It's a collection of connected essays The essays didn't feel particularly conclusive though Interesting yes and well written in terms of metaphor and uotations I love the classical references but I haven't come out of it with a true understanding of what Atwood believes about writing let alone with anything I can apply to my own writing


  8. Kate Savage Kate Savage says:

    I was reminded of something a medical student said to me about the interior of the human body forty years ago “It’s dark in there”Possibly then writing has to do with darkness and a desire or perhaps a compulsion to enter it and with luck to illuminate it and to bring something back out to the light This book is about that kind of darkness and that kind of desire AtwoodThe writers I love are the ones who say writing is an act of sinking emptiness the shock of the void and the pleasure of the shock Kafka Cixous Lispector Duras And Atwood sounds like them when she explains that the person whose name is on the book might be pleasant and mild it's just that they have a double a parasite in the brain she writes that the internal writer is something like a necrophiliac tape worm made of ink But Atwood isn't as far gone into the Dark Arts of Writing as the others after all she can keep her head above water enough to craft a functioning plot while the other names mentioned are wide eyed with the fishes That makes this book somewhere between the fruitfully insane and the uninspiringly helpful between Cixous' Three Steps on the Ladder of Writing and Bradbury's Zen in the Art of Writing and is probably The Answer for those who conclude that moderation is the key to most mysteriesFor instance Atwood considers the reason for writing Is it simply to write Art for Art's Sake? If so won’t you end up making the euivalent of verbal doilies for the gilded armchairs in the Palace of Art? But if instead you choose Social Relevance Will you end up on a panel discussion and if so is it the panel discussion in Hell? Her books testify to the importance of never uite solving this uestionRead this if you're a writer especially if you love that dizzying inward movement of reading writers writing about writing for readers


  9. Magda Magda says:

    Interesting treatise on writing from various perspectives the inherent duplicity of a writer's persona the relationship between the writer and the reader and most intriguingly the role of the writer as a mediator between this world and the Beyond hence the title of the book For someone like me who's in the writing a thesis while churning out essays 247 part of her life this book contained one particularly important piece of advice on writerly resilience Get back on the horse that threw you p xviii Ergo don't stop writing even if it sometimes leaves you heaving for breath on the ground for haven't we all been there? Either figuratively or literally or both


  10. Victoria Rose Victoria Rose says:

    35 Not as readable as her fiction but really absorbing for those who have an interest in the art of writing or being a writer although it often slips into philosophy when discussing ideas Tons and tons of references to literature and a really great insight into Atwood's mind My favourite essay was on the author as two dual personalities Sometimes I felt that I was not intelligent enough to really 'get' some of her thought processes though


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Negotiating with the Dead❰PDF / Epub❯ ★ Negotiating with the Dead Author Margaret Atwood – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk يأتى هذا الكتاب ثمره لما حققته الكاتبه الكنديه مارجريت أتوود من تميز فى الأدب والنقد على مدى أربعين عامًا، وه يأتى هذا الكتاب ثمره لما حققته الكاتبه الكنديه مارجريت أتوود من تميز فى الأدب والنقد على مدى أربعين عامًا، وهو مجموعه من المحاضرات الأدبيه التى ألقتها فى جامعه كامبريدج يتعرض الكتاب للعديد من الأسئله التى يطرحها الكتّاب على أنفسهم، ويطرحها عليهم القراء أيضًا، فما الذى يجعل شخصًا كاتبًا دون آخر؟ لماذا يكتب الكتاب؟ وما الكتابه؟ ومن أين تأتى؟إلى غير ذلك.


About the Author: Margaret Atwood

Margaret Atwood was born in in Ottawa and grew up in northern Ontario uebec and Toronto She received her undergraduate degree from Victoria College at the University of Toronto and her master's degree from Radcliffe CollegeThroughout her writing career Margaret Atwood has received numerous awards and honourary degrees She is the author of than thirty five volumes of poetry childr.


10 thoughts on “Negotiating with the Dead

  1. Fabian Fabian says:

    Thanks to an amazing professor of mine I've become super aware of just how rare these gems are Writers writing on writing I mean can it get any essential? For both the aspiring writer and astute reader To read her poetics with so many citations and so many examples that bring light to the whole art form well it's a rare treat her elevated language sheer accessibility is exactly why we've all come to love anything produced by this Literary Goddess perhaps a few too many uestions are set down; way than the reader ever prepared himself to think about It's rather illuminatingBut her sixth speech is best Sharing the title of the book this one is impossible for the student of lit not to read The thesis is this Writing is a reaction to the fear of death Yup It gets to those profound themes Atwood is never ever not intrepidHonorable mention that Atwood discusses the finances of a writer This is the first time such an intimate thing has even been presented to us by any novelistlie I remember Dave Eggers confessing to his own paycheck for his Staggering Work in its final pages

  2. Madeline Madeline says:

    Atwood writing about how she became a writer what it means to be a writer and why writers do what they doIf in my struggles to be a writer I manage to become even half as talented as Margaret Atwood that will be enough That's really all I can think of to say so I'll just share some of my favorite parts of the book warning I had a lot of favorite partsAround the age of seven I wrote a play The protagonist was a giant; the theme was crime and punishment; the crime was lying as befits a future novelist; the punishment was being suashed to death by the moon This play was not a raging success As I recall my brother and his pals came in and laughed at it thus giving me an early experience of literary criticismAll writers are double for the simple reason that you can never actually meet the author of the book you have just read Too much time has elapsed between composition and publication and the person who wrote the book is now a different person Or so goes the alibi On the one hand this is a convenient way for a writer to wriggle out of responsibility and you should pay no attention to it Yet on the other hand it is uite trueAlice of Wonderland is not the writer of the story about her Nevertheless here is my best guess about writers and their elusive doubles and the uestion of who does what as far as the actual writing goes The act of writing takes place at the moment when Alice passes through the mirror At this one instant the glass barrier between the doubles dissolves and Alice is neither here nor there neither art nor life neither the one thing nor the other though at the same time she is all of these at once At that moment time itself stops and also stretches out and both writer and reader have all the time not in the worldtalking about growing up in the 50s You could not advertise sanitary products for women and call them what they were which gave rise to a degree of surrealism unmatched in advertising since I remember in particular a woman in a white Grecian style evening gown standing on a marble staircase and gazing out over the sea with a caption under her that said 'ModessBecause' Because what? I wondered as a child This is a uestion that still recurs in dreamsThe title of this chapter is 'Negotiating with the Dead' and its hypothesis is that not just some but all writing of the narrative kind and perhaps all writing is motivated deep down by a fear of and a fascination with mortality by a desire to make the risky trip to the Underworld and to bring something or someone back from the deadYou may find the subject a little peculiar It is a little peculiar Writing itself is a little peculiar

  3. Théodore Théodore says:

    The volume represents not only a guide for the future writers but also a biography of the author written in a literary style but this aspect has rather a background role The uestions from which the approach starts are some simple elementary ones in the case of anyone who decides to become a writer And what however is the act of writing as a human activity as a slave labor or perhaps as an art ? What is the different for ex comparated to painting music or theater ? Is the writer an unrecognized legislator of the world as Shelley proclaimed or is it a crying wreck beloved by contemporary biographers ? In short who do you write to ? Why ? Were does everything come from ? In fact nor even the writers have a coherent picture of themselves about their role in society As much as despise themselves they love themselves a compensatory narcissism of course The author does not give clear answers to all this puzzles Finally an answer is prefigured but after all these uestions I don't know to what extent the reader is satisfied If you are an artist being a good man is uite irrelevant if we talk about actual accomplishments Moral perfection does not make up for the impression that you are a bad artist However being a good or a bad man is important if you happen to be a good wizzard to create illusions that can convince people that they are true MAtwood's book is a problematic oneThe uestions propose a reconsideration of the act of writing After all writing is an act with uite serious implications since it is related to the anxiety of death As we are saw in the title it is a negotating with death To what extent does this negotiation have moral values in relation to society it is up to each writer to decide Margaret Atwood just poses the problem She just ask

  4. W.D. Clarke W.D. Clarke says:

    35Four stars for the first three of these Empson Lectures three stars for the second trio where it felt like Ms Atwood wasn't uite as inspired as in the first half I was really rooting for this one for some reason in spite of the fact that I was largely unmoved by the two novels of hers Surfacing and The Handmaid's Tale that I've read Perhaps it is because she's been under the gun of late because of her intervention to use the horrid academese—anyone care to interrogate that? in those tempests in a teaspoon not in absolute terms to be sure but from an outsider's perspective perhaps—they were both uite the literary furors here in Canada easily bigger than anything else on our cultural horizon the Joseph Boyden cultural apropriation and Steven Galloway sexual harassment Affairs MA came to the defense of both authors and social media ate her for lunch So maybe I have a soft spot for underdogs as she currently feels like one to me in spite of the global mega success of the Hulu series based upon The Handmaid's Tale excellent BTWAs I said my admittedly limited acuaintance with her fiction did not stir me much but her poetry— that amazing voice of hers has always been something special and she brings that voice to this volume in a major way The first lecture Who Do You Think You Are? could have easily gone on at book length as far as I was concerned as her dry wit made the details of this her abridged writer's autobiography really sing for me And there seems to be much of the writer herself too in the second essay Duplicity where Atwood dives into the difference between the writing and the uotidian selves She starts to pull back away from taking any kind of stand in the next two essay lectures though The Great God Pen and Temptation where she lays out a variety of higher callings that the writer may serve Mammon Art for Art's Sake and Social Relevance it is just when you most want her to stake some kind of claim about literary value about the novel's conflicted contridictory relationship to the market and thus to its own birth and coming of age story the novel's own Künstlerroman that MA begins the process of removing herself from this book and with thereby contenting herself with merely laying out the various alternate routes that the writer and the novel could take without ever once returning as MA herself to tell us which route or combination thereof she took and why THAT was what I was hoping for in this book and receiving of it might have brought me back to her novels with renewed interest but alas she sits on the fence for the remainder of the series of lectures and though we are treated to a still interesting synopticon of the wide range and depth of her own reading for instance I should have guessed beforehand —but didn't—that she would love Borges yet who'da thunk that ol' DFW would get a look in and even Uncle Don Delillo for godsakes—gotta luv her to death for that we just don't see enough of what Margaret Atwood thinks on very much I'm afraidThus did I limp my way through the last two essays on the writer's relations with the reader and with the dead—the later being the most anticipated and least enjoyed by yours truly Oh I was hoping I guess to get a practicing writer's response to the importance of capital T Tradition—cf Harold Bloom's thesis about how to borrow from Marx the tradition of all dead generations weighs like a nightmare on the brains of the living But alas I closed the book with a sigh remembering the excitement of the first third of the book but feeling that much of it was really a missed opportunity for both of us writer and reader

  5. Linda Linda says:

    Margaret Atwood claims she is just a regular person but this book leaves no doubt about that claim She isn't Written in response to a reuest to be the Empson lecturer at the University of Cambridge a series of five lectures here worked into chapters explains how it is to be a writer One how that resonated with me was the writer as a creator and the writer as a person who does the laundry; the dishes and puts gas in the car She writes beautifully about the duality of this relationship She also writes about how painful it is to be the writer and meet the people who revere your writing Atwood who received her undergraduate degree from Victoria College at the University of Toronto and her master's degree from Radcliffe College has written a truly scholarly work in NEGOTIATING WITH THE DEAD The title refers to the the dead authors to whom we all owe so much and to our dead ancestors whose stories we are all compelled to tell one way or another References to legions of writers and literature is thankfully cited in ten pages of bibliography These citations are so successfully used in this work that we the reader want to read them in full Atwood's point of view is always en pointe which adds accessability to this for me formidable work A true treasure

  6. Britta Böhler Britta Böhler says:

    Interesting but at times a bit too 'fluffy' for my taste35 rounded down

  7. Nicky Nicky says:

    Margaret Atwood is I tentatively conclude not really the kind of writer I truly enjoy I can appreciate her work but I don't fall in love with it I'm not sure why altogether partially perhaps because I think I could pinpoint her as the author of something without knowing Her style gets between me and the narrativeHer style is apparent even in her non fiction book about writing It's a collection of connected essays The essays didn't feel particularly conclusive though Interesting yes and well written in terms of metaphor and uotations I love the classical references but I haven't come out of it with a true understanding of what Atwood believes about writing let alone with anything I can apply to my own writing

  8. Kate Savage Kate Savage says:

    I was reminded of something a medical student said to me about the interior of the human body forty years ago “It’s dark in there”Possibly then writing has to do with darkness and a desire or perhaps a compulsion to enter it and with luck to illuminate it and to bring something back out to the light This book is about that kind of darkness and that kind of desire AtwoodThe writers I love are the ones who say writing is an act of sinking emptiness the shock of the void and the pleasure of the shock Kafka Cixous Lispector Duras And Atwood sounds like them when she explains that the person whose name is on the book might be pleasant and mild it's just that they have a double a parasite in the brain she writes that the internal writer is something like a necrophiliac tape worm made of ink But Atwood isn't as far gone into the Dark Arts of Writing as the others after all she can keep her head above water enough to craft a functioning plot while the other names mentioned are wide eyed with the fishes That makes this book somewhere between the fruitfully insane and the uninspiringly helpful between Cixous' Three Steps on the Ladder of Writing and Bradbury's Zen in the Art of Writing and is probably The Answer for those who conclude that moderation is the key to most mysteriesFor instance Atwood considers the reason for writing Is it simply to write Art for Art's Sake? If so won’t you end up making the euivalent of verbal doilies for the gilded armchairs in the Palace of Art? But if instead you choose Social Relevance Will you end up on a panel discussion and if so is it the panel discussion in Hell? Her books testify to the importance of never uite solving this uestionRead this if you're a writer especially if you love that dizzying inward movement of reading writers writing about writing for readers

  9. Magda Magda says:

    Interesting treatise on writing from various perspectives the inherent duplicity of a writer's persona the relationship between the writer and the reader and most intriguingly the role of the writer as a mediator between this world and the Beyond hence the title of the book For someone like me who's in the writing a thesis while churning out essays 247 part of her life this book contained one particularly important piece of advice on writerly resilience Get back on the horse that threw you p xviii Ergo don't stop writing even if it sometimes leaves you heaving for breath on the ground for haven't we all been there? Either figuratively or literally or both

  10. Victoria Rose Victoria Rose says:

    35 Not as readable as her fiction but really absorbing for those who have an interest in the art of writing or being a writer although it often slips into philosophy when discussing ideas Tons and tons of references to literature and a really great insight into Atwood's mind My favourite essay was on the author as two dual personalities Sometimes I felt that I was not intelligent enough to really 'get' some of her thought processes though

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