Paperback ↠ Junebug Kindle Þ

Paperback ↠ Junebug Kindle Þ



10 thoughts on “Junebug

  1. JumbleofJargon JumbleofJargon says:

    Sometimes authors use a dystopian setting to highlight problems in our world today Thus I was shocked that this 112 page children book has a writing style and storytelling aspects that are superior to many of the thick YA novels I've read From page one I was astonished by 9 year old Junebug's imagination and the phenomenal way Alice Mead wields words Although Junebug's biggest issue does not involve a love interest or talking down a totalitarian government the matter of surviving in the projects with an Aunt who makes juvenile decisions and the inevitable gang invitation awaiting him as early as age 13 make a dystopian world sound cozyI'm reluctant to elaborate further on the challenges Junebug faces since the book is so brief and because I really really want you to read this I spent a couple summers at camps working with kids who live in the NYC projects not far from where I live that bear a striking resemblance to the projects Junebug lives in I feel like I understand those kids I looked after better I don't understand why books like these were not in my school library from pre k to 6th grade Looking back all I remember are having access to books with white characters who were never worried about money or any of the problems POC in my neighborhood face This is especially confounding since there were no white students at my at my K 8 school My school was comprised of Black American Guyanese Jamaican Trinidadian Bengali Indian and a few Latino students Often the students like me had parents who were immigrants or immigrated from the aforementioned locations themselves I was a bit of an oddball being the only person in my year with parents who immigrated from Africa but that's a long story for another timeI just hope kids have access to books they can see themselves in at their schools today


  2. John Jorgensen John Jorgensen says:

    I thought that this book was a good book to read It teaches you to always stay strong even through hard times and bad influencesplot Junebug is a young boy of the age of 9 He has a dream to collect mini bottles Although he has a hard childhood he tries his hardest to make the best of things even in the situations that he is in From gang affiliation to hard family matters Junebug doesn’t give up on his dream characterization Junebug is a young boy who is trying to fulfill his dream of collecting small glass bottles Tasha is Junebug’s sister She is just learning how to read and enjoys hanging out with her brother Setting and impact The setting is in a run down town where exact is unknown This story takes place in the past The setting had to be in a run down town because there are gangs involved and a lower view on life The book is in the past because the way that the story is being toldThematic connection The author’s message in this story is to always make the best of things No matter what bad things you may deal with if you have a dream follow the dream and make something of your lifeWho and why I would recommend this book to anyone looking to learn from the young If you are older than Junebug and reading this book you can learn from someone who is younger than you are


  3. Hannah Taylor Hannah Taylor says:

    Personal reaction I thought Junebug was kind of heartbreaking because of what Junebug had to deal with growing up in the projects I also thought it was heartwarming the way he decided to be strong and overcome obstacles to finally get his wish of learning about boatsPurpose I think this book would be especially good for individual reading of kids in the 3rd to 5th grade range because it shows how a young boy fights against the odds and doesn't end up a victim of the projects like most other boys when they turn 10 years old I believe it could give children that grow up in especially difficult neighborhoods where gangs and drugs run rampant the motivation to find a better life for themselves and show them it does not have to be that way I also like how it shows Junebug setting a goal and then actually taking steps to achieve it For example he wants to be a captain of a sailboat someday so he writes notes and puts them in jars so hopefully someone will see them While one could argue he is leaving a lot up to chance at least he is not being completely passive in achieving his goal


  4. Katie Katie says:

    This is a somber but heartwarming story of 9 year old Reeve McClain whose friends and family call him Junebug It is just before his 10th birthday and Junebug is busy filling empty glass bottles with his birthday wish which is to sail on a boat as he hopes one day to be a sea captain He’s also struggling with surviving in the projects of New Haven Connecticut where daily life is rough He is helping his little sister Tasha learn to read watches her after school when their aunt finds better things to do helps his mom with dinner and chores and dreams of a better life outside of the projects where there are no gangs and no violence The author actually spent time teaching art in this neighborhood


  5. Markita Harris Markita Harris says:

    I generally liked this book overall There are a lot of complexities in Junebugs life that are well reflected through Mead's writing However if you look at this book through a cultural lens it was very stereotypical and in some ways over generalized life in the projects I think it's a great book for students to read particularly when you are trying to examine stereotypes and why people join gangs


  6. Elizabeth Elizabeth says:

    Surprised the ratings for this book aren't higher Absolutely loved this story and I know my students will too


  7. Donna Barnes Donna Barnes says:

    This is another YA book that was recommended to me so I picked it up I enjoyed it Junebug is a tad younger in this book 10 years old and I point that out because I thought a slightly older kid might get out of it and I wasn't sure a twelve or thirteen year old kid would read about a 10 year old But I thought it just seemed a bit beyond a 10 year old in interest and in the style But I could be wrong here and not a good judge of that However I really thought this book had merit and interest and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it He's living in a very bad neighborhood and in not good circumstances since he's going to be 10 kids in the neighborhood want him to join a gang already He is worried about this birthday and he would much rather pursue his dream to collect enough bottles and put notes in each one asking people to support his interest in sailing away somewhere It's nice how that finishes off I liked this a lot Tons of dialogue Mostly dialogue so easy read for kids and it has a lot of action going on Warning it deals with a gun Junebug learns a lot about the problem with carrying guns and it's a good lesson in my opinion


  8. Hannah Hannah says:

    One of my students brought this book to me because he noticed a lot of similarities to “Dear Martin” by Nic Stone He read it back in 5th grade and wanted to see if I noticed similarities as well It definitely alludes to a lot of the same trials that Justyce goes through in “Dear Martin” and it makes me happy that these books have the ability to be in younger readers’ hands It is imperative to expose children to books of all kinds especially books that are diverse and cause its reader to think critically Junebug a boy is only 10 yet he experiences many trials that push him to mature much uicker than he needs to This is a great read and it makes me so happy that I have students who are connecting books recommending them to me


  9. Amy Amy says:

    Short but engaging tale of a young African American boy in the projects I would guess circa 1987 He is street smart and protects his kidergartener sister while his mom works long hours The description of the high rise project he lives in could allow kids a glimpse of a world they are unfamiliar with The boy's ability to watch and evaluate people around him as well as his own choices in life are life lessons to be shared with all


  10. Rachel Rachel says:

    This was a re read from my childhood I couldn't get rid of it when i was weeding last year because I remember loving it It was worth taking the time to read again just wish I thought my kids would like it


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Junebug ❰PDF / Epub❯ ★ Junebug Author Alice Mead – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Some of the stuff that goes on in the Auburn Street Projects I'm never gonna do These projects are like some kind of never never land like they never got put on a regular map Nobody comes around here Some of the stuff that goes on in the Auburn Street Projects I'm never gonna do These projects are like some kind of never never land like they never got put on a regular map Nobody comes around here on purpose It's as if we all got lost right in the middle of the cityReeve McClain Jr Junebug has decided to skip his birthday Since ten is the age when boys in the projects are forced to join gangs or are ensnared by drug dealers Junebug would rather remain nine Still he does have a birthday wish to someday become a ship's captain and sail away So Junebug comes up with a plan to launch a flotilla fifty glass bottles containing notes with his wish in the hope that someone somewhere will help to make his dream come true.

10 thoughts on “Junebug

  1. JumbleofJargon JumbleofJargon says:

    Sometimes authors use a dystopian setting to highlight problems in our world today Thus I was shocked that this 112 page children book has a writing style and storytelling aspects that are superior to many of the thick YA novels I've read From page one I was astonished by 9 year old Junebug's imagination and the phenomenal way Alice Mead wields words Although Junebug's biggest issue does not involve a love interest or talking down a totalitarian government the matter of surviving in the projects with an Aunt who makes juvenile decisions and the inevitable gang invitation awaiting him as early as age 13 make a dystopian world sound cozyI'm reluctant to elaborate further on the challenges Junebug faces since the book is so brief and because I really really want you to read this I spent a couple summers at camps working with kids who live in the NYC projects not far from where I live that bear a striking resemblance to the projects Junebug lives in I feel like I understand those kids I looked after better I don't understand why books like these were not in my school library from pre k to 6th grade Looking back all I remember are having access to books with white characters who were never worried about money or any of the problems POC in my neighborhood face This is especially confounding since there were no white students at my at my K 8 school My school was comprised of Black American Guyanese Jamaican Trinidadian Bengali Indian and a few Latino students Often the students like me had parents who were immigrants or immigrated from the aforementioned locations themselves I was a bit of an oddball being the only person in my year with parents who immigrated from Africa but that's a long story for another timeI just hope kids have access to books they can see themselves in at their schools today

  2. John Jorgensen John Jorgensen says:

    I thought that this book was a good book to read It teaches you to always stay strong even through hard times and bad influencesplot Junebug is a young boy of the age of 9 He has a dream to collect mini bottles Although he has a hard childhood he tries his hardest to make the best of things even in the situations that he is in From gang affiliation to hard family matters Junebug doesn’t give up on his dream characterization Junebug is a young boy who is trying to fulfill his dream of collecting small glass bottles Tasha is Junebug’s sister She is just learning how to read and enjoys hanging out with her brother Setting and impact The setting is in a run down town where exact is unknown This story takes place in the past The setting had to be in a run down town because there are gangs involved and a lower view on life The book is in the past because the way that the story is being toldThematic connection The author’s message in this story is to always make the best of things No matter what bad things you may deal with if you have a dream follow the dream and make something of your lifeWho and why I would recommend this book to anyone looking to learn from the young If you are older than Junebug and reading this book you can learn from someone who is younger than you are

  3. Hannah Taylor Hannah Taylor says:

    Personal reaction I thought Junebug was kind of heartbreaking because of what Junebug had to deal with growing up in the projects I also thought it was heartwarming the way he decided to be strong and overcome obstacles to finally get his wish of learning about boatsPurpose I think this book would be especially good for individual reading of kids in the 3rd to 5th grade range because it shows how a young boy fights against the odds and doesn't end up a victim of the projects like most other boys when they turn 10 years old I believe it could give children that grow up in especially difficult neighborhoods where gangs and drugs run rampant the motivation to find a better life for themselves and show them it does not have to be that way I also like how it shows Junebug setting a goal and then actually taking steps to achieve it For example he wants to be a captain of a sailboat someday so he writes notes and puts them in jars so hopefully someone will see them While one could argue he is leaving a lot up to chance at least he is not being completely passive in achieving his goal

  4. Katie Katie says:

    This is a somber but heartwarming story of 9 year old Reeve McClain whose friends and family call him Junebug It is just before his 10th birthday and Junebug is busy filling empty glass bottles with his birthday wish which is to sail on a boat as he hopes one day to be a sea captain He’s also struggling with surviving in the projects of New Haven Connecticut where daily life is rough He is helping his little sister Tasha learn to read watches her after school when their aunt finds better things to do helps his mom with dinner and chores and dreams of a better life outside of the projects where there are no gangs and no violence The author actually spent time teaching art in this neighborhood

  5. Markita Harris Markita Harris says:

    I generally liked this book overall There are a lot of complexities in Junebugs life that are well reflected through Mead's writing However if you look at this book through a cultural lens it was very stereotypical and in some ways over generalized life in the projects I think it's a great book for students to read particularly when you are trying to examine stereotypes and why people join gangs

  6. Elizabeth Elizabeth says:

    Surprised the ratings for this book aren't higher Absolutely loved this story and I know my students will too

  7. Donna Barnes Donna Barnes says:

    This is another YA book that was recommended to me so I picked it up I enjoyed it Junebug is a tad younger in this book 10 years old and I point that out because I thought a slightly older kid might get out of it and I wasn't sure a twelve or thirteen year old kid would read about a 10 year old But I thought it just seemed a bit beyond a 10 year old in interest and in the style But I could be wrong here and not a good judge of that However I really thought this book had merit and interest and I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it He's living in a very bad neighborhood and in not good circumstances since he's going to be 10 kids in the neighborhood want him to join a gang already He is worried about this birthday and he would much rather pursue his dream to collect enough bottles and put notes in each one asking people to support his interest in sailing away somewhere It's nice how that finishes off I liked this a lot Tons of dialogue Mostly dialogue so easy read for kids and it has a lot of action going on Warning it deals with a gun Junebug learns a lot about the problem with carrying guns and it's a good lesson in my opinion

  8. Hannah Hannah says:

    One of my students brought this book to me because he noticed a lot of similarities to “Dear Martin” by Nic Stone He read it back in 5th grade and wanted to see if I noticed similarities as well It definitely alludes to a lot of the same trials that Justyce goes through in “Dear Martin” and it makes me happy that these books have the ability to be in younger readers’ hands It is imperative to expose children to books of all kinds especially books that are diverse and cause its reader to think critically Junebug a boy is only 10 yet he experiences many trials that push him to mature much uicker than he needs to This is a great read and it makes me so happy that I have students who are connecting books recommending them to me

  9. Amy Amy says:

    Short but engaging tale of a young African American boy in the projects I would guess circa 1987 He is street smart and protects his kidergartener sister while his mom works long hours The description of the high rise project he lives in could allow kids a glimpse of a world they are unfamiliar with The boy's ability to watch and evaluate people around him as well as his own choices in life are life lessons to be shared with all

  10. Rachel Rachel says:

    This was a re read from my childhood I couldn't get rid of it when i was weeding last year because I remember loving it It was worth taking the time to read again just wish I thought my kids would like it

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *