Paperback ï Outlaw Epub Þ

Paperback ï Outlaw Epub Þ


Outlaw ☂ Outlaw PDF / Epub ✐ Author Angus Donald – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk MEET THE GODFATHER OF SHERWOOD FORESTWhen he s caught stealing, young Alan Dale is forced to leave his family and go to live with a notorious band of outlaws in Sherwood ForestTheir leader is the infa MEET THE GODFATHER OF SHERWOOD FORESTWhen he s caught stealing, young Alan Dale is forced to leave his family and go to live with a notorious band of Outlaws in Sherwood ForestTheir leader is the infamous Robin Hood A tough, bloodthirsty warrior, Robin is feared than any man in the country And he becomes a mentor for Alan with his fellow Outlaws, Robin teaches Alan how to fight and how to winBut Robin is a ruthless man and although he is Alan s protector, if Alan displeases him, he could also just as easily become his murderer.


10 thoughts on “Outlaw

  1. Duckie Duckie says:

    This is not the worst Robin Hood novel I ve ever read that would be Scarlet , but it is the worst by someone who was a professional author journalist before writing a novel The text is unintentionally hilarious, the characters have the emotional depth of tissue paper, and like a piss drunk Robin Hood at a county archery contest, Donald manages to miss the target entirely.Donald showers his text liberally with ill executed references to masculinity, such as We were on the road again at dawn This is not the worst Robin Hood novel I ve ever read that would be Scarlet , but it is the worst by someone who was a professional author journalist before writing a novel The text is unintentionally hilarious, the characters have the emotional depth of tissue paper, and like a piss drunk Robin Hood at a county archery contest, Donald manages to miss the target entirely.Donald showers his text liberally with ill executed references to masculinity, such as We were on the road again at dawn the next day, the motley cavalcade clattering out of the gates of the farm compoundas the cocks were bawling a noisy message about their masculinity to the heavens Yeah Because when I think of masculinity, I think of this Later on, when young Alan Dale is learning swordsmanship from his master he remarks, I d poke at him, the clumsy boy, he d give a manly guffaw, and skip lightly out of my path I applaud Donald s ability to write manly and skip in the same sentence with what was presumably a straight face.By the end of the novel, after countless lines like I found the company of perfumed ladies, day after day, a little stifling and often escaped to talk about manly military affairs with the Gascon guard, every time Donald mentioned Robin and his men I was picturing this MANLY.Donald also frequently feels the need to spell out the blatantly obvious When Alan Dale and Robin Hood discover a secret storehouse in the forest, Alan notes, For any bowman, it was a storehouse of riches Though it contained no silver, no gold or jewels, it did contain stack upon stack of the best quality arrows So after specifying that it was a storehouse of riches only for bowmen, Donald helpfully clarifies that this meant the storehouse contained no silver, gold or jewels Thanks, Donald, but surprisingly enough, I got that far on my own.Donald also doesn t seem to grasp how foreshadowing works Foreshadowing generally means you drop one or two lines, maybe at the end of a chapter, indicating that something terrible is about to happen Foreshadowing does not mean you write lines like And my laziness was to save my life Followed half a page later by W e might have kept the horror that was about to fall on us at bay Followed a page later by God be praised, that decision saved our lives Before you even begin to describe what the event is By that point I m not even mildly curious, I m just annoyed.The characters are a study in contradictions, and not in a good way The novel is told in flashback by Alan Dale, now in his sixties, regarding a period of his life in his early teens Alan s most memorable feature is that he thinks the status of his penis is the most interesting part of the story, and is constantly providing the reader with updates This is not unusual for Alan the thirteen to fifteen year old boy What s odd is that Alan the sixty something year old man telling the story still thinks his pubescent penis is the most interesting part of it One would think that after a lifetime spent as a storyteller and traveling minstrel, Alan would have grasped that a play by play of the state of his dick is not something his audience has much interest in.Alan the sixty year old man also repeatedly brags about the various pranks he pulled in his early teens, but it s unclear why this is since they re not particularly inventive and he s not that swift in coming up with them At one point when a boy seated next to him at dinner every night always steals food from his plate, it takes Alan several days to come up with the idea of putting something in the food that would make the boy regret stealing it This is literally the first thing most teenagers would think of, and it would probably take them less than five minutes.Other characters in the novel are littlethan one dimensional Alan describes the Sheriff as sibilant, whining, speaking with a lisp, and wearing lavender scented cologne Really, Donald, if you were going to go that direction, you could have just called him Pansy McLimpwrist and saved us all a block of pointless homophobic descriptions.Probably the oddest choice in characterization is Robin Hood himself, since he s barely in the novel He breezes in and out of Alan s life every year or two, he seems to enjoy violence as a sort of Godfather figure, andthat s it That s all we really know Which leaves me to wonder why bother writing a Robin Hood novel if you re barely going to put the character in There s a lot of violence in this novel, but most of it feels forced, as if Donald is trying to impress the readers with how very, very violent this world must be However, he chooses not to contrast it with the rise of rule of law during this time period, which is an interesting choice, I guess, since that s the whole point of the legend This is where Donald s aim is way off I don t think anyone is surprised anyby the knowledge that the Middle Ages were violent, and that lords were cruel to their peasants Which is why it would help to see this violence contrasted with some cognizance that the forest laws were unjust and constituted a breach of the feudal contract It s not the violence of the era that makes the legend notable, it s the idea that even kings and lords should accept limits to their greed in making laws that were fair to their peasants, because making laws that were unreasonably avaricious such as declaring peasants lands to be part of the king s game preserve, thus making them unavailable for farming was effectively sentencing the peasants to death by starvation Donald doesn t mention rule of law at all during the novel, however, except for Robin s speech at the very end where he throws in a reference to unjust laws Since Robin never addresses this topic previously, the reference seems really out of place, and out of character And ultimately, that s what made this novel not worth my time


  2. Andy Andy says:

    So its about Robin Hood you surmise Well not really as the tale centres on Alan Dale who is also the aged narrator of the book at the start We have his early life as a young thief in Nottingham who has to abscond to the forest after being caught facing losing his hand he is taken on by Robin Hood his band of outlaws For the most part its a coming of age story, which is sound as this youth is mature beyond his years so no its not a YA style read with lots of Teen angst H So its about Robin Hood you surmise Well not really as the tale centres on Alan Dale who is also the aged narrator of the book at the start We have his early life as a young thief in Nottingham who has to abscond to the forest after being caught facing losing his hand he is taken on by Robin Hood his band of outlaws For the most part its a coming of age story, which is sound as this youth is mature beyond his years so no its not a YA style read with lots of Teen angst He is surrounded by a gang of outlaws who arerough diamonds than savage beasts of whom many a name is known to us readers through lore.Each character is introduced in turn Robin Hood, Friar Tuck, Little John, Guy Gisbourne, Will Scarlet, Will Mutch, Maid Marion they re back history filled in for us through their contact with Alan who goes through various initiations training with the band of outlaws Its bloodthirsty for sure carries adds a pagan element to Robin s character which is interesting fits for someone who lives in the woods has a problem with the church Defo not the Errol Flynn version been told here quite an earthy, hardened, strong willed but fair man portrayed who treats loyalty well whereas treachery is punished harshly to keep his realm intact which is constantly under assault from the crown.It flows well for the most part is a tale which transports you back to the time capturing the feeling of the downtrodden unjustly treated by the Norman nobility who at this time are still portrayed as aggressive interlopers Its in part a coming of age story heavy on adventure finishes as Alan Dale makes his mark in the final chapters comes to manhood.A series I shall be riding on with a score in the high 3 s rounded upto 4 stars for me


  3. Mark Harrison Mark Harrison says:

    There is nothing subtle or clever here just a thunderous good adventure as Alan Dale hides with Robin Hood, John, Tuck and Marie Anne against all the evil doers of Nottingham Lots of battles, scandal and debauchary and huge piles of great fun Perfect antedote to somecerebral reads I have recently had Will be investing in the series.


  4. Julia Julia says:

    A friend gave this to me to read, so I gave it a go Truthfully, I wasn t impressed The book had very little new to offer, either to the Robin Hood mythology or in literary terms Reimagining Robin Hood as a Godfather like figure could have been interesting, but that potential was never realized The author s writing was, at best, basic, and there were times that he had me laughing with disbelief at his choice of descriptors For instance, Donald has the main character have a dream rife with ob A friend gave this to me to read, so I gave it a go Truthfully, I wasn t impressed The book had very little new to offer, either to the Robin Hood mythology or in literary terms Reimagining Robin Hood as a Godfather like figure could have been interesting, but that potential was never realized The author s writing was, at best, basic, and there were times that he had me laughing with disbelief at his choice of descriptors For instance, Donald has the main character have a dream rife with obvious pagan symbology, primarily about the triple figure of the Mother, and ends the description of the dream with, and I screamed, filled with a nameless masculine terror Seriously Nameless masculine terror That was a particularly shining example of Donald s writing style, but there were many, many others Anyway, the book veers between graphic descriptions of blood and gore, graphic descriptions of sexuality, and fairly obvious plot exposition scenes The graphic descriptions seem needless they seem to exist solely for the sake of being graphic It seemed to me that Donald was trying to come across as hard boiled and gritty with these descriptions, but instead came across as someone trying to come across as hard boiled and gritty He spenttime and effort describing a single gory moment than he does in describing any of his characters throughout the book It was off putting, frankly Further, we get our sense of the characters passively first one outlaw, then another, describes to our narrator main character passive listener why they re with Robin Hood, which basically boils down to, he s a bloody minded jerk, but for some reason I can t help but love him and would follow him into death We re never given any reason or opportunity to form our own opinion of Robin Hood he remains a cipher whose main attributes seem to be a silver eyes, b a lot of anger, and c a predilection for gore We re told that he s charismatic, compelling, fascinating, what have you, but nothing in the book gives substance to those assertions, save the fact that the assertions are being made All the characters are one dimensional, even those like Robin who are repeatedly stated to be complex, complicated individuals Perhaps if the author were a little less expository in his writing style, I might have believed there wereto the characters than met the eye Perhaps.All in all, I wouldn t recommend the book


  5. Graham Graham says:

    I m a big fan of Bernard Cornwell to say the least and knowing that the author of this was inspired by Bernard to write his own historical fictionwell, I had to check it out.I m delighted that I did OUTLAW is the beginning of a new series chronicling the adventures of Robin Hood, and it s a thrilling one Well researched, well written and well told, this is just the sort of historical adventure I love to read packed with action and intrigue and a memorable level of grittiness, too, this u I m a big fan of Bernard Cornwell to say the least and knowing that the author of this was inspired by Bernard to write his own historical fictionwell, I had to check it out.I m delighted that I did OUTLAW is the beginning of a new series chronicling the adventures of Robin Hood, and it s a thrilling one Well researched, well written and well told, this is just the sort of historical adventure I love to read packed with action and intrigue and a memorable level of grittiness, too, this unashamedly masculine yarn is polar opposites to the kind of feminine, genteel historical fiction written by the likes of Jean Plaidy and Philippa Gregory.The main thing to say about this book is that it s written to be enjoyed, rather than studied There s little depth here, nor does there need to be Vivid descriptions rule the page, and as a particular fan of the outlaws hiding out in the woods kind of story, I was in heaven Angus Donald brings his isolated locales to life, as well as showing the inside of a torture chamber and delivering some pretty unpleasant deaths and mutilations along the way A nice guy Robin ain t, yet his character feels authentic and you end up wanting to read the next book about him.There are only a couple of big action set pieces, but these don t disappoint There s a ghastly ambush in which the descriptions of death and slaughter are so real that you can almost smell the bloodshed, and a big battle finale that doesn t disappoint it s one of the best battle scenes I ve read in a while, and is up there with Cornwell himself More like this, please Donald is a new writer, so there are minor problems An interval at a pagan ceremony feels out of place and over the top, and there are some slow spots in the middle passages But these dwindle into insignificance alongside the many, varied highlights the wolf attack, for instance Be warned, this is one of the most explicit historical novels I ve read in its depiction of bloodshed, which gives it the gritty edge.All in all, this is a book I found very enjoyable, and I look forward to sitting down with the sequel


  6. Sam Sam says:

    Picked this up on a whim and how glad am I that I did Although the Robin Hood story has been told on countless occasions and in many ways, this is one of theoriginal versions to date Donald has managed to create a Robin that is believable and balances the hero character that we all know and love with therealistic criminal outlaw that he would ve been.The story is told through the eyes of Alan Dale, who ends up joining Robin s crew as a result of a single criminal act born from hung Picked this up on a whim and how glad am I that I did Although the Robin Hood story has been told on countless occasions and in many ways, this is one of theoriginal versions to date Donald has managed to create a Robin that is believable and balances the hero character that we all know and love with therealistic criminal outlaw that he would ve been.The story is told through the eyes of Alan Dale, who ends up joining Robin s crew as a result of a single criminal act born from hunger and nothingAs Alan becomesanda part of Robin s crew, we meet all the usual suspects of the Robin Hood tale from Little John to Maid Marian or Marie Anne as she is in this tale and of course Friar Tuck Donald has kept the familiar traits of each of the characters while building on them further and making them seem not onlyreal buthuman as well, with everyone having both good and bad sides.Donald has also recreated the atmosphere and hardships of life in 12th and 13th England during a time of political turmoil, long drawn out wars and the day to day battle against squalor and starvation Within this setting he portrays not only the importance of Robin s men for the everyday folk but also how his actions may have influenced those in higher stations, including the Knights Templar who make a subtle yet suitable appearance The battle scenes are vivid and dynamic and pull the reader right into the middle of the action and keeps you there until the very last sword stroke, while maintaining a sense of realism that other Hood tales occasionally lack Overall an exciting first installment and one that has got me looking forward to the next with great anticipation


  7. Mike (the Paladin) Mike (the Paladin) says:

    This is a sort of hummm, interesting.take on the Robin Hood legend The author takes some time afterward to discuss this and why he writes what he writes.This is a good book It s a somewhat new angle to take on the legendary character he sbitter in some ways definitely a disillusioned hero We get the childhood trauma card played here and the author wanted very badly to include a pagan take on the religion in the book.Here we are told the story by Alan Dale Alan a Dale as he This is a sort of hummm, interesting.take on the Robin Hood legend The author takes some time afterward to discuss this and why he writes what he writes.This is a good book It s a somewhat new angle to take on the legendary character he sbitter in some ways definitely a disillusioned hero We get the childhood trauma card played here and the author wanted very badly to include a pagan take on the religion in the book.Here we are told the story by Alan Dale Alan a Dale as he is forced to flee into the Green Wood and seek Robert Odo possibly based on Robert Fitzodo or Robin Hood There he meets Friar Tuck a Christian friar oddly helping the outlaws of Sherwood, Little John, Will Scaflock Scarlet and others He also meets Marianne for whom he s immediately smitten.Robin is not fond of The Church and just so you ll know he participates in some rather disturbing pagan rites This seems it may be a big part of the story as it goes along.Without spoilers I ll say that while Angus Donald tries to set his own story up and is actually trying toaccurately reflect King Richard and what went before it s still a very good story I can recommend this one pretty highly for pure story telling just be aware that if you like me have strong religious beliefs probably of any stripe you ll have to just look at this as a story and not get up tight about some of it.So, nice exciting take on the Robin Hood legend, good characters, good story telling I d say give this one a try.By the wayI plan to follow it up soon with the next book in the series


  8. Steve Justice Steve Justice says:

    Outlaw describes itself as a gripping, action packed historical thriller that delves deep into the fascinating legend of Robin Hood Outlaw is none of these things and somehow succeeds in turning the fascinating legend of Robin Hood into a worse than average piece of confusing half ideas and shallow characters Firstly the main description of the novel is totally misleading historical thriller Outlaw is not historical as there is still no proof of Robin Hood s existence, and it is not Outlaw describes itself as a gripping, action packed historical thriller that delves deep into the fascinating legend of Robin Hood Outlaw is none of these things and somehow succeeds in turning the fascinating legend of Robin Hood into a worse than average piece of confusing half ideas and shallow characters Firstly the main description of the novel is totally misleading historical thriller Outlaw is not historical as there is still no proof of Robin Hood s existence, and it is not a thriller in any shape or form There are few moments of suspense or surprise and the one supposed twist at the end is predictable and over explained While I m at it, it is not gripping or action packed either So enough of dissecting the description on the back of the book Outlaw s bold subtitle is Meet the Godfather of Sherwood Forest This stems from Donald s creation of Robin Hood as a darker figure, collecting tribute from the inhabitants of the forest in exchange for his protection The idea of making Robin Hoodlike a real criminal is a good one too often the whole rob from the rich and give to the poor idea has painted Robin Hood as a blond charmer who never hurt an innocent fly, lifting bags of gold from the villainous Sheriff of Nottingham while his Band of Merry Men sing songs and drink wine I would love to see a deeper, darker portrayal of this legendary figure Unfortunately, Angus Donald s Robin Hood is a bland shadow of a character and I don t mean that in any positive, dark way Donald seems to have forgotten rule number one of Creative Writing 101 Show, don t tell The protagonist, another confusing character called Alan Dale, is forced to join Robin s band of outlaws following a theft gone wrong We see Robin Hood through his eyes, sometimes adoringly, sometimes fearfully, but we never really see Robin Hood do anything Alan says he is charming or Alan says he is scary, but Robin Hood himself, when he makes an appearance, is just boring He sits He broods He looks tired He looks charming Alan constantly talks about how what made Robin Hood unique was his ability to charm people even after committing horrific acts, but again we never see this Just Alan talking about it Donald tries to paint Robin mischievous, constantly giving winks in serious situations and laughing heartily on thefts, which is completely at odds with the original idea of him being a Godfather Alan Dale is also a mess of a character, swapping randomly between whimpering child and ferocious warrior Further the flash forwards to Dale as an old man looking back on these adventures are completely unnecessary and break up the action Alan s love for Marie Anne switches on and off like a light switch and his proclamation at the end that his love islike that for a sister is absurd considering they spent only a matter of hours in each others company To sum up, before this becomesof a rant than a review, the characters are ridiculous and contrary, the story is predictable and clich d, the premise is good but completely ignored a quarter in and the action scenes, few and far between as they are, aren t particularly interesting either There are dozens of great historical novels out there, many of them written by independently published authors Do them and yourself a favour save your money on this and buy a few indie books instead


  9. Natalie Natalie says:

    Nearly a four, really Good enough that I m going to read Holy Warrior, the next one in the series, as an e book just so I don t have to wait a whole day or two to follow Robin Hood and Alan A Dale on the crusades Why is it nearly a fourpeople defecate They urinate They get sick These three are a must for me in historical fiction there s a reasonWhere do you go to the bathroomis the question astronauts get the most If you want to see the astronauts solution watch this nation Nearly a four, really Good enough that I m going to read Holy Warrior, the next one in the series, as an e book just so I don t have to wait a whole day or two to follow Robin Hood and Alan A Dale on the crusades Why is it nearly a fourpeople defecate They urinate They get sick These three are a must for me in historical fiction there s a reasonWhere do you go to the bathroomis the question astronauts get the most If you want to see the astronauts solution watch this national geographic space potty training device video.If you want to step back into the England of the 12 13th centuries, then there s no better narrator for the journey than Alan A Dale Why isn t it quite a fourit s about an exciting time and exciting things happen but somehow it isn t a big time page turner, it s acasual read than that What makes me want to keep reading anyway The narrative voice of the character, Alan A Dale is quite natural and comfortable to listen to If you ve read this far in my review, I have an Alan A Dale tidbit for you Sort of in between songs during Live at the Riverboat 1969 on a track recorded as Important Song D Minor Allen A Dale Neil says Allen A Dale is a better guitarist than Eric Clapton Here s Neil talking to the crowd about Allen A Dale Neil Young sincerely, almost questioning the audience I learned this song from Allen A DaleCrowd giggles.Neil Young Alright Neil Young as an aside and, ah, what an awful thing to do right on stage Neil Youngemphatically Anyway, You know who Allen A Dale is, don t you Doesn t anybody know about him You know who Allen A Dale IS You don t Somebody doesn t He s a guitar player from England And he ah, He lived a long time ago He s probably one of the greatest musicians ever to come out of England Although he d never gone anywhere because they didn t have planes or anything back then He had to hang around a forest plays a beautiful little riff Well, I don t know, I was going to talk about him, but you don t sound too interested I have a whole long thing about him plays abeautiful music. No I made a study of him actually Continues to play, louder. He s better than Clapton plays stronger stillNeil Young says something unintelligible continues playing stronglyWell anyway


  10. Terri Terri says:

    This book may be a lot of people s cup of tea, but it was not mine I quite enjoyed the start, up until approx page 60 It went down from there for me though I think there was some irreparable damage done for me with an early feast scene which included description that seemedabout the author living out fantasy than about importance to story I was still okay with the book though and carried on despite my misgivings This was the authors first book, so I expected some ups and downs But th This book may be a lot of people s cup of tea, but it was not mine I quite enjoyed the start, up until approx page 60 It went down from there for me though I think there was some irreparable damage done for me with an early feast scene which included description that seemedabout the author living out fantasy than about importance to story I was still okay with the book though and carried on despite my misgivings This was the authors first book, so I expected some ups and downs But the biggest damage came with a sex scene I am not a fan of the sex scene in books I find most of them are there for either the author to live out his or her own fantasies, or to heat up the story If that is what they are there for, then I am not interested If they are there because they are important to the character s story and they are done with class, then I can accept them But this sex scene was probably the worst I have ever read in an historical fiction Do the wordshot jets of men s essencedo anything for you They do not do anything for me, but I am sure this sex scene would feel at home in Penthouse magazine letters of the week Shaft and prick rated ample mention, and I felt when I was skimming over these scenes that hot meat injection was only around the corner.It was extremely difficult for me to come back from that scene I can understand him wanting a sex scene there, but it was the way it was written that was appalling The book had lost my respect and I rarely recover when that happens.As for the rest of the bookit had it s moments where it was enjoyable It read like Young Adult to me however I do not mean that as an insult It was simple storytelling told by a child protagonist in a child s words I think it was clever marketing A Young Adult book marketed as an Adult Fiction with a Young Adult cover Genius It taps into the teenage market as well as the adult historical action adventure reader I was once told that Outlaw wasYoung Adult than adult fiction, but then so many people told me it was not I would agree with the first person, who told me it was YA as this book seemed very much written for the teenage boy or the teenage boy at heart.I expect once Alan grows up in the series and the author hones his skill, that the series will improve


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10 thoughts on “Outlaw

  1. Duckie Duckie says:

    This is not the worst Robin Hood novel I ve ever read that would be Scarlet , but it is the worst by someone who was a professional author journalist before writing a novel The text is unintentionally hilarious, the characters have the emotional depth of tissue paper, and like a piss drunk Robin Hood at a county archery contest, Donald manages to miss the target entirely.Donald showers his text liberally with ill executed references to masculinity, such as We were on the road again at dawn This is not the worst Robin Hood novel I ve ever read that would be Scarlet , but it is the worst by someone who was a professional author journalist before writing a novel The text is unintentionally hilarious, the characters have the emotional depth of tissue paper, and like a piss drunk Robin Hood at a county archery contest, Donald manages to miss the target entirely.Donald showers his text liberally with ill executed references to masculinity, such as We were on the road again at dawn the next day, the motley cavalcade clattering out of the gates of the farm compoundas the cocks were bawling a noisy message about their masculinity to the heavens Yeah Because when I think of masculinity, I think of this Later on, when young Alan Dale is learning swordsmanship from his master he remarks, I d poke at him, the clumsy boy, he d give a manly guffaw, and skip lightly out of my path I applaud Donald s ability to write manly and skip in the same sentence with what was presumably a straight face.By the end of the novel, after countless lines like I found the company of perfumed ladies, day after day, a little stifling and often escaped to talk about manly military affairs with the Gascon guard, every time Donald mentioned Robin and his men I was picturing this MANLY.Donald also frequently feels the need to spell out the blatantly obvious When Alan Dale and Robin Hood discover a secret storehouse in the forest, Alan notes, For any bowman, it was a storehouse of riches Though it contained no silver, no gold or jewels, it did contain stack upon stack of the best quality arrows So after specifying that it was a storehouse of riches only for bowmen, Donald helpfully clarifies that this meant the storehouse contained no silver, gold or jewels Thanks, Donald, but surprisingly enough, I got that far on my own.Donald also doesn t seem to grasp how foreshadowing works Foreshadowing generally means you drop one or two lines, maybe at the end of a chapter, indicating that something terrible is about to happen Foreshadowing does not mean you write lines like And my laziness was to save my life Followed half a page later by W e might have kept the horror that was about to fall on us at bay Followed a page later by God be praised, that decision saved our lives Before you even begin to describe what the event is By that point I m not even mildly curious, I m just annoyed.The characters are a study in contradictions, and not in a good way The novel is told in flashback by Alan Dale, now in his sixties, regarding a period of his life in his early teens Alan s most memorable feature is that he thinks the status of his penis is the most interesting part of the story, and is constantly providing the reader with updates This is not unusual for Alan the thirteen to fifteen year old boy What s odd is that Alan the sixty something year old man telling the story still thinks his pubescent penis is the most interesting part of it One would think that after a lifetime spent as a storyteller and traveling minstrel, Alan would have grasped that a play by play of the state of his dick is not something his audience has much interest in.Alan the sixty year old man also repeatedly brags about the various pranks he pulled in his early teens, but it s unclear why this is since they re not particularly inventive and he s not that swift in coming up with them At one point when a boy seated next to him at dinner every night always steals food from his plate, it takes Alan several days to come up with the idea of putting something in the food that would make the boy regret stealing it This is literally the first thing most teenagers would think of, and it would probably take them less than five minutes.Other characters in the novel are littlethan one dimensional Alan describes the Sheriff as sibilant, whining, speaking with a lisp, and wearing lavender scented cologne Really, Donald, if you were going to go that direction, you could have just called him Pansy McLimpwrist and saved us all a block of pointless homophobic descriptions.Probably the oddest choice in characterization is Robin Hood himself, since he s barely in the novel He breezes in and out of Alan s life every year or two, he seems to enjoy violence as a sort of Godfather figure, andthat s it That s all we really know Which leaves me to wonder why bother writing a Robin Hood novel if you re barely going to put the character in There s a lot of violence in this novel, but most of it feels forced, as if Donald is trying to impress the readers with how very, very violent this world must be However, he chooses not to contrast it with the rise of rule of law during this time period, which is an interesting choice, I guess, since that s the whole point of the legend This is where Donald s aim is way off I don t think anyone is surprised anyby the knowledge that the Middle Ages were violent, and that lords were cruel to their peasants Which is why it would help to see this violence contrasted with some cognizance that the forest laws were unjust and constituted a breach of the feudal contract It s not the violence of the era that makes the legend notable, it s the idea that even kings and lords should accept limits to their greed in making laws that were fair to their peasants, because making laws that were unreasonably avaricious such as declaring peasants lands to be part of the king s game preserve, thus making them unavailable for farming was effectively sentencing the peasants to death by starvation Donald doesn t mention rule of law at all during the novel, however, except for Robin s speech at the very end where he throws in a reference to unjust laws Since Robin never addresses this topic previously, the reference seems really out of place, and out of character And ultimately, that s what made this novel not worth my time

  2. Andy Andy says:

    So its about Robin Hood you surmise Well not really as the tale centres on Alan Dale who is also the aged narrator of the book at the start We have his early life as a young thief in Nottingham who has to abscond to the forest after being caught facing losing his hand he is taken on by Robin Hood his band of outlaws For the most part its a coming of age story, which is sound as this youth is mature beyond his years so no its not a YA style read with lots of Teen angst H So its about Robin Hood you surmise Well not really as the tale centres on Alan Dale who is also the aged narrator of the book at the start We have his early life as a young thief in Nottingham who has to abscond to the forest after being caught facing losing his hand he is taken on by Robin Hood his band of outlaws For the most part its a coming of age story, which is sound as this youth is mature beyond his years so no its not a YA style read with lots of Teen angst He is surrounded by a gang of outlaws who arerough diamonds than savage beasts of whom many a name is known to us readers through lore.Each character is introduced in turn Robin Hood, Friar Tuck, Little John, Guy Gisbourne, Will Scarlet, Will Mutch, Maid Marion they re back history filled in for us through their contact with Alan who goes through various initiations training with the band of outlaws Its bloodthirsty for sure carries adds a pagan element to Robin s character which is interesting fits for someone who lives in the woods has a problem with the church Defo not the Errol Flynn version been told here quite an earthy, hardened, strong willed but fair man portrayed who treats loyalty well whereas treachery is punished harshly to keep his realm intact which is constantly under assault from the crown.It flows well for the most part is a tale which transports you back to the time capturing the feeling of the downtrodden unjustly treated by the Norman nobility who at this time are still portrayed as aggressive interlopers Its in part a coming of age story heavy on adventure finishes as Alan Dale makes his mark in the final chapters comes to manhood.A series I shall be riding on with a score in the high 3 s rounded upto 4 stars for me

  3. Mark Harrison Mark Harrison says:

    There is nothing subtle or clever here just a thunderous good adventure as Alan Dale hides with Robin Hood, John, Tuck and Marie Anne against all the evil doers of Nottingham Lots of battles, scandal and debauchary and huge piles of great fun Perfect antedote to somecerebral reads I have recently had Will be investing in the series.

  4. Julia Julia says:

    A friend gave this to me to read, so I gave it a go Truthfully, I wasn t impressed The book had very little new to offer, either to the Robin Hood mythology or in literary terms Reimagining Robin Hood as a Godfather like figure could have been interesting, but that potential was never realized The author s writing was, at best, basic, and there were times that he had me laughing with disbelief at his choice of descriptors For instance, Donald has the main character have a dream rife with ob A friend gave this to me to read, so I gave it a go Truthfully, I wasn t impressed The book had very little new to offer, either to the Robin Hood mythology or in literary terms Reimagining Robin Hood as a Godfather like figure could have been interesting, but that potential was never realized The author s writing was, at best, basic, and there were times that he had me laughing with disbelief at his choice of descriptors For instance, Donald has the main character have a dream rife with obvious pagan symbology, primarily about the triple figure of the Mother, and ends the description of the dream with, and I screamed, filled with a nameless masculine terror Seriously Nameless masculine terror That was a particularly shining example of Donald s writing style, but there were many, many others Anyway, the book veers between graphic descriptions of blood and gore, graphic descriptions of sexuality, and fairly obvious plot exposition scenes The graphic descriptions seem needless they seem to exist solely for the sake of being graphic It seemed to me that Donald was trying to come across as hard boiled and gritty with these descriptions, but instead came across as someone trying to come across as hard boiled and gritty He spenttime and effort describing a single gory moment than he does in describing any of his characters throughout the book It was off putting, frankly Further, we get our sense of the characters passively first one outlaw, then another, describes to our narrator main character passive listener why they re with Robin Hood, which basically boils down to, he s a bloody minded jerk, but for some reason I can t help but love him and would follow him into death We re never given any reason or opportunity to form our own opinion of Robin Hood he remains a cipher whose main attributes seem to be a silver eyes, b a lot of anger, and c a predilection for gore We re told that he s charismatic, compelling, fascinating, what have you, but nothing in the book gives substance to those assertions, save the fact that the assertions are being made All the characters are one dimensional, even those like Robin who are repeatedly stated to be complex, complicated individuals Perhaps if the author were a little less expository in his writing style, I might have believed there wereto the characters than met the eye Perhaps.All in all, I wouldn t recommend the book

  5. Graham Graham says:

    I m a big fan of Bernard Cornwell to say the least and knowing that the author of this was inspired by Bernard to write his own historical fictionwell, I had to check it out.I m delighted that I did OUTLAW is the beginning of a new series chronicling the adventures of Robin Hood, and it s a thrilling one Well researched, well written and well told, this is just the sort of historical adventure I love to read packed with action and intrigue and a memorable level of grittiness, too, this u I m a big fan of Bernard Cornwell to say the least and knowing that the author of this was inspired by Bernard to write his own historical fictionwell, I had to check it out.I m delighted that I did OUTLAW is the beginning of a new series chronicling the adventures of Robin Hood, and it s a thrilling one Well researched, well written and well told, this is just the sort of historical adventure I love to read packed with action and intrigue and a memorable level of grittiness, too, this unashamedly masculine yarn is polar opposites to the kind of feminine, genteel historical fiction written by the likes of Jean Plaidy and Philippa Gregory.The main thing to say about this book is that it s written to be enjoyed, rather than studied There s little depth here, nor does there need to be Vivid descriptions rule the page, and as a particular fan of the outlaws hiding out in the woods kind of story, I was in heaven Angus Donald brings his isolated locales to life, as well as showing the inside of a torture chamber and delivering some pretty unpleasant deaths and mutilations along the way A nice guy Robin ain t, yet his character feels authentic and you end up wanting to read the next book about him.There are only a couple of big action set pieces, but these don t disappoint There s a ghastly ambush in which the descriptions of death and slaughter are so real that you can almost smell the bloodshed, and a big battle finale that doesn t disappoint it s one of the best battle scenes I ve read in a while, and is up there with Cornwell himself More like this, please Donald is a new writer, so there are minor problems An interval at a pagan ceremony feels out of place and over the top, and there are some slow spots in the middle passages But these dwindle into insignificance alongside the many, varied highlights the wolf attack, for instance Be warned, this is one of the most explicit historical novels I ve read in its depiction of bloodshed, which gives it the gritty edge.All in all, this is a book I found very enjoyable, and I look forward to sitting down with the sequel

  6. Sam Sam says:

    Picked this up on a whim and how glad am I that I did Although the Robin Hood story has been told on countless occasions and in many ways, this is one of theoriginal versions to date Donald has managed to create a Robin that is believable and balances the hero character that we all know and love with therealistic criminal outlaw that he would ve been.The story is told through the eyes of Alan Dale, who ends up joining Robin s crew as a result of a single criminal act born from hung Picked this up on a whim and how glad am I that I did Although the Robin Hood story has been told on countless occasions and in many ways, this is one of theoriginal versions to date Donald has managed to create a Robin that is believable and balances the hero character that we all know and love with therealistic criminal outlaw that he would ve been.The story is told through the eyes of Alan Dale, who ends up joining Robin s crew as a result of a single criminal act born from hunger and nothingAs Alan becomesanda part of Robin s crew, we meet all the usual suspects of the Robin Hood tale from Little John to Maid Marian or Marie Anne as she is in this tale and of course Friar Tuck Donald has kept the familiar traits of each of the characters while building on them further and making them seem not onlyreal buthuman as well, with everyone having both good and bad sides.Donald has also recreated the atmosphere and hardships of life in 12th and 13th England during a time of political turmoil, long drawn out wars and the day to day battle against squalor and starvation Within this setting he portrays not only the importance of Robin s men for the everyday folk but also how his actions may have influenced those in higher stations, including the Knights Templar who make a subtle yet suitable appearance The battle scenes are vivid and dynamic and pull the reader right into the middle of the action and keeps you there until the very last sword stroke, while maintaining a sense of realism that other Hood tales occasionally lack Overall an exciting first installment and one that has got me looking forward to the next with great anticipation

  7. Mike (the Paladin) Mike (the Paladin) says:

    This is a sort of hummm, interesting.take on the Robin Hood legend The author takes some time afterward to discuss this and why he writes what he writes.This is a good book It s a somewhat new angle to take on the legendary character he sbitter in some ways definitely a disillusioned hero We get the childhood trauma card played here and the author wanted very badly to include a pagan take on the religion in the book.Here we are told the story by Alan Dale Alan a Dale as he This is a sort of hummm, interesting.take on the Robin Hood legend The author takes some time afterward to discuss this and why he writes what he writes.This is a good book It s a somewhat new angle to take on the legendary character he sbitter in some ways definitely a disillusioned hero We get the childhood trauma card played here and the author wanted very badly to include a pagan take on the religion in the book.Here we are told the story by Alan Dale Alan a Dale as he is forced to flee into the Green Wood and seek Robert Odo possibly based on Robert Fitzodo or Robin Hood There he meets Friar Tuck a Christian friar oddly helping the outlaws of Sherwood, Little John, Will Scaflock Scarlet and others He also meets Marianne for whom he s immediately smitten.Robin is not fond of The Church and just so you ll know he participates in some rather disturbing pagan rites This seems it may be a big part of the story as it goes along.Without spoilers I ll say that while Angus Donald tries to set his own story up and is actually trying toaccurately reflect King Richard and what went before it s still a very good story I can recommend this one pretty highly for pure story telling just be aware that if you like me have strong religious beliefs probably of any stripe you ll have to just look at this as a story and not get up tight about some of it.So, nice exciting take on the Robin Hood legend, good characters, good story telling I d say give this one a try.By the wayI plan to follow it up soon with the next book in the series

  8. Steve Justice Steve Justice says:

    Outlaw describes itself as a gripping, action packed historical thriller that delves deep into the fascinating legend of Robin Hood Outlaw is none of these things and somehow succeeds in turning the fascinating legend of Robin Hood into a worse than average piece of confusing half ideas and shallow characters Firstly the main description of the novel is totally misleading historical thriller Outlaw is not historical as there is still no proof of Robin Hood s existence, and it is not Outlaw describes itself as a gripping, action packed historical thriller that delves deep into the fascinating legend of Robin Hood Outlaw is none of these things and somehow succeeds in turning the fascinating legend of Robin Hood into a worse than average piece of confusing half ideas and shallow characters Firstly the main description of the novel is totally misleading historical thriller Outlaw is not historical as there is still no proof of Robin Hood s existence, and it is not a thriller in any shape or form There are few moments of suspense or surprise and the one supposed twist at the end is predictable and over explained While I m at it, it is not gripping or action packed either So enough of dissecting the description on the back of the book Outlaw s bold subtitle is Meet the Godfather of Sherwood Forest This stems from Donald s creation of Robin Hood as a darker figure, collecting tribute from the inhabitants of the forest in exchange for his protection The idea of making Robin Hoodlike a real criminal is a good one too often the whole rob from the rich and give to the poor idea has painted Robin Hood as a blond charmer who never hurt an innocent fly, lifting bags of gold from the villainous Sheriff of Nottingham while his Band of Merry Men sing songs and drink wine I would love to see a deeper, darker portrayal of this legendary figure Unfortunately, Angus Donald s Robin Hood is a bland shadow of a character and I don t mean that in any positive, dark way Donald seems to have forgotten rule number one of Creative Writing 101 Show, don t tell The protagonist, another confusing character called Alan Dale, is forced to join Robin s band of outlaws following a theft gone wrong We see Robin Hood through his eyes, sometimes adoringly, sometimes fearfully, but we never really see Robin Hood do anything Alan says he is charming or Alan says he is scary, but Robin Hood himself, when he makes an appearance, is just boring He sits He broods He looks tired He looks charming Alan constantly talks about how what made Robin Hood unique was his ability to charm people even after committing horrific acts, but again we never see this Just Alan talking about it Donald tries to paint Robin mischievous, constantly giving winks in serious situations and laughing heartily on thefts, which is completely at odds with the original idea of him being a Godfather Alan Dale is also a mess of a character, swapping randomly between whimpering child and ferocious warrior Further the flash forwards to Dale as an old man looking back on these adventures are completely unnecessary and break up the action Alan s love for Marie Anne switches on and off like a light switch and his proclamation at the end that his love islike that for a sister is absurd considering they spent only a matter of hours in each others company To sum up, before this becomesof a rant than a review, the characters are ridiculous and contrary, the story is predictable and clich d, the premise is good but completely ignored a quarter in and the action scenes, few and far between as they are, aren t particularly interesting either There are dozens of great historical novels out there, many of them written by independently published authors Do them and yourself a favour save your money on this and buy a few indie books instead

  9. Natalie Natalie says:

    Nearly a four, really Good enough that I m going to read Holy Warrior, the next one in the series, as an e book just so I don t have to wait a whole day or two to follow Robin Hood and Alan A Dale on the crusades Why is it nearly a fourpeople defecate They urinate They get sick These three are a must for me in historical fiction there s a reasonWhere do you go to the bathroomis the question astronauts get the most If you want to see the astronauts solution watch this nation Nearly a four, really Good enough that I m going to read Holy Warrior, the next one in the series, as an e book just so I don t have to wait a whole day or two to follow Robin Hood and Alan A Dale on the crusades Why is it nearly a fourpeople defecate They urinate They get sick These three are a must for me in historical fiction there s a reasonWhere do you go to the bathroomis the question astronauts get the most If you want to see the astronauts solution watch this national geographic space potty training device video.If you want to step back into the England of the 12 13th centuries, then there s no better narrator for the journey than Alan A Dale Why isn t it quite a fourit s about an exciting time and exciting things happen but somehow it isn t a big time page turner, it s acasual read than that What makes me want to keep reading anyway The narrative voice of the character, Alan A Dale is quite natural and comfortable to listen to If you ve read this far in my review, I have an Alan A Dale tidbit for you Sort of in between songs during Live at the Riverboat 1969 on a track recorded as Important Song D Minor Allen A Dale Neil says Allen A Dale is a better guitarist than Eric Clapton Here s Neil talking to the crowd about Allen A Dale Neil Young sincerely, almost questioning the audience I learned this song from Allen A DaleCrowd giggles.Neil Young Alright Neil Young as an aside and, ah, what an awful thing to do right on stage Neil Youngemphatically Anyway, You know who Allen A Dale is, don t you Doesn t anybody know about him You know who Allen A Dale IS You don t Somebody doesn t He s a guitar player from England And he ah, He lived a long time ago He s probably one of the greatest musicians ever to come out of England Although he d never gone anywhere because they didn t have planes or anything back then He had to hang around a forest plays a beautiful little riff Well, I don t know, I was going to talk about him, but you don t sound too interested I have a whole long thing about him plays abeautiful music. No I made a study of him actually Continues to play, louder. He s better than Clapton plays stronger stillNeil Young says something unintelligible continues playing stronglyWell anyway

  10. Terri Terri says:

    This book may be a lot of people s cup of tea, but it was not mine I quite enjoyed the start, up until approx page 60 It went down from there for me though I think there was some irreparable damage done for me with an early feast scene which included description that seemedabout the author living out fantasy than about importance to story I was still okay with the book though and carried on despite my misgivings This was the authors first book, so I expected some ups and downs But th This book may be a lot of people s cup of tea, but it was not mine I quite enjoyed the start, up until approx page 60 It went down from there for me though I think there was some irreparable damage done for me with an early feast scene which included description that seemedabout the author living out fantasy than about importance to story I was still okay with the book though and carried on despite my misgivings This was the authors first book, so I expected some ups and downs But the biggest damage came with a sex scene I am not a fan of the sex scene in books I find most of them are there for either the author to live out his or her own fantasies, or to heat up the story If that is what they are there for, then I am not interested If they are there because they are important to the character s story and they are done with class, then I can accept them But this sex scene was probably the worst I have ever read in an historical fiction Do the wordshot jets of men s essencedo anything for you They do not do anything for me, but I am sure this sex scene would feel at home in Penthouse magazine letters of the week Shaft and prick rated ample mention, and I felt when I was skimming over these scenes that hot meat injection was only around the corner.It was extremely difficult for me to come back from that scene I can understand him wanting a sex scene there, but it was the way it was written that was appalling The book had lost my respect and I rarely recover when that happens.As for the rest of the bookit had it s moments where it was enjoyable It read like Young Adult to me however I do not mean that as an insult It was simple storytelling told by a child protagonist in a child s words I think it was clever marketing A Young Adult book marketed as an Adult Fiction with a Young Adult cover Genius It taps into the teenage market as well as the adult historical action adventure reader I was once told that Outlaw wasYoung Adult than adult fiction, but then so many people told me it was not I would agree with the first person, who told me it was YA as this book seemed very much written for the teenage boy or the teenage boy at heart.I expect once Alan grows up in the series and the author hones his skill, that the series will improve

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