Blueprint for Disaster: The Unraveling of Chicago Public

Blueprint for Disaster: The Unraveling of Chicago Public


Blueprint for Disaster: The Unraveling of Chicago Public Housing [Download] ✤ Blueprint for Disaster: The Unraveling of Chicago Public Housing By D. Bradford Hunt – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Now considered a dysfunctional mess Chicago’s public housing projects once had long waiting lists of would be residents hoping to leave the slums behind So what went wrong To answer this complicated Now Disaster: The Unraveling of PDF or considered a dysfunctional mess Chicago’s public housing Disaster: The PDF/EPUB ç projects once had long waiting lists of would be residents hoping to leave the slums behind So what went wrong To answer this complicated uestion D Bradford Hunt Blueprint for Epub / traces public housing’s history in Chicago from its New Deal roots through current mayor Richard M Daley’s Plan for Transformation In the process he chronicles the Chicago Housing Authority’s own transformation from the city’s most progressive government for Disaster: The PDF ☆ agency to its largest slumlordChallenging explanations that attribute the projects’ decline primarily to for Disaster: The Unraveling of MOBI :Þ racial discrimination and real estate interests Hunt argues that well intentioned but misguided policy decisions—ranging from design choices to maintenance contracts—also paved the road for Disaster: The Unraveling of MOBI :Þ to failure Moreover administrators who fully understood the potential drawbacks did not try to halt such deeply flawed projects as Cabrini Green and the Robert Taylor Homes These massive high rise complexes housed unprecedented numbers of children but relatively few adults engendering disorder that pushed out the working class and conseuently the rents needed to maintain the buildings The resulting combination of fiscal crisis managerial incompetence and social unrest plunged the CHA into a uagmire from which it is still struggling to emerge Blueprint for Disaster then is an urgent reminder of the havoc poorly conceived policy can wreak on our most vulnerable citizens.


10 thoughts on “Blueprint for Disaster: The Unraveling of Chicago Public Housing

  1. Patreisha Patreisha says:

    When I attended Roosevelt University in Chicago in 2008 I had the pleasure of taking Dr Hunt's sociology course Contemporary Urban Issues In addition to learning about urban decal and renewal Dr Hunt gave profound insight and details into the atrocities surrounding public housing in Chicagoland What really stuck with me is the mandatory class field trip where my classmates and I visited several public housing sites in Chicago Seeing the mass devastation that uickly permeated housing geared for the poor Dr Hunt not only discussed the policies that failed to help the poor yet he also lectured on the architecture and architects of the time that where eually at fault for the demise of social housing If anyone has a chance to attend one of his lectures or take one of his classes I highly suggest doing so His teaching is what initiated by own passion for social and housing issues


  2. Taylor Diem Taylor Diem says:

    While I was very skeptical of the opinionated nature of the author at the beginning this book ended up being an incredibly helpful and well rounded in its discussion of Public Housing and Chicago It is an extremely nuanced and sensitive subject The author does a great job of presenting the facts and implications of the policy decisions Worth a read


  3. Frank Stein Frank Stein says:

    Before reading this book I uestioned whether there was anything else to say on the history of Chicago's public housing From journalistic accounts like Kowlotwitz's There Are No Children Here to sociological histories like Sudhir Vanketesh's American Project to general histories like Arnold Hirsch's Building the Second Ghetto the Chicago Housing Authority's failure has been rigorously chronicled by legions of researchers over the years Still this may be the best general history of the CHA out there and maybe the best history of public housing I've ever readThe author starts with an in depth examination of the 1937 Housing Act which started the public housing program and convincingly contradicts the analysis of writers like Gail Radford and James Patterson that its frugality represented a triumph of conservatives He shows that in fact most of the amendments were proposed by liberals and housing activists like Catherine Bauer at the time at least celebrated it as a radical achievement He goes on to show how the intersection of slum clearance ideologies and attempts to rehouse the desperate black poor lead to public housing concentration in the ghetto not simply white racist opposition His largest contribution is to emphasize the importance of skewed child adult ratios averaging over 2 minors under 21 per adult in the CHA versus 05 in the city as a whole and the indefensible spaces of the high rises as creating the basis for social chaos Although I think he overstates the simple importance of this ratio it was certainly one of the crucial factors in the CHA's decline into crime and vandalismAlthough this is a case study of a single city the author provides a better and clearer overview of changing federal housing policies than any other book I've read and deftly shows the interaction between federal and local politics Despite some problems it's occasionally disorganized and the barrage of facts can be hard to follow this book should become the essential history of America's public housing disaster


  4. John Mondragon John Mondragon says:

    Well argued and thoughtful account of the CHA from inception Some of the theses are provocative than they are empirically supported but still interesting A herculean effort to manage the numerous and complex threads but it makes for necessary reading in order to think about the arc of public housing in the US


  5. Lisa Krissoff Lisa Krissoff says:

    This book is a must read for students of Chicago history or those interested in public housing The point about the ratio of children to adults in Chicago’s public housing is especially important


  6. Marigny777 Marigny777 says:

    Despite the often overemphasized and generally repetitive nature of the writing the author manages to bring to light a tragic public policy oversight in the second city which continues to this dayIllustrating all of the major players in the decline of the public housing movement since the 1939 public housing act the book so far has brought many jaw dropping moments especially in the form of statistics triangulating an overwhelming concentration of poverty race and youth demographics in the CHA projects


  7. UChicagoLaw UChicagoLaw says:

    For Chicago residents D Bradford Hunt’s Blueprint for Disaster The Unraveling of Chicago Public Housing recounts the city’s largely failed experiment in public housing I have substantial reservations about Hunt’s ultimate diagnoses but he uses uniue access to public housing records to sketch a compelling perspective on a tragedy that unfolded only slowly over time Aziz Hu


  8. Ajabee Ajabee says:

    While the author did belabor certain points Hunt's emphasis was not misplaced nor a reading distraction This book is written for any interested reader and is critical look at several issues facing the shape and reshaping of both Chicago's neighbors and those of all cities The research is thorough well cited and masterfully used to paint a picture of the plight created by poor planning Well done


  9. Crysta Crysta says:

    Very interesting look at the evolution of public housing and how legislation federal mandates and spectacularly terrible management set Chicago public housing up for failure Read in combination with JS Fuerst's compilation of interviews of former residents When Public Housing Was Paradise I've gained an excellent overview of how and why the system evolved as it did


  10. Shannon Shannon says:

    A well researched multi faceted and critical look at why public housing high rises failed The author explores all relevant political aspects without engaging at least to my reading in spin or bias He tells it like it was An academic but very enlightening read


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10 thoughts on “Blueprint for Disaster: The Unraveling of Chicago Public Housing

  1. Patreisha Patreisha says:

    When I attended Roosevelt University in Chicago in 2008 I had the pleasure of taking Dr Hunt's sociology course Contemporary Urban Issues In addition to learning about urban decal and renewal Dr Hunt gave profound insight and details into the atrocities surrounding public housing in Chicagoland What really stuck with me is the mandatory class field trip where my classmates and I visited several public housing sites in Chicago Seeing the mass devastation that uickly permeated housing geared for the poor Dr Hunt not only discussed the policies that failed to help the poor yet he also lectured on the architecture and architects of the time that where eually at fault for the demise of social housing If anyone has a chance to attend one of his lectures or take one of his classes I highly suggest doing so His teaching is what initiated by own passion for social and housing issues

  2. Taylor Diem Taylor Diem says:

    While I was very skeptical of the opinionated nature of the author at the beginning this book ended up being an incredibly helpful and well rounded in its discussion of Public Housing and Chicago It is an extremely nuanced and sensitive subject The author does a great job of presenting the facts and implications of the policy decisions Worth a read

  3. Frank Stein Frank Stein says:

    Before reading this book I uestioned whether there was anything else to say on the history of Chicago's public housing From journalistic accounts like Kowlotwitz's There Are No Children Here to sociological histories like Sudhir Vanketesh's American Project to general histories like Arnold Hirsch's Building the Second Ghetto the Chicago Housing Authority's failure has been rigorously chronicled by legions of researchers over the years Still this may be the best general history of the CHA out there and maybe the best history of public housing I've ever readThe author starts with an in depth examination of the 1937 Housing Act which started the public housing program and convincingly contradicts the analysis of writers like Gail Radford and James Patterson that its frugality represented a triumph of conservatives He shows that in fact most of the amendments were proposed by liberals and housing activists like Catherine Bauer at the time at least celebrated it as a radical achievement He goes on to show how the intersection of slum clearance ideologies and attempts to rehouse the desperate black poor lead to public housing concentration in the ghetto not simply white racist opposition His largest contribution is to emphasize the importance of skewed child adult ratios averaging over 2 minors under 21 per adult in the CHA versus 05 in the city as a whole and the indefensible spaces of the high rises as creating the basis for social chaos Although I think he overstates the simple importance of this ratio it was certainly one of the crucial factors in the CHA's decline into crime and vandalismAlthough this is a case study of a single city the author provides a better and clearer overview of changing federal housing policies than any other book I've read and deftly shows the interaction between federal and local politics Despite some problems it's occasionally disorganized and the barrage of facts can be hard to follow this book should become the essential history of America's public housing disaster

  4. John Mondragon John Mondragon says:

    Well argued and thoughtful account of the CHA from inception Some of the theses are provocative than they are empirically supported but still interesting A herculean effort to manage the numerous and complex threads but it makes for necessary reading in order to think about the arc of public housing in the US

  5. Lisa Krissoff Lisa Krissoff says:

    This book is a must read for students of Chicago history or those interested in public housing The point about the ratio of children to adults in Chicago’s public housing is especially important

  6. Marigny777 Marigny777 says:

    Despite the often overemphasized and generally repetitive nature of the writing the author manages to bring to light a tragic public policy oversight in the second city which continues to this dayIllustrating all of the major players in the decline of the public housing movement since the 1939 public housing act the book so far has brought many jaw dropping moments especially in the form of statistics triangulating an overwhelming concentration of poverty race and youth demographics in the CHA projects

  7. UChicagoLaw UChicagoLaw says:

    For Chicago residents D Bradford Hunt’s Blueprint for Disaster The Unraveling of Chicago Public Housing recounts the city’s largely failed experiment in public housing I have substantial reservations about Hunt’s ultimate diagnoses but he uses uniue access to public housing records to sketch a compelling perspective on a tragedy that unfolded only slowly over time Aziz Hu

  8. Ajabee Ajabee says:

    While the author did belabor certain points Hunt's emphasis was not misplaced nor a reading distraction This book is written for any interested reader and is critical look at several issues facing the shape and reshaping of both Chicago's neighbors and those of all cities The research is thorough well cited and masterfully used to paint a picture of the plight created by poor planning Well done

  9. Crysta Crysta says:

    Very interesting look at the evolution of public housing and how legislation federal mandates and spectacularly terrible management set Chicago public housing up for failure Read in combination with JS Fuerst's compilation of interviews of former residents When Public Housing Was Paradise I've gained an excellent overview of how and why the system evolved as it did

  10. Shannon Shannon says:

    A well researched multi faceted and critical look at why public housing high rises failed The author explores all relevant political aspects without engaging at least to my reading in spin or bias He tells it like it was An academic but very enlightening read

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *