The Awakener A Memoir of Jack Kerouac and the Fifties ePUB

The Awakener A Memoir of Jack Kerouac and the Fifties ePUB


  • Paperback
  • 180 pages
  • The Awakener A Memoir of Jack Kerouac and the Fifties
  • Helen Weaver
  • English
  • 14 October 2016
  • 9780872865051

10 thoughts on “The Awakener A Memoir of Jack Kerouac and the Fifties

  1. City Lights Booksellers & Publishers City Lights Booksellers & Publishers says:

    In her book 'The Awakener A Memoir of Kerouac and the Fifties' the translator and writer Helen Weaver provides a lush picture of her short turbulent affair with the Beat writer that changed her life In Weaver’s swirling memoir readers will get a fresh perspective on Jack Kerouac and his magnetism as a man and writer The Star Ledger Through her insightful prose and piercing honesty she manages to paint a universal face with this book telling the story of many a man living at an invisible edge If anything Helen Weaver wrote this book for all these human shadows who hunger to be held but who always come to break the embrace before it becomes another cage—John Aiello The Electric ReviewYou won't read these stories anywhere else and definitely not from someone with such an authentic voiceI am absolutely convinced that anyone with an interest in the beat generation or even the 50s and 60s in general will fall in love with The Awakener and with Helen Weaver—Rick Dale The Daily BeatThe most recent book to join the body of literature by women who lived with and among the famous Beat writers is Helen Weaver’s The Awakener A Memoir of Kerouac and the Fifties While Kerouac and the 1950s are a part of this book they are not the entire book or even its most riveting sections Parts of the book are indeed about Kerouac’s power and influence However there are significant insightful portraits of other men including Richard Howard one of the most important translators of the past 60 or so years who has brought Stendhal Baudelaire de Beauvoir and Camus into English Weaver also writes evocatively about Lenny Bruce the comedian and social critic who was tried for obscenity—and convicted of obscenity unlike Ginsberg and Burroughs Her style in The Awakener is distinctly her own as for example when she borrows from both Yiddish and the Beat argot and describes herself as 'a little shiksa chick' She has a wry deadpan sense of humor and sometimes sounds tongue in cheek Candidly she describes her physical ailments her love affairs in New York and in Europe—including her orgasms—and her therapy in Freudian analysis Her strength is in psychology understanding her own motives and the motivations and the motives of Kerouac and Ginsberg—Jonah Raskin The Beat Studies AssociationFirsthand witness to the beat literary movement Weaver pays homage to the man and the writer Jack Kerouac whom she met and fell in love with in 1956 Befriending Kerouac Allen Ginsberg and comic Lenny Bruce she makes these iconic counterculture figures tangible and captures New York's Greenwich Village of the '50s and '60s—Publishers WeeklyWeaver discovered herself in the 1950s with Kerouac and other artists like Ginsberg and Lenny Bruce and although most Americans don't have an impressive list of famous friends her story is our story; every twenty something college graduate experiences the ecstasy of new ideas and profound perception that comes with real life Whether our is in New York City or Nowhere USA Weaver's experience is comparable to all our experiences in this country this is what makes The Awakener so readable and touching; these characters appear in every American's past—Meredith Boe World Literature Today


  2. robin friedman robin friedman says:

    Helen Weaver And Jack KerouacA good deal of the extensive writing on Jack Kerouac 1922 1969 has been done by the women in his life In 1983 Joyce Johnson published a famous memoir Minor Characters centering upon her relationship as Joyce Glassman with Kerouac from 1957 1959 the years of his notoriety surrounding the publication of On the Road Johnson has recently published a biography of Kerouac's early lifeThe Voice is All which covers the years up to 1951After reading Johnson's books I discovered Helen Weaver's The Awakener A Memoir of Kerouac and the Fifties 2007 Weaver b 1931 had a relationship with Kerouac just before Johnson in late 1956 1957 Weaver's memoir discusses her understandably icy early relationship with Johnson which slowly turned to friendship late in the lives of both women Weaver has had an eventful life in her own right She became a translator of many important works in French the best known of which is her translation of Antoine Artaud with Susan Sontag which was nominated for a National Book Award Weaver is also something of a famous writer on astrology an interest she developed late in life She discusses but for good reasons does not emphasize her astrological endeavors in her Kerouac memoir which remains the book for which she will probably be best rememberedIn The Awakener Weaver offers a reflective look at her life and of Kerouac's place in it Although much of the book takes place later it centers upon as the subtitle indicates a portrayal of bohemian life in the Greenwich Village of the 1950's with its music art cold water flats and young people trying to escape convention Weaver herself was the product of educated upper middle class American life Her family lived in Scarsdale and her father was for many years the Director of Natural Sciences at the Rockefeller Foundation Weaver's father was at first shocked by his grown daughter's interest in astrology before becoming against his better judgment intrigued She was a precocious child who spent much time alone Weaver portrays herself as rebelling against her family's conformity 9 to 5 work ethic mentality and especially sexual repression After an unsuccessful short marriage following college she settled in Greenwich Village sexually experimented with both women and men and worked for various publishing houses She met a young woman named Helen Elliott who became her roommate and interrupted by long uarrels and silences life long friendThe two Helens were interested in rock and roll and psychoanalysis both of which receive much attention in Weaver's memoir In 1956 Kerouac Allen Ginsburg and the two Orlovsky brothers arrived at the Helens' door after a trip to Mexico looking for a place to crashThe young men had earlier been friends with Helen Elliott Kerouac and Weaver uickly developed a relationship Although she loved Kerouac Weaver soon developed doubts about him due to what she understood of his Buddhism and his alcoholism among other things When a drunken Kerouac stormed into the apartment late one night with a friend Weaver physically attacked him and ordered him to leave That was essentially the end of the relationship About a week after the breakup Allen Ginsberg set up a blind date for Kerouac with Glassman Kerouac avoided Weaver thereafter although the two had lunch together and a reconciliation as friends in the early 1960's When Kerouac tried to contact Weaver over the phone in the last sad years of his life Weaver avoided himLooking back at the relationship from the passage of many years Weaver tries to make amends She writesI asked Jack to leave not because my analyst told me to and not because of some proto feminist declaration of independence on my part I rejected him for the same reason America rejected him he woke us up in the middle of the night in the long dream of the fifties He interfered with our sleepWeaver ultimately comes to see Kerouac as her Awakener from her early life of conformity denying and avoiding what she wanted from life and sexual unresponsiveness She says she was unable to respond fully to a man until the mid 1960's In the years following her relationship with Kerouac Weaver became involved briefly with Lenny Bruce and worked to assist Bruce's defense in the obscenity trial which left him broken and poor She traveled to Europe before settling into her own path as a translator and a writerThe latter chapters of her memoir describe her reconciliation with Kerouac after his death as Weaver travels to Kerouac's hometown of Lowell becomes involved in many scholarly and popular tributes to his memory and rereads his books Weaver describes the gradual rise in Kerouac's literary reputation and she writes perceptively about his books including Dr Sax Visions of Cody and Kerouac's own biography of the Buddha Wake Up Late in her life Weaver became highly sympathetic to Buddhism and the the understanding of it which Kerouac tried to express when they were together She writes insightfully about Kerouac's and her own relationship to BuddhismIn his early enthusiasm for Buddhism and his elouent transmission of its teachings he showed us a path he couldn't take himself The bridge doesn't get to the other side it remains suspended a bridge for others to pass overWeaver has written a thoughtful portrayal of Kerouac for the many readers who remain interested in his writings and his times The book is also an engaging autobiography as Weaver comes to understand her life her friends her relationship with Kerouac and to find a degree of peace with herselfRobin Friedman


  3. Melissa Melissa says:

    For a book about Kerouac there was disappointingly little Kerouac I finished the book and didn't wholly dislike it but I certainly don't recommend it Very misleading


  4. Louis Louis says:

    Endearing and sort of pointless Weaver had a love affair with Kerouac that lasted less than two months She also slept with Lenny Bruce once Boom MemoirOkay that's pretty harsh She does a nice job of reflecting Greenwich Village in the fifties and early sixties through the eyes not of a famous writer or musician but a normal social young person She and her roommate also named Helen hated nine to five jobs she had one bourgeois morality the phone company and most politicians They were thrilled partakers of a cultural movement but always struggling to keep in step as evidenced by their attempted Dictionary of Hip itself a painfully unhip idea Weaver's now an astrologer and one gets the sense reading skimming the Asrological Appendix that she attaches including charts for her the other Helen Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg that this is what she REALLY wanted to write about had she not needed to make concessions to her non batshit readers


  5. Mimi Mimi says:

    I very much enjoyed this book make it a 35 which is mainly an autobiography about 12 or concentrating on Kerouac whom she admits she underestimated at the time of her intimacy with himand then regretted for the rest of her life She writes in very clear elegant prose and gives insight into Jack's character I was amused by her detailed astrology charts of Kerouac Ginsberg and herself in an appendix at the end


  6. Jim Cherry Jim Cherry says:

    In The Awakener Helen Weaver details her relationships in the 50’s after she moved from her parent’s suburban New York home to Greenwich Village Through her roommate Helen Elliott the were known as the two Helen’s she gets to know Jack Kerouac Allen Ginsberg Gregory Corso and Lucien Carr Weaver gives a very intimate portrait of Kerouac through her writing I got a sense of what it was like to know Kerouac and see what a different individual he was I don‘t think I‘ve ever seen Kerouac portrayed in any other book so clearly as a person before In the 60’s she works on the defense of Lenny Bruce during his obscenity trial and she delves into that relationship as well Since she knew Bruce for so short a time only a small portion of the book is dedicated to their relationshipThroughout the book she mixes just the right amount of hindsight with contemporaneous remembrances Shes honest about her reactions and feelings at the times of the events and how she’s come to terms with the events that so changed her life And includes one of the most astute observations I've read in a while When civilizations are young they value their cities When they become decadent they value nature The Awakener isn’t just a memoir about the events of her affairs with Kerouac and Bruce It’s her relationships with them were brief Most of the book is a meditation on how Kerouac and Elliott changed her life for the better the worse and how she’s come to terms with them and made her peace with them and the events of her earlier life in later years The memoir is seamless from the meditations and Weaver’s writing is never dull when the main characters recede from her life They may have physically been gone but they’re with her still and she translates this well to the reader


  7. Ginny Palmieri Ginny Palmieri says:

    I received my copy of this book written by a friend of mine who happened to know all and love many of the beat poets back in the 50s and intended to just thumb through it and then set it aside until I was ready to read it I have a book ethic I rarely break finish one book before picking up the next Well just as with the Daisy Sutra The Awakener forced me to break my own rules Helen Weaver is an accomplished story teller and hers is a story worth telling The combination of those two elements was simply too much This is a uick and engaging read and a compelling account of the roots of the beat generation told by someone who lived it


  8. Melissa Melissa says:

    Helen Weaver's candid memoir of life in Greenwich Village in the 1950's is a compelling read and an inside view into some of the major Beat Generation writers and artists I had the opportunity to read a pre publication copy and I couldn't put it down


  9. Cherie Cherie says:

    A Surprisingly good I wasn't expecting this a memoir about a woman who tried to be oh so daring a Bohemianbut you know Kerouac interfered with her sleep Really interesting; not just another boring Beat memoir Yay


  10. Angela Angela says:

    I loved this book and would highly recommend it to anyone that is a fan of Kerouac the Beat generation andor the 1950s Well written and so good I couldn't put it down


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The Awakener A Memoir of Jack Kerouac and the Fifties❰Reading❯ ➼ The Awakener A Memoir of Jack Kerouac and the Fifties Author Helen Weaver – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Weaver paints a romantic picture of Greenwich Village in the 1950s and '60s when she worked in publishing and hung out with Allen Ginsberg and the poet Richard Howard and was wild and loose getting hi Weaver paints a romantic A Memoir Epub ß picture of Greenwich Village in the s and 's when she worked in publishing and hung out with Allen Ginsberg and the poet Richard Howard and was wild and loose getting high and falling into bed almost immediately with her crushes including Lenny Bruce Her descriptions of the Village are evocative recalling a time when she wore long skirts Capezio ballet shoes and The Awakener eBook Å black stockings' and used to sit in the Bagatelle and have sweet vermouth on the rocks with a twist of lemon' Early on she uotes Pasternak You in others this is your soul' Kerouac's soul lives on through many people Joyce Johnson for one but few have been as adept as Weaver at capturing both him and the New York bohemia of the time He was lucky to Awakener A Memoir PDF ´ have met her Tara McKelvey The New York Times Book Review“There is a tendency for memoirs written by women about The Great Man to be self Awakener A Memoir of Jack PDF/EPUB ² abnegating exercises in a kind of inverted narcissism—the author seeking to prove her worth as muse as consort as chosen one Not so with Helen Weaver’s beautiful plainspoken elegy for her time spent with Jack Kerouac who suddenly appeared at her door Awakener A Memoir of Jack PDF/EPUB ² in the West Village one white frosty morning with Allen Ginsberg who knew Weaver’s roommate in tow”— New York Post“Helen Weaver’s book was a revelation to me This is the most graphic honest shameless and moving documentary of what the newly liberated women in cities got up to—how they lived loved and created Who knew It is time they did And here’s how”—Carolyn Cassady“The book recounts her affair with Kerouac in during the period when he signed his literary contract for On the Road but.

10 thoughts on “The Awakener A Memoir of Jack Kerouac and the Fifties

  1. City Lights Booksellers & Publishers City Lights Booksellers & Publishers says:

    In her book 'The Awakener A Memoir of Kerouac and the Fifties' the translator and writer Helen Weaver provides a lush picture of her short turbulent affair with the Beat writer that changed her life In Weaver’s swirling memoir readers will get a fresh perspective on Jack Kerouac and his magnetism as a man and writer The Star Ledger Through her insightful prose and piercing honesty she manages to paint a universal face with this book telling the story of many a man living at an invisible edge If anything Helen Weaver wrote this book for all these human shadows who hunger to be held but who always come to break the embrace before it becomes another cage—John Aiello The Electric ReviewYou won't read these stories anywhere else and definitely not from someone with such an authentic voiceI am absolutely convinced that anyone with an interest in the beat generation or even the 50s and 60s in general will fall in love with The Awakener and with Helen Weaver—Rick Dale The Daily BeatThe most recent book to join the body of literature by women who lived with and among the famous Beat writers is Helen Weaver’s The Awakener A Memoir of Kerouac and the Fifties While Kerouac and the 1950s are a part of this book they are not the entire book or even its most riveting sections Parts of the book are indeed about Kerouac’s power and influence However there are significant insightful portraits of other men including Richard Howard one of the most important translators of the past 60 or so years who has brought Stendhal Baudelaire de Beauvoir and Camus into English Weaver also writes evocatively about Lenny Bruce the comedian and social critic who was tried for obscenity—and convicted of obscenity unlike Ginsberg and Burroughs Her style in The Awakener is distinctly her own as for example when she borrows from both Yiddish and the Beat argot and describes herself as 'a little shiksa chick' She has a wry deadpan sense of humor and sometimes sounds tongue in cheek Candidly she describes her physical ailments her love affairs in New York and in Europe—including her orgasms—and her therapy in Freudian analysis Her strength is in psychology understanding her own motives and the motivations and the motives of Kerouac and Ginsberg—Jonah Raskin The Beat Studies AssociationFirsthand witness to the beat literary movement Weaver pays homage to the man and the writer Jack Kerouac whom she met and fell in love with in 1956 Befriending Kerouac Allen Ginsberg and comic Lenny Bruce she makes these iconic counterculture figures tangible and captures New York's Greenwich Village of the '50s and '60s—Publishers WeeklyWeaver discovered herself in the 1950s with Kerouac and other artists like Ginsberg and Lenny Bruce and although most Americans don't have an impressive list of famous friends her story is our story; every twenty something college graduate experiences the ecstasy of new ideas and profound perception that comes with real life Whether our is in New York City or Nowhere USA Weaver's experience is comparable to all our experiences in this country this is what makes The Awakener so readable and touching; these characters appear in every American's past—Meredith Boe World Literature Today

  2. robin friedman robin friedman says:

    Helen Weaver And Jack KerouacA good deal of the extensive writing on Jack Kerouac 1922 1969 has been done by the women in his life In 1983 Joyce Johnson published a famous memoir Minor Characters centering upon her relationship as Joyce Glassman with Kerouac from 1957 1959 the years of his notoriety surrounding the publication of On the Road Johnson has recently published a biography of Kerouac's early lifeThe Voice is All which covers the years up to 1951After reading Johnson's books I discovered Helen Weaver's The Awakener A Memoir of Kerouac and the Fifties 2007 Weaver b 1931 had a relationship with Kerouac just before Johnson in late 1956 1957 Weaver's memoir discusses her understandably icy early relationship with Johnson which slowly turned to friendship late in the lives of both women Weaver has had an eventful life in her own right She became a translator of many important works in French the best known of which is her translation of Antoine Artaud with Susan Sontag which was nominated for a National Book Award Weaver is also something of a famous writer on astrology an interest she developed late in life She discusses but for good reasons does not emphasize her astrological endeavors in her Kerouac memoir which remains the book for which she will probably be best rememberedIn The Awakener Weaver offers a reflective look at her life and of Kerouac's place in it Although much of the book takes place later it centers upon as the subtitle indicates a portrayal of bohemian life in the Greenwich Village of the 1950's with its music art cold water flats and young people trying to escape convention Weaver herself was the product of educated upper middle class American life Her family lived in Scarsdale and her father was for many years the Director of Natural Sciences at the Rockefeller Foundation Weaver's father was at first shocked by his grown daughter's interest in astrology before becoming against his better judgment intrigued She was a precocious child who spent much time alone Weaver portrays herself as rebelling against her family's conformity 9 to 5 work ethic mentality and especially sexual repression After an unsuccessful short marriage following college she settled in Greenwich Village sexually experimented with both women and men and worked for various publishing houses She met a young woman named Helen Elliott who became her roommate and interrupted by long uarrels and silences life long friendThe two Helens were interested in rock and roll and psychoanalysis both of which receive much attention in Weaver's memoir In 1956 Kerouac Allen Ginsburg and the two Orlovsky brothers arrived at the Helens' door after a trip to Mexico looking for a place to crashThe young men had earlier been friends with Helen Elliott Kerouac and Weaver uickly developed a relationship Although she loved Kerouac Weaver soon developed doubts about him due to what she understood of his Buddhism and his alcoholism among other things When a drunken Kerouac stormed into the apartment late one night with a friend Weaver physically attacked him and ordered him to leave That was essentially the end of the relationship About a week after the breakup Allen Ginsberg set up a blind date for Kerouac with Glassman Kerouac avoided Weaver thereafter although the two had lunch together and a reconciliation as friends in the early 1960's When Kerouac tried to contact Weaver over the phone in the last sad years of his life Weaver avoided himLooking back at the relationship from the passage of many years Weaver tries to make amends She writesI asked Jack to leave not because my analyst told me to and not because of some proto feminist declaration of independence on my part I rejected him for the same reason America rejected him he woke us up in the middle of the night in the long dream of the fifties He interfered with our sleepWeaver ultimately comes to see Kerouac as her Awakener from her early life of conformity denying and avoiding what she wanted from life and sexual unresponsiveness She says she was unable to respond fully to a man until the mid 1960's In the years following her relationship with Kerouac Weaver became involved briefly with Lenny Bruce and worked to assist Bruce's defense in the obscenity trial which left him broken and poor She traveled to Europe before settling into her own path as a translator and a writerThe latter chapters of her memoir describe her reconciliation with Kerouac after his death as Weaver travels to Kerouac's hometown of Lowell becomes involved in many scholarly and popular tributes to his memory and rereads his books Weaver describes the gradual rise in Kerouac's literary reputation and she writes perceptively about his books including Dr Sax Visions of Cody and Kerouac's own biography of the Buddha Wake Up Late in her life Weaver became highly sympathetic to Buddhism and the the understanding of it which Kerouac tried to express when they were together She writes insightfully about Kerouac's and her own relationship to BuddhismIn his early enthusiasm for Buddhism and his elouent transmission of its teachings he showed us a path he couldn't take himself The bridge doesn't get to the other side it remains suspended a bridge for others to pass overWeaver has written a thoughtful portrayal of Kerouac for the many readers who remain interested in his writings and his times The book is also an engaging autobiography as Weaver comes to understand her life her friends her relationship with Kerouac and to find a degree of peace with herselfRobin Friedman

  3. Melissa Melissa says:

    For a book about Kerouac there was disappointingly little Kerouac I finished the book and didn't wholly dislike it but I certainly don't recommend it Very misleading

  4. Louis Louis says:

    Endearing and sort of pointless Weaver had a love affair with Kerouac that lasted less than two months She also slept with Lenny Bruce once Boom MemoirOkay that's pretty harsh She does a nice job of reflecting Greenwich Village in the fifties and early sixties through the eyes not of a famous writer or musician but a normal social young person She and her roommate also named Helen hated nine to five jobs she had one bourgeois morality the phone company and most politicians They were thrilled partakers of a cultural movement but always struggling to keep in step as evidenced by their attempted Dictionary of Hip itself a painfully unhip idea Weaver's now an astrologer and one gets the sense reading skimming the Asrological Appendix that she attaches including charts for her the other Helen Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg that this is what she REALLY wanted to write about had she not needed to make concessions to her non batshit readers

  5. Mimi Mimi says:

    I very much enjoyed this book make it a 35 which is mainly an autobiography about 12 or concentrating on Kerouac whom she admits she underestimated at the time of her intimacy with himand then regretted for the rest of her life She writes in very clear elegant prose and gives insight into Jack's character I was amused by her detailed astrology charts of Kerouac Ginsberg and herself in an appendix at the end

  6. Jim Cherry Jim Cherry says:

    In The Awakener Helen Weaver details her relationships in the 50’s after she moved from her parent’s suburban New York home to Greenwich Village Through her roommate Helen Elliott the were known as the two Helen’s she gets to know Jack Kerouac Allen Ginsberg Gregory Corso and Lucien Carr Weaver gives a very intimate portrait of Kerouac through her writing I got a sense of what it was like to know Kerouac and see what a different individual he was I don‘t think I‘ve ever seen Kerouac portrayed in any other book so clearly as a person before In the 60’s she works on the defense of Lenny Bruce during his obscenity trial and she delves into that relationship as well Since she knew Bruce for so short a time only a small portion of the book is dedicated to their relationshipThroughout the book she mixes just the right amount of hindsight with contemporaneous remembrances Shes honest about her reactions and feelings at the times of the events and how she’s come to terms with the events that so changed her life And includes one of the most astute observations I've read in a while When civilizations are young they value their cities When they become decadent they value nature The Awakener isn’t just a memoir about the events of her affairs with Kerouac and Bruce It’s her relationships with them were brief Most of the book is a meditation on how Kerouac and Elliott changed her life for the better the worse and how she’s come to terms with them and made her peace with them and the events of her earlier life in later years The memoir is seamless from the meditations and Weaver’s writing is never dull when the main characters recede from her life They may have physically been gone but they’re with her still and she translates this well to the reader

  7. Ginny Palmieri Ginny Palmieri says:

    I received my copy of this book written by a friend of mine who happened to know all and love many of the beat poets back in the 50s and intended to just thumb through it and then set it aside until I was ready to read it I have a book ethic I rarely break finish one book before picking up the next Well just as with the Daisy Sutra The Awakener forced me to break my own rules Helen Weaver is an accomplished story teller and hers is a story worth telling The combination of those two elements was simply too much This is a uick and engaging read and a compelling account of the roots of the beat generation told by someone who lived it

  8. Melissa Melissa says:

    Helen Weaver's candid memoir of life in Greenwich Village in the 1950's is a compelling read and an inside view into some of the major Beat Generation writers and artists I had the opportunity to read a pre publication copy and I couldn't put it down

  9. Cherie Cherie says:

    A Surprisingly good I wasn't expecting this a memoir about a woman who tried to be oh so daring a Bohemianbut you know Kerouac interfered with her sleep Really interesting; not just another boring Beat memoir Yay

  10. Angela Angela says:

    I loved this book and would highly recommend it to anyone that is a fan of Kerouac the Beat generation andor the 1950s Well written and so good I couldn't put it down

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