When Things Fall Apart Heart Advice for Difficult Times

When Things Fall Apart Heart Advice for Difficult Times

When Things Fall Apart Heart Advice for Difficult Times ❮PDF / Epub❯ ☆ When Things Fall Apart Heart Advice for Difficult Times ✪ Author Pema Chödrön – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk The beautiful practicality of her teaching has made Pema Chödrön one of the most beloved of contemporary American spiritual authors among Buddhists and non Buddhists alike A collection of talks she The beautiful practicality of her teaching Fall Apart eBook ´ has made Pema Chödrön one of the most beloved of contemporary American spiritual authors among Buddhists and non Buddhists alike A collection of talks she gave between and the book is a treasury of wisdom for going on living when we are overcome by pain and difficulties Chödrön discusses    •  Using painful emotions to cultivate wisdom compassion and courage    •  Communicating so as to encourage When Things PDF \ others to open up rather than shut down    •  Practices for reversing habitual patterns    •  Methods for working with chaotic situations    •  Ways for creating effective social action.


10 thoughts on “When Things Fall Apart Heart Advice for Difficult Times

  1. Kristy Kristy says:

    I read this book over and over again I LOVE her and her simple straightforward way of talking about really deep spirituality What initially attracted me to this book is kind of a funny story actually I was going through a rough breakup and happened to be wandering through the stacks at the ICPL I pulled this book off the shelf just by chance So she begins the book by telling the story of how her marriage ended when her husband drove up to their house one day and announced that he had met someone else had been having an affair and their marriage was over I was feeling rather bitter that day because of my own situation and remember thinking oh great She's going to go on about how Buddha Lovingkindness flooded her soul at that moment and she just released the whole thing and her soul became lighter and a chorus of Tibetan angels started chanting and it was so great blahblah like I said I was bitter But instead she said she was still for a moment and it was one of those moments where you can't for the life of you tell if it was a second long or an hour long and then she picked up a rock and threw it at him It was then that I knew that this was my kind of nun and decided to read onNeedless to say she doesn't keep throwing rocks at people She actually finds many brilliant ways to cope with pain and ego and loss and all that stuff through Buddhist teaching and then articulates practical ways for regular non nuns like myself to deal with pain and ego and loss in their own life I've since bought and loved a lot of her books and I highly recommend this one to anyone who is dealing with something difficult or just curious about Buddhism in general Very good stuff


  2. Kermit Kermit says:

    My therapist recommended this book when I was dealing with the end of my 11 yr relationship She introduced it to me saying that often when things seems the darkest it just means we on the verge of breakthrough I was like OK that makes some sense Then it sat on my book shelf for 8 YEARS Then my roommate Anya read it and told me it was a MUST READ So I did Wow No really WOWI have never heard Buddhist philosophy laid out so clearly and accessibly for the Western mind And you don't have to be Buddhist And you DON'T have to be falling apart Though if you feel like you are it can help a lot So many goodiesThe title refers to the suffering brought about by CLINGING to fragile security blankets that give us the illusion of immutability in a universe where impermanence is the inevitable human experience Accepting the impermanence of our own worldly existence she says opens our hearts to the vast beauty of the sacred When we are on the verge of such acceptance it seems like the world is falling apart when in fact it is just our illusions that are facing imminent dissolutionShe describes meditation as the practice of pure compassion first for yourself when you first attempt the deceptively and frustratingly difficult practice of meditation and later when meditation provides insight into self and then for loved ones and all humanity Brilliantly accessible It just makes sense


  3. Nita Shoyket Nita Shoyket says:

    It was divine intervention that I found read this book I had just hurriedly packed a trailer full of stuff moved out of my house I was in a bad place I lost my job My marriage was a huge disaster And at age 30 I had to move in with my parents along with my son 12 I was so wrecked I often went into the bathroom to cry I didn't want my son to see me in this state Broken I stayed in a depression for months Seeing this my mom suggested we go to Half Price Books to get out of the house I had no money to buy a book I really had no desire to read anything At the store I browsing thru the shelves I saw this book spine What a load of crap I thought before I opened it But when I read the first section in the store I felt better Hmmm maybe there is something to this I bought it with a credit card If you asked me now how I got thru that difficult time I can honestly answer this book was instrumental I read the book that day Then I reread it over over Then after I used this time off of work to figure out where I wanted to go hatched a plan to help get me there I don't know who said it but it's true when you find yourself in a very dark place use this time to reshape yourself like a butterfly does in its cocoon And when you come out you will be something different something better This book was not only a HUGE turning point it was life saving If I could write this out this in 100 point bold type I would


  4. David Peirce David Peirce says:

    Pema Chodron is one of the first Buddhist writers I found as I began to explore Buddhist philosophy along with Tara Brach and Thich Nhat Hanh These are writers who understand the disconnection of Western culture She writes and talks primarily about dealing with both the subtle undercurrent of fear and the rushes of fear from turbulent events that we all face in life from a Tibetan Buddhist perspective This is my favorite book by her of the 4 or 5 that I own and I've read it at least 10 times in the past 4 yearsI could pick any number of uotes from the book to summarize its purpose and premise Here's one To be fully alive fully human and completely awake is to be continually thrown out of the nest To live fully is to be always in no man's land to experience each moment as completely new and fresh To live is to be willing to die over and over againPema teaches about dealing with the ups and downs of life The Buddhist perspective on this is to face them and let them be as they are Through 22 short chapters Pema elouently progresses from laying out the problem which is that shit happens and we suirm to teaching that the solution is to let everything be as it is to teaching several techniues for doing that It's a true discipline to not reach for entertainment distraction or medication and to just let things beShe writes As human beings not only do we seek resolution but we also feel that we deserve resolution However not only do we not deserve resolution we suffer from resolution We don't deserve resolution; we deserve something better than that We deserve our birthright which is the middle way an open state of mind that can relax with paradox and ambiguity In another chapter she writes Things falling apart is a kind of testing and also a kind of healing We think that the point is to pass the test or to overcome the problem but the truth is that things don’t really get solved They come together and they fall apart Then they come together again and fall apart again It’s just like that The healing comes from letting there be room for all of this to happen room for grief for relief for misery for joy


  5. Lorraine Lesar Lorraine Lesar says:

    As a practicing Buddhist this certainly fell apart for me Did I learn anything new see something from a different perception? The simple answer is no Personally I thought the author preached and was rather detached in the deliverance of her wisdom it verged on the depressing rather than uplifting optimum I was expecting Disappointing


  6. Jenny (Reading Envy) Jenny (Reading Envy) says:

    This book has come up multiple times in conversation in the last year so I decided to get it from the library This will be a book I will buy to keep in my collection to pull off the shelf and read bits of when I'm having a rough time I actually wish I had it a couple of years ago when things really did fall apart for a while More typically life is full of moments where minor things go wrong when you get angry or sad about a particular situation or when you get bogged down with the shoulds This book addresses the bigger difficulties as well as the daily ones “To stay with that shakiness to stay with a broken heart with a rumbling stomach with the feeling of hopelessness and wanting to get revenge that is the path of true awakening Sticking with that uncertainty getting the knack of relaxing in the midst of chaos learning not to panic this is the spiritual path” Despite the fact that I'm proclaiming I will buy this right away I still am giving it only four stars I am not Buddhist and don't have a glossary of Buddhist lingo in my head I struggled in some chapters with remembering the meanings of some of those words and it interrupted the flow for me I would rather have had the ideas presented in simple language than feel like I was being Instructed in Buddhist Precepts and that there would be a uiz at the endThe general concepts boil down to that we can learn to live with discomfort with pain with dark times because they are a part of life And if we can be compassionate with ourselves we will be able to pay attention to our own thoughts and feelings while also extending it outward to other people and our community If that's Buddhism sign me up


  7. Sienna Sienna says:

    This is the sort of book that enters your life precisely when you need it when you're living the title and not much else Or precisely this is the sort of book you don't pick up until you need it — when your husband hands you his copy your mother extols the virtues of the author and your best friend nods sagely from the other side of the world because if there's no wisdom in love where are you going to find it? Take another lookThere's so much to admire in Buddhism and so little I've always thought of Buddhism in me I have no desire to be without desire to embrace suffering or settle for hopelessness — and I know that statement reflects a lack of understanding but I am too close to hope right now to set it aside Still Pema Chödrön writes so elegantly and elouently about pain grief and anger that it's nigh impossible to read her words without being changed by them last night I dreamt a nightmare and turned toward the fear instead of running away from it On the surface nothing happened Whatever had frightened me became an inky fog that enveloped a suddenly much less worried dream self and eventually became these words When Things Fall Apart contains twenty two chapters that will ask a lot of you You'll need to approach them with honesty openness patience and gentleness You'll have to be willing to hold a mirror up to yourself and not only accept what it shows you but love that reflection It's easy to read these brief meditations in moments of stillness and sense the rightness they contain; much challenging is the act of practicing in the midst of despair or joy or distraction But practice is exactly what they demand and what we need Neither indulging obsessive thoughts that aren't doing anyone any good least of all those of us nurturing them nor suppressing uncomfortable feelings that we might deal with later if by later we mean never What good will never do if we fail to experience now which is always available to us?


  8. Sleepless Dreamer Sleepless Dreamer says:

    It's the Jewish new year now During the Jewish month of Alul I usually try to spend time evaluating the last year and figuring out what's next And man this year This year wasn't good for anyone I realize that And yet I'm finishing this year feeling thoroughly disappointed with myself in practically every aspect Without getting to deep into my own life I didn't manage to achieve nearly every goal I set for myself Somehow it feels like I lost myself this year I stopped doing things that I used to think defined me without realizing that I was shedding away critical parts of myself I worked so hard but I wasn't working for the right things I forgot that you also need time for other things Last year was so perfect that it makes sense everything afterwards would be a little harder Chödrön mentions that it's easy to talk a big game about inner peace but much harder to achieve it once you're actually in pain This is remarkably accurate It was so hard to focus on the right things once so much was going on Reading this book felt like healing It reminded me what's actually important It's such a grounded book and it's full of exactly the life advice I needed now Last year I forgot how to be kind I didn't strive to be attentive I focused on proving myself to other people I lost my happiness in order to fit into a space that was never mine I let myself think too much about my own issues with confidence instead of truly opening myself to others This book reminded me that there are other ways to live It put things into perspective It made me uestion why I ever held these things in high regard I lost myself but this book made me feel like I can find balance again  It made me realize I want to get back to volunteering to helping other people without getting anything from it to be surrounded by people who are doing good in this world I want to find spaces to do art again to do theater again to create things recklessly without worrying about making a career out of them Chödrön talks about simply relaxing thinking about things lightly and I realized that that's exactly where the problem has been I've been doing a lot but most of it hasn't been right There's so much joy and beauty in life and I'm furious that I missed out on so much this year because I was busy criticizing myself that I let myself believe my grade in Micro economics matters the slightest in this world that I forgot true happiness comes from balance it comes from harmony and self acceptance it doesn't come from getting 100s I want to succeed in this degree with my curiosity and enthusiasm not with anxiety and panic Striving for good grades is a form of escapism my own security blanket against a future that seems scary I'm done with that    Chödrön discusses the three truths impermanence egolessness and suffering Reading that one chapter felt like suddenly breathing It's such a healthy way of looking at life I haven't given myself space to think about life at all in the last 10 months and I'm realizing how harmful that was To conclude I'm really glad I came across this book now I'm definitely going to take some time to figure out how to actually infuse these ideas into my life If you're also looking for some spiritual advice this is a solid bookWhat I'm Taking With Me I feel like I read one self help book a year but I'm very particular about when and which ones Man three days without my phone I am so excited I appreciated that this didn't feel religious it felt very practical Sometimes you're fortunate enough that a book shows up in your life precisely when you need it This is one of those times Review to come


  9. Thomas Thomas says:

    A thought provoking book about embracing pain and approaching our struggles with openness and curiosity Similar to Radical Acceptance by Tara Brach When Things Fall Apart encourages us to accept our fears to better understand them instead of running away from our doubts or distracting ourselves in unhealthful ways As someone who has had his fair share of traumas and heartbreaks as well as joys and privileges I loved Pema Chodron's continued emphasis on appreciating times of pain as well as times of prosperity I also enjoyed her focus on recognizing impermanence and how we all try to cling to notions of forever when in reality everything comes to an end so cherish every moment and make the good ones last While this book contains a steady stream of wisdom free flowing and less applied than Brach's Radical Acceptance I will share two specific wonderful uotes to end my reviewOn letting there be room We think that the point is to pass the test or to overcome the problem but the truth is that things don't really get solved They come together and they fall apart Then they come together again and they fall apart again It's just like that The healing comes from letting there be room for all of this to happen room for grief for relief for misery for joyOn being fully alive To be fully alive fully human and completely awake is to be continually thrown out of the nest To live fully is to be always in no man's land to experience each moment as completely new and fresh To live is to be willing to die over and over againFor insight check out When Things Fall Apart


  10. CultDoctor CultDoctor says:

    uite possibly the most impacting book I have ever read in my life I picked this up when I thought things were going wonderfully I had no idea how much there was in life As I become wholehearted in my journey of gentle honesty it comes as uite a shock to realize how much I've blinded myself to some of the ways I've caused harm My style has been so ingrained that I've not heard when others have tried to tell me either kindly or rudely that I am causing harm by the way I am or the way I relate with others I've become so used to the way I do things that somehow I thought that others were used to it too Wonderful wonderful wonderful Heart advise for difficult times intimacy without fear I honestly avoided this book because of the Buddhist perspective Instead it was a beautiful LIFE perspective not a book on Buddhism Coming from a thick Christian perspective I found this book to have a healthy fertile journey of what everyone who wants fullness peace healing Absolutely the most wonderful book I have ever read


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10 thoughts on “When Things Fall Apart Heart Advice for Difficult Times

  1. Kristy Kristy says:

    I read this book over and over again I LOVE her and her simple straightforward way of talking about really deep spirituality What initially attracted me to this book is kind of a funny story actually I was going through a rough breakup and happened to be wandering through the stacks at the ICPL I pulled this book off the shelf just by chance So she begins the book by telling the story of how her marriage ended when her husband drove up to their house one day and announced that he had met someone else had been having an affair and their marriage was over I was feeling rather bitter that day because of my own situation and remember thinking oh great She's going to go on about how Buddha Lovingkindness flooded her soul at that moment and she just released the whole thing and her soul became lighter and a chorus of Tibetan angels started chanting and it was so great blahblah like I said I was bitter But instead she said she was still for a moment and it was one of those moments where you can't for the life of you tell if it was a second long or an hour long and then she picked up a rock and threw it at him It was then that I knew that this was my kind of nun and decided to read onNeedless to say she doesn't keep throwing rocks at people She actually finds many brilliant ways to cope with pain and ego and loss and all that stuff through Buddhist teaching and then articulates practical ways for regular non nuns like myself to deal with pain and ego and loss in their own life I've since bought and loved a lot of her books and I highly recommend this one to anyone who is dealing with something difficult or just curious about Buddhism in general Very good stuff

  2. Kermit Kermit says:

    My therapist recommended this book when I was dealing with the end of my 11 yr relationship She introduced it to me saying that often when things seems the darkest it just means we on the verge of breakthrough I was like OK that makes some sense Then it sat on my book shelf for 8 YEARS Then my roommate Anya read it and told me it was a MUST READ So I did Wow No really WOWI have never heard Buddhist philosophy laid out so clearly and accessibly for the Western mind And you don't have to be Buddhist And you DON'T have to be falling apart Though if you feel like you are it can help a lot So many goodiesThe title refers to the suffering brought about by CLINGING to fragile security blankets that give us the illusion of immutability in a universe where impermanence is the inevitable human experience Accepting the impermanence of our own worldly existence she says opens our hearts to the vast beauty of the sacred When we are on the verge of such acceptance it seems like the world is falling apart when in fact it is just our illusions that are facing imminent dissolutionShe describes meditation as the practice of pure compassion first for yourself when you first attempt the deceptively and frustratingly difficult practice of meditation and later when meditation provides insight into self and then for loved ones and all humanity Brilliantly accessible It just makes sense

  3. Nita Shoyket Nita Shoyket says:

    It was divine intervention that I found read this book I had just hurriedly packed a trailer full of stuff moved out of my house I was in a bad place I lost my job My marriage was a huge disaster And at age 30 I had to move in with my parents along with my son 12 I was so wrecked I often went into the bathroom to cry I didn't want my son to see me in this state Broken I stayed in a depression for months Seeing this my mom suggested we go to Half Price Books to get out of the house I had no money to buy a book I really had no desire to read anything At the store I browsing thru the shelves I saw this book spine What a load of crap I thought before I opened it But when I read the first section in the store I felt better Hmmm maybe there is something to this I bought it with a credit card If you asked me now how I got thru that difficult time I can honestly answer this book was instrumental I read the book that day Then I reread it over over Then after I used this time off of work to figure out where I wanted to go hatched a plan to help get me there I don't know who said it but it's true when you find yourself in a very dark place use this time to reshape yourself like a butterfly does in its cocoon And when you come out you will be something different something better This book was not only a HUGE turning point it was life saving If I could write this out this in 100 point bold type I would

  4. David Peirce David Peirce says:

    Pema Chodron is one of the first Buddhist writers I found as I began to explore Buddhist philosophy along with Tara Brach and Thich Nhat Hanh These are writers who understand the disconnection of Western culture She writes and talks primarily about dealing with both the subtle undercurrent of fear and the rushes of fear from turbulent events that we all face in life from a Tibetan Buddhist perspective This is my favorite book by her of the 4 or 5 that I own and I've read it at least 10 times in the past 4 yearsI could pick any number of uotes from the book to summarize its purpose and premise Here's one To be fully alive fully human and completely awake is to be continually thrown out of the nest To live fully is to be always in no man's land to experience each moment as completely new and fresh To live is to be willing to die over and over againPema teaches about dealing with the ups and downs of life The Buddhist perspective on this is to face them and let them be as they are Through 22 short chapters Pema elouently progresses from laying out the problem which is that shit happens and we suirm to teaching that the solution is to let everything be as it is to teaching several techniues for doing that It's a true discipline to not reach for entertainment distraction or medication and to just let things beShe writes As human beings not only do we seek resolution but we also feel that we deserve resolution However not only do we not deserve resolution we suffer from resolution We don't deserve resolution; we deserve something better than that We deserve our birthright which is the middle way an open state of mind that can relax with paradox and ambiguity In another chapter she writes Things falling apart is a kind of testing and also a kind of healing We think that the point is to pass the test or to overcome the problem but the truth is that things don’t really get solved They come together and they fall apart Then they come together again and fall apart again It’s just like that The healing comes from letting there be room for all of this to happen room for grief for relief for misery for joy

  5. Lorraine Lesar Lorraine Lesar says:

    As a practicing Buddhist this certainly fell apart for me Did I learn anything new see something from a different perception? The simple answer is no Personally I thought the author preached and was rather detached in the deliverance of her wisdom it verged on the depressing rather than uplifting optimum I was expecting Disappointing

  6. Jenny (Reading Envy) Jenny (Reading Envy) says:

    This book has come up multiple times in conversation in the last year so I decided to get it from the library This will be a book I will buy to keep in my collection to pull off the shelf and read bits of when I'm having a rough time I actually wish I had it a couple of years ago when things really did fall apart for a while More typically life is full of moments where minor things go wrong when you get angry or sad about a particular situation or when you get bogged down with the shoulds This book addresses the bigger difficulties as well as the daily ones “To stay with that shakiness to stay with a broken heart with a rumbling stomach with the feeling of hopelessness and wanting to get revenge that is the path of true awakening Sticking with that uncertainty getting the knack of relaxing in the midst of chaos learning not to panic this is the spiritual path” Despite the fact that I'm proclaiming I will buy this right away I still am giving it only four stars I am not Buddhist and don't have a glossary of Buddhist lingo in my head I struggled in some chapters with remembering the meanings of some of those words and it interrupted the flow for me I would rather have had the ideas presented in simple language than feel like I was being Instructed in Buddhist Precepts and that there would be a uiz at the endThe general concepts boil down to that we can learn to live with discomfort with pain with dark times because they are a part of life And if we can be compassionate with ourselves we will be able to pay attention to our own thoughts and feelings while also extending it outward to other people and our community If that's Buddhism sign me up

  7. Sienna Sienna says:

    This is the sort of book that enters your life precisely when you need it when you're living the title and not much else Or precisely this is the sort of book you don't pick up until you need it — when your husband hands you his copy your mother extols the virtues of the author and your best friend nods sagely from the other side of the world because if there's no wisdom in love where are you going to find it? Take another lookThere's so much to admire in Buddhism and so little I've always thought of Buddhism in me I have no desire to be without desire to embrace suffering or settle for hopelessness — and I know that statement reflects a lack of understanding but I am too close to hope right now to set it aside Still Pema Chödrön writes so elegantly and elouently about pain grief and anger that it's nigh impossible to read her words without being changed by them last night I dreamt a nightmare and turned toward the fear instead of running away from it On the surface nothing happened Whatever had frightened me became an inky fog that enveloped a suddenly much less worried dream self and eventually became these words When Things Fall Apart contains twenty two chapters that will ask a lot of you You'll need to approach them with honesty openness patience and gentleness You'll have to be willing to hold a mirror up to yourself and not only accept what it shows you but love that reflection It's easy to read these brief meditations in moments of stillness and sense the rightness they contain; much challenging is the act of practicing in the midst of despair or joy or distraction But practice is exactly what they demand and what we need Neither indulging obsessive thoughts that aren't doing anyone any good least of all those of us nurturing them nor suppressing uncomfortable feelings that we might deal with later if by later we mean never What good will never do if we fail to experience now which is always available to us?

  8. Sleepless Dreamer Sleepless Dreamer says:

    It's the Jewish new year now During the Jewish month of Alul I usually try to spend time evaluating the last year and figuring out what's next And man this year This year wasn't good for anyone I realize that And yet I'm finishing this year feeling thoroughly disappointed with myself in practically every aspect Without getting to deep into my own life I didn't manage to achieve nearly every goal I set for myself Somehow it feels like I lost myself this year I stopped doing things that I used to think defined me without realizing that I was shedding away critical parts of myself I worked so hard but I wasn't working for the right things I forgot that you also need time for other things Last year was so perfect that it makes sense everything afterwards would be a little harder Chödrön mentions that it's easy to talk a big game about inner peace but much harder to achieve it once you're actually in pain This is remarkably accurate It was so hard to focus on the right things once so much was going on Reading this book felt like healing It reminded me what's actually important It's such a grounded book and it's full of exactly the life advice I needed now Last year I forgot how to be kind I didn't strive to be attentive I focused on proving myself to other people I lost my happiness in order to fit into a space that was never mine I let myself think too much about my own issues with confidence instead of truly opening myself to others This book reminded me that there are other ways to live It put things into perspective It made me uestion why I ever held these things in high regard I lost myself but this book made me feel like I can find balance again  It made me realize I want to get back to volunteering to helping other people without getting anything from it to be surrounded by people who are doing good in this world I want to find spaces to do art again to do theater again to create things recklessly without worrying about making a career out of them Chödrön talks about simply relaxing thinking about things lightly and I realized that that's exactly where the problem has been I've been doing a lot but most of it hasn't been right There's so much joy and beauty in life and I'm furious that I missed out on so much this year because I was busy criticizing myself that I let myself believe my grade in Micro economics matters the slightest in this world that I forgot true happiness comes from balance it comes from harmony and self acceptance it doesn't come from getting 100s I want to succeed in this degree with my curiosity and enthusiasm not with anxiety and panic Striving for good grades is a form of escapism my own security blanket against a future that seems scary I'm done with that    Chödrön discusses the three truths impermanence egolessness and suffering Reading that one chapter felt like suddenly breathing It's such a healthy way of looking at life I haven't given myself space to think about life at all in the last 10 months and I'm realizing how harmful that was To conclude I'm really glad I came across this book now I'm definitely going to take some time to figure out how to actually infuse these ideas into my life If you're also looking for some spiritual advice this is a solid bookWhat I'm Taking With Me I feel like I read one self help book a year but I'm very particular about when and which ones Man three days without my phone I am so excited I appreciated that this didn't feel religious it felt very practical Sometimes you're fortunate enough that a book shows up in your life precisely when you need it This is one of those times Review to come

  9. Thomas Thomas says:

    A thought provoking book about embracing pain and approaching our struggles with openness and curiosity Similar to Radical Acceptance by Tara Brach When Things Fall Apart encourages us to accept our fears to better understand them instead of running away from our doubts or distracting ourselves in unhealthful ways As someone who has had his fair share of traumas and heartbreaks as well as joys and privileges I loved Pema Chodron's continued emphasis on appreciating times of pain as well as times of prosperity I also enjoyed her focus on recognizing impermanence and how we all try to cling to notions of forever when in reality everything comes to an end so cherish every moment and make the good ones last While this book contains a steady stream of wisdom free flowing and less applied than Brach's Radical Acceptance I will share two specific wonderful uotes to end my reviewOn letting there be room We think that the point is to pass the test or to overcome the problem but the truth is that things don't really get solved They come together and they fall apart Then they come together again and they fall apart again It's just like that The healing comes from letting there be room for all of this to happen room for grief for relief for misery for joyOn being fully alive To be fully alive fully human and completely awake is to be continually thrown out of the nest To live fully is to be always in no man's land to experience each moment as completely new and fresh To live is to be willing to die over and over againFor insight check out When Things Fall Apart

  10. CultDoctor CultDoctor says:

    uite possibly the most impacting book I have ever read in my life I picked this up when I thought things were going wonderfully I had no idea how much there was in life As I become wholehearted in my journey of gentle honesty it comes as uite a shock to realize how much I've blinded myself to some of the ways I've caused harm My style has been so ingrained that I've not heard when others have tried to tell me either kindly or rudely that I am causing harm by the way I am or the way I relate with others I've become so used to the way I do things that somehow I thought that others were used to it too Wonderful wonderful wonderful Heart advise for difficult times intimacy without fear I honestly avoided this book because of the Buddhist perspective Instead it was a beautiful LIFE perspective not a book on Buddhism Coming from a thick Christian perspective I found this book to have a healthy fertile journey of what everyone who wants fullness peace healing Absolutely the most wonderful book I have ever read

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *