Known Turf: Bantering with Bandits and Other True Tales

Known Turf: Bantering with Bandits and Other True Tales


Known Turf: Bantering with Bandits and Other True Tales [PDF / Epub] ☄ Known Turf: Bantering with Bandits and Other True Tales ✓ Annie Zaidi – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Known Turf is a collection of essays that slides between genres moving from reportage to travel to memoir and back The author recounts her experiences as a reporter covering stories as diverse as the Known Turf is a collection Bantering with PDF/EPUB À of essays that slides between genres moving from reportage to travel to memoir and back The author recounts her experiences as a reporter covering stories as diverse as the decline of the dacoit in Chambal hunger female foeticide and the seeming resurgence of Sufism in Punjab She goes on to explore starvation particularly amongst a primitive tribal Known Turf: MOBI :Þ community in Madhya Pradesh and weavers in Uttar Pradesh and the ugly failures that permit such extremes of hunger in a nation that is than able to feed itself The discovery of desperate poverty in Punjab comes pegged to an explosive caste dynamic that has caused much religious controversy in recent times The book is unflinching as it makes the connections between economic Turf: Bantering with PDF/EPUB Ã crippling social disempowerment and the moral pressures that make for a society where millions of girls are killed at or before birth However it is the stories of humble folk tortured by hunger discriminated against for reasons of caste or gender that linger.

  • Paperback
  • 280 pages
  • Known Turf: Bantering with Bandits and Other True Tales
  • Annie Zaidi
  • English
  • 08 April 2015
  • 9789380032443

About the Author: Annie Zaidi

Annie Zaidi writes poetry essays Bantering with PDF/EPUB À fiction of varying lengths and scripts for the stage and the screen She is the author of the novel Prelude to a Riot Other books include Known Turf Bantering with Bandits and Other True Tales a collection of essays that was short listed for the Crossword Book Award non fiction Gulab Love Stories to Known Turf: MOBI :Þ and The Good Indian Girl as co authorShe is a.



10 thoughts on “Known Turf: Bantering with Bandits and Other True Tales

  1. TheQuirkyManifesto TheQuirkyManifesto says:

    The Known Turf chronicles the journalistic adventures misadventures of the author She touches upon the myriad axes of oppression in the country class caste religion and gender Despite most of the issues covered were commonplace she was able to introduce some nuances and some humour into them especially the chapters about her encounters with the infamous Chambal dacoits malnutrition the Punjab migration saga and the Deras But it was her self critical reflections on her handling of reporting assignments and Blank Noise project activism which stood out By admitting her fears insecurities and by revealing her own personal evolution Zaidi makes the book relatable for her readers The pace does slacken at times but all in all it is a pleasant read

  2. Dariko Dariko says:

    Loved the last paragraph of the book

  3. Prathap Prathap says:

    Written in simple conversational style yet profound in its ideas Known Turf is relevant now as it was about ten years ago when it came out Deriving from her personal reporting experiences in India's hinterlands Zaidi adds another layer of insights on issues she witnessed during her journalism years The topics range from issues about women's place in the Indian society sufism politics films patriarchy and such Brimming with sharp ideas and peppered with humor the book serves as a veritable cultural commentary and Zaidi's realistic take on what it is to be a woman with an opinion in India

  4. Aniket Patil Aniket Patil says:

    I like the reporting from this journalist may it be columns in the newspaper or the experiences shared in this book and issues highlighted under the topics

  5. Dhruv Sharma Dhruv Sharma says:

    Nice a good collection of essays on different lives and changing times

  6. Charanya Charanya says:

    Why i loved Known Turf A review a statement India is no an underdeveloped nation No It is rising up the highest economic echelons and competing in a world as a torch bearer of the future As we shine the light on the many successes that we have lapped up in the last decade we fail to pay enough consideration to the internal failures many of which do not make it to the news as they are not titillating enough to hold a nation's attention Some that do are soon torn up and forgotten as headlines that are past their ageIndia is still a largely 'uneually developed' nation The diversity that lends India her colour is also the cause of her shortcomings It is this mismatch of reality that Annie Zaidi points out in her book Known TurfSceptical as I am of books by contemporary Indian writers where words such as fuck OMG and dialogues like like you know like of course are callously alluded to literature and bloggers turned authors this book caught my fancy Blame it on her bollywood spersed chapters or a whole chapter dedicated to chaiA mix of reportage and Annie Zaidi's story behind the articles filed for her magazine the book is beautifully nuanced From lighter topics of chai to going into the belly of India to understand the Chambal daakus; from stravation deaths to fractured sufism the book unfolds in mirthy dialogues and hard stated statistics with a personal touchI am currently in The Netherlands studying I miss home Home however has taken on a whole new meaning Home is no my apartment back in Delhi Home is no Delhi Home is India I wax elouent about home with memories enchanting The idea of home that I have built up in my head has however made me shut the doors to many rooms in it Cobwebbed they lie hidden somewhere in my conscience Known Turf has forced me to find the key wipe the dirt off the doors and take a peek into these rooms curiously albeit with a bit of fear on what I may stumble upon I have switched on the lights now in these rooms and hopefully will get to do something to change the way they lookMore about Annie Zaidi her blog

  7. Ankit Jain Ankit Jain says:

    Reading this book felt like having a conversation with the author face to face Ms Zaidi uses research experience and her own analysis to give sometimes hard hitting and sometimes heartfelt commentary on wide ranging subjects relevant to today's India She is eually at ease when talking about matters affecting tribes in Madhya Pradesh and about aspirational modern urban women The chapters on religion and women's rights were most earnestly written and best ones for me personally There are parts where Ms Zaidi writes about no social issue in particular but just about her childhood experiences and what they mean to her today Her discussion of what belonging to a place means to her and how her family shaped her views on religion give the readers an opportunity to know the author in a personal way At the end you establish a connect with the author that you wouldn't with most other authors Whether that's a good thing or not would I suspect depend on how much you agree with Ms Zaidi's views

  8. Ashwani Kumar Ashwani Kumar says:

    a fine book indeedannie zaidi uite effectively brings out various problems which are prevailing in india from corruption to poverty from atrocities on women to the plight of dacoits in chambal etcetra Some of the facts will really make you sit n think about whether india is a democratic nation where evryone has eual say or not?Annie zaidi presents a nice reportage about caste gender hunger poverty banditryit's both surprising and shockinggr8 read

  9. Aditi Aditi says:

    Among the best books I've read this year As a reporter Annie Zaidi goes to all sorts of places in the other India and interviews some unforgettable characters who are struggling to live those affected by caste politics and discrimination tribes whose children are dying of the worst sorts of malnutrition possible She also memorably interviews the notorious daakus of the Chambal Valley which I think will be a classic piece of writing in the years to come

  10. Lubna Lubna says:

    A first hand report of the real India It covers a wide array of journeys and emotions I agree with some observations disagree with some but it is worth picking up to gain insights into the complexities that make India

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 thoughts on “Known Turf: Bantering with Bandits and Other True Tales

  1. TheQuirkyManifesto TheQuirkyManifesto says:

    The Known Turf chronicles the journalistic adventures misadventures of the author She touches upon the myriad axes of oppression in the country class caste religion and gender Despite most of the issues covered were commonplace she was able to introduce some nuances and some humour into them especially the chapters about her encounters with the infamous Chambal dacoits malnutrition the Punjab migration saga and the Deras But it was her self critical reflections on her handling of reporting assignments and Blank Noise project activism which stood out By admitting her fears insecurities and by revealing her own personal evolution Zaidi makes the book relatable for her readers The pace does slacken at times but all in all it is a pleasant read

  2. Dariko Dariko says:

    Loved the last paragraph of the book

  3. Prathap Prathap says:

    Written in simple conversational style yet profound in its ideas Known Turf is relevant now as it was about ten years ago when it came out Deriving from her personal reporting experiences in India's hinterlands Zaidi adds another layer of insights on issues she witnessed during her journalism years The topics range from issues about women's place in the Indian society sufism politics films patriarchy and such Brimming with sharp ideas and peppered with humor the book serves as a veritable cultural commentary and Zaidi's realistic take on what it is to be a woman with an opinion in India

  4. Aniket Patil Aniket Patil says:

    I like the reporting from this journalist may it be columns in the newspaper or the experiences shared in this book and issues highlighted under the topics

  5. Dhruv Sharma Dhruv Sharma says:

    Nice a good collection of essays on different lives and changing times

  6. Charanya Charanya says:

    Why i loved Known Turf A review a statement India is no an underdeveloped nation No It is rising up the highest economic echelons and competing in a world as a torch bearer of the future As we shine the light on the many successes that we have lapped up in the last decade we fail to pay enough consideration to the internal failures many of which do not make it to the news as they are not titillating enough to hold a nation's attention Some that do are soon torn up and forgotten as headlines that are past their ageIndia is still a largely 'uneually developed' nation The diversity that lends India her colour is also the cause of her shortcomings It is this mismatch of reality that Annie Zaidi points out in her book Known TurfSceptical as I am of books by contemporary Indian writers where words such as fuck OMG and dialogues like like you know like of course are callously alluded to literature and bloggers turned authors this book caught my fancy Blame it on her bollywood spersed chapters or a whole chapter dedicated to chaiA mix of reportage and Annie Zaidi's story behind the articles filed for her magazine the book is beautifully nuanced From lighter topics of chai to going into the belly of India to understand the Chambal daakus; from stravation deaths to fractured sufism the book unfolds in mirthy dialogues and hard stated statistics with a personal touchI am currently in The Netherlands studying I miss home Home however has taken on a whole new meaning Home is no my apartment back in Delhi Home is no Delhi Home is India I wax elouent about home with memories enchanting The idea of home that I have built up in my head has however made me shut the doors to many rooms in it Cobwebbed they lie hidden somewhere in my conscience Known Turf has forced me to find the key wipe the dirt off the doors and take a peek into these rooms curiously albeit with a bit of fear on what I may stumble upon I have switched on the lights now in these rooms and hopefully will get to do something to change the way they lookMore about Annie Zaidi her blog

  7. Ankit Jain Ankit Jain says:

    Reading this book felt like having a conversation with the author face to face Ms Zaidi uses research experience and her own analysis to give sometimes hard hitting and sometimes heartfelt commentary on wide ranging subjects relevant to today's India She is eually at ease when talking about matters affecting tribes in Madhya Pradesh and about aspirational modern urban women The chapters on religion and women's rights were most earnestly written and best ones for me personally There are parts where Ms Zaidi writes about no social issue in particular but just about her childhood experiences and what they mean to her today Her discussion of what belonging to a place means to her and how her family shaped her views on religion give the readers an opportunity to know the author in a personal way At the end you establish a connect with the author that you wouldn't with most other authors Whether that's a good thing or not would I suspect depend on how much you agree with Ms Zaidi's views

  8. Ashwani Kumar Ashwani Kumar says:

    a fine book indeedannie zaidi uite effectively brings out various problems which are prevailing in india from corruption to poverty from atrocities on women to the plight of dacoits in chambal etcetra Some of the facts will really make you sit n think about whether india is a democratic nation where evryone has eual say or not?Annie zaidi presents a nice reportage about caste gender hunger poverty banditryit's both surprising and shockinggr8 read

  9. Aditi Aditi says:

    Among the best books I've read this year As a reporter Annie Zaidi goes to all sorts of places in the other India and interviews some unforgettable characters who are struggling to live those affected by caste politics and discrimination tribes whose children are dying of the worst sorts of malnutrition possible She also memorably interviews the notorious daakus of the Chambal Valley which I think will be a classic piece of writing in the years to come

  10. Lubna Lubna says:

    A first hand report of the real India It covers a wide array of journeys and emotions I agree with some observations disagree with some but it is worth picking up to gain insights into the complexities that make India

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *