Essay Collection PDF Þ Paperback

Essay Collection PDF Þ Paperback


    Essay Collection PDF Þ Paperback faith, the Christian in the world, the church, and also a selection of his letters on the subject of Christianity."/>
  • Paperback
  • 429 pages
  • Essay Collection
  • C.S. Lewis
  • English
  • 10 May 2019
  • 9780007136537

10 thoughts on “Essay Collection

  1. Dean Dean says:

    Yes,that's right, five stars....
    I'll tell you in just a moment why!!!
    Well, first of all let me begin by saying that C. S. Lewis in his books and essays exhibits a unique, keen and humorous kind of logic and argumentation which really nobody can resist for a long time.
    And so this exquisite and precious essay collection isn't an exception.
    Let me say it openly and sincerely (but hark, this is only between us)....
    Buddy, in exchange for your money for this collection, you get seriously something extreme valuable!!!
    I can hear you asking me: and why is that so?....
    So, listen, and listen very carefully; because I will tell you only this time:
    This essay collection will open your mind, so that you will see things as never before!!!
    And believe me, you will liken it.....
    It's true, after reading this essays, you won't be the same again....
    But, on the other hand, who says this must be a bad thing?.....
    Let me give you an advice, if you will, come near, nearer..... close to me, closer. That's right, I'll whisper it in your ear:
    don't be fooled under any circumstance by the subtitle Faith, Christianity and the Church
    In reality this book is kind of a treasure chest.... a manual with insight and wisdom for life!!!!
    I think that I've said enough for now.
    If I've attain in making you hungry, in incite at least a little your curiosity, then I'll count me for lucky....
    Because this was my goal and aim, and I wish all my readers the same enjoyment of this book as I've had...
    So, friends, folks and neighbours (as always) all the best for you all.....
    Enjoy and have fun!!!
    Dean:)








  2. Chris Wray Chris Wray says:

    This was truly excellent, and serves as an excellent introduction to C. S. Lewis's writing and thought on faith and Christianity.

    Part One, The Search for God, contains a number of apologetic essays written in defence of Christianity, primarily against naturalism. The broad thrust of these is that Lewis is convinced that the Christian worldview is able to account for reality in a way that a naturalistic worldview cannot. The following extended quote from 'Is Theology Poetry?' is a fine summary of Lewis's arguments in this regard: I was taught at school, when I had done a sum, to 'prove my answer'. The proof or verification of my Christian answer to the cosmic sum is this. When I accept Theology I may find difficulties, at this point or that, in harmonising it with some particular truths which are embedded in the mythical cosmology derived from science. But I can get in, or allow for, science as a whole. Granted that Reason is prior to matter and that the light of that primal Reason illuminates finite minds, I can understand how men should come, by observation and inference, to know a lot about the universe they live in. If, on the other hand, I swallow the scientific cosmology as a whole, then not only can I not fit in Christianity, but I cannot even fit in science. If minds are wholly dependent on brains, and brains on biochemistry, and biochemistry (in the long run) on the meaningless flux of the atoms, I cannot understand how the thought of those minds should have any more significance than the sound of the wind in the trees. And this is to me the final test. This is how I distinguish dreaming and waking. When I am awake I can, in some degree, account for and study me dream. The dragon that pursued me last night can be fitted into my waking world. I know that there are such things as dreams: I know that I had eaten an indigestible dinner: I know that a man of my reading might be expected to dream of dragons. But while in the nightmare I could not have fitted in my waking experience. The waking world is judged more real because it can thus contain the dreaming world: the dreaming world is judged less real because it cannot contain the waking one. For the same reason I am certain that in passing from the scientific point of view to the theological, I have passed from dream to waking. Christian theology can fit in science, art, morality, and the sub-Christian religions. The scientific point of view cannot fit in any of these things, not even science itself. I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen not only because I see it but because by it I see everything else.

    Part Two, Aspects of Faith, covers a wide range of topics related to Christian belief and practice. One of the unifying themes is Lewis's desire to express the truth of a plain, biblically orthodox account of Christianity, and to refute liberal Christianity that seeks to expunge anything supernatural from the Christian message. This is seen in his writing on Jesus himself, when he acidly comments that we may note in passing that He was never regarded as a mere moral teacher. He did not produce that effect on any of the people who actually met him. He produced mainly three effects - Hatred - Terror - Adoration. There was no trace of people expressing mild approval. Again, in writing about Christ and the resurrection, he asks, The question is, I suppose, whether any hypothesis covers the facts so well as the Christian hypothesis. That hypothesis is that God has come down in to the created universe, down to manhood - and come up again, pulling it up with Him. The alternative hypothesis is no legend, nor exaggeration, nor the apparitions of a ghost. It is either lunacy or lies. Unless one can take the second alternative (and I can't) one turns to the Christian theory. 'What are we to make of Christ?' There is no question of what we can make of Him, it is entirely a question of what He intends to make of us. You must accept or reject the story.

    Another point well-made is about the interplay of our emotions, affections and intellect. In writing about the second coming, Lewis' comments could apply to any aspect of our faith, Fear is an emotion: and it is quite impossible - even physically impossible - to maintain any emotion for very long. A perpetual excitement of hope about the second coming is impossible to maintain for the same reason. Crisis-feeling of any sort is essentially transitory. Feelings come and go, and when they come a good use can be made of them; but they cannot be our regular spiritual diet. What is important is not that we should always fear (or hope) about the End but that we should always remember, always take it into account. An analogy may help here. A man of seventy need not be always feeling (much less talking) about his approaching death; but a wise man of seventy should always take it into account.

    The fact that in God we are dealing with a person, and not an impersonal force, energy or power, is also a repeated theme. Further, this person has come into our world in the person of the Lord Jesus Christ, in real, time-bound historical events, My faith even in an earthly friend goes beyond all that could be demonstratively proved; yet in another sense I may often trust him less than he deserves. Again, Looking for God - or Heaven - by exploring space is like reading or seeing all Shakespeare's plays in the hope that you will find Shakespeare as one of the characters or Stratford as one of the places. Shakespeare is in one sense present at every moment in every play. But he is never present in the same way as Falstaff or Lady Macbeth. Nor is he diffused through the play like a gas...God....is related to the universe more as an author is related to a play than as one object in the universe is related to another.

    I was also struck by the insight that taste is not a spiritual value, I enjoyed my breakfast this morning, and I think that was a good thing and do not think it was condemned by God. But I do not think myself a good man for enjoying it. Again, Experience by itself proves nothing. If a man doubts whether he is dreaming or waking, no experiment can solve his doubt, since every experiment may itself be part of the dream. Experience proves this, or that, or nothing, according to the preconceptions we bring to it.

    Some of the other topics that Lewis covers are summarised in the following quotes:

    On the miraculous: There is an activity of God displayed throughout creation, a wholesale activity let us say which men refuse to recognise. The miracles done by God incarnate, living as a man in Palestine, perform the very same things as this wholesale activity, but at a different speed and on a smaller scale. One of their chief purposes is that men having seen a thing done by personal power on the small scale, may recognise, when they see the same thing done on the large scale, that the power behind it is also personal - is indeed the same person who lived among us two thousand years ago. The miracles in fact are a retelling in small letters of the very same story which is written across the whole world in letters too large for some of us to see. Of that larger script part is already visible, part is still unsolved. In other words, some of the miracles do locally what God has already done universally: others do locally what he has not yet done, but will do. In that sense, and from our human point of view, some are reminders and others prophecies.

    On preaching: Our business is to present that which is timeless (the same yesterday, today and tomorrow - Hebrews 8:8) in the particular language of our own age. The bad preacher does exactly the opposite: he takes the ideas of our own age and tricks them out in the traditional language of Christianity....the core of his thought is merely contemporary; only the superficies is traditional. But your teaching must be timeless at its heart and wear a modern dress.

    On politics and theology: Theology teaches us what ends are desirable and what means are lawful, while Politics teaches what means are effective. Thus Theology tells us that every man ought to have a decent wage. Politics tells us by what means this is likely to be attained. Theology tells us which of these means are consistent with justice and charity. On the political question guidance comes not from Revelation but from natural prudence, knowledge of complicated facts and ripe experience. If we have these qualifications we may, of course, state our political opinions: but we must make it quite clear that we are giving our personal judgement and have no command from the Lord.

    On the absurdity of much modern textual criticism: These men ask me to believe they can read between the lines of the old texts; the evidence [that they cannot] is their obvious inability to read (in any sense worth discussing) the lines themselves. They claim to see fern-seed and can;t see an elephant ten yards away in broad daylight.

    On liberal theology: All theology of the liberal type involves at some point - and often involves throughout - the claim that the real behaviour and purpose and teaching of Christ came very rapidly to be misunderstood and misrepresented by his followers, and has been recovered or exhumed only by modern scholars......The idea that any man or writer should be opaque to those who lived in the same culture, spoke the same language, shared the same habitual imagery and unconscious assumptions, and yet be transparent to those who share none of these advantages is, in my opinion, preposterous.

    On the poetic nature of much religious language: My conclusion is that such [i.e. poetic] language is by no means merely an expression, nor a stimulant, of emotion, but a real medium of information. Which information may, like any other, be true or false....It often does stimulate emotion, by expressing emotion, but usually in order to show us the object to which such emotion would be the response.

    Part 3, The Christian in the World, covers a wide range of cultural and societal topics, and Lewis's writing is so relevant to our 21st Century Western culture that it is almost eerie.

    Why I Am Not A Pacifist particularly stands out as an exquisite (and convincing) example of how to construct and deliver an argument on an ethical question that is not a clear matter of right and wrong. The first part of this is constructing the argument:
    - We need facts, either from our own senses or from the reports of other minds (that is, from sense or authority).
    - We need to exercise the direct, simple act of the mind perceiving self-evident truth (intuition).
    - We need to apply the art or skill of arranging the facts so as to yield a series of such intuitions which linked together produce a proof of the truth or falsehood of the proposition we are considering.
    The second part relates to the conscience, which itself consists of two parts or senses. The first is when we are moved to do right or refrain from wrong, and in this sense the authority of the conscience is absolute. The second is our judgement as to what is right and wrong, and is a mixture of inarguable intuitions and highly arguable processes of reasoning or of submission to authority.
    These are profoundly helpful principles to bear in mind when considering pacifism, and many other contended moral and ethical topics where we do not have a clear command to go on.

    On prayer: 'Praying for particular things,' said I, 'always seems to me like advising God how to run the world. Wouldn't it be wiser to assume that He knows best?' 'On the same principle,' said he 'I suppose you never ask a man next to you to pass you the salt, because God knows best whether you ought to have salt or not. And I suppose you never take an umbrella, because God knows best whether you ought to be wet or dry.' 'That's quite different,' I protested. 'I don't see why', said he. 'The odd thing is that He should let us influence the course of events at all. But since He lets us do it in one way, I don't see why He shouldn't let us do it in the other.'

    Part 4, The Church, is much more brief. Lewis's thoughts on the reunification of the church were particularly striking, and also touched on the situation in my own birthplace of Northern Ireland. In relation to the difference between Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Lewis points out that in the 20th (and now the 21st) century, these are more strictly or clearly theological. At the time of the Reformation, the strictly theological differences were hopelessly entangled with differences of nationality, class, politics, and the less essential differences of ritual. Lewis insightfully points out that he noticed this in part due to growing up in Northern Ireland, where the former state of affairs lives on (and does in fact to this day).

    In sum, this was a thoroughly stimulating collection of essays, and one which I will certainly revisit time and again.


  3. Brian Neises Brian Neises says:

    Love it! Will reread for years to come.


  4. Rod Zinkel Rod Zinkel says:

    The collection strikes me as a reflection of the concerns of an intellectual, educated man regarding Christianity and culture. He is a social critic with a keen eye for the motives of people, largely by a piercing look at himself. He is not so much interested in theology as in how we live in a fallen state and might live more like Christ. He asks hard questions the skeptic may ask: how can a Christian be anything but a pacifist? How can you believe in miracles? Is belief in God necessary for ethics? Lewis answers such questions from a lay person’s perspective, and as a man with atheism in his background, as well as a ‘secular’ university education. He recognizes what might cause problems for the unbeliever.

    Lewis is more of the moralist than theologian. He will illustrate some of his ideas with scripture, but does not expound on meaning; he illustrates with scripture the way he does with literature, with occasional quotes that succinctly make a point. Lewis clearly recognizes the authority of scripture, of other believers, and of church tradition.


  5. Matt Matt says:

    Lots of Lewis thoughts on a variety of topics.


  6. G.M. Burrow G.M. Burrow says:

    A fine collection of essays—some I’d already read in other publications, others new. Two favs would be “Membership” and “On Living in an Atomic Age.”


  7. Adrian Adrian says:

    Well I do like C.S. Lewis, this was a Christmas present and has taken me this long to read. Its just great, I love thew way in an argument/discussion Lewis in a polite, jokey friendly way is not only able to pull the rug from under his adversarial but sadly the adversary finds that there was a great big hole under the rug to fall through. There are areas of the book that give me problem, the problem is that Lewis assumes that you know what he knows, so he quote passage in Greek, French, German, Latin, without translation, sort of assuming you of course understand what I am saying, No! He also does that with literature so he will quote a passage from some writer 2,000 years ago which obviously he has read, assuming you know the rest of the articles or book again No! But for all that its just great stuff, and I think up to date, by that I mean concerning he started writing before I was born. If you can read it, and give it the time do it.


  8. Bency Elizabeth Bency Elizabeth says:

    good


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Essay Collection❰Download❯ ➾ Essay Collection Author C.S. Lewis – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk As well as his many books, letters and poems, CS Lewis also wrote a great number of essays and shorter pieces on various subjects He wrote extensively on Christian theology and the defence of faith, b As well as his many books, letters and poems, CS Lewis also wrote a great number of essays and shorter pieces on various subjects He wrote extensively on Christian theology and the defence of faith, but also on various ethical issues and on the nature of literature and storytelling This second volume of two collects together all Lewis's religious essays Grouped together by topic, there are overessays covering the search for God, aspects of faith, the Christian in the world, the church, and also a selection of his letters on the subject of Christianity.

10 thoughts on “Essay Collection

  1. Dean Dean says:

    Yes,that's right, five stars....
    I'll tell you in just a moment why!!!
    Well, first of all let me begin by saying that C. S. Lewis in his books and essays exhibits a unique, keen and humorous kind of logic and argumentation which really nobody can resist for a long time.
    And so this exquisite and precious essay collection isn't an exception.
    Let me say it openly and sincerely (but hark, this is only between us)....
    Buddy, in exchange for your money for this collection, you get seriously something extreme valuable!!!
    I can hear you asking me: and why is that so?....
    So, listen, and listen very carefully; because I will tell you only this time:
    This essay collection will open your mind, so that you will see things as never before!!!
    And believe me, you will liken it.....
    It's true, after reading this essays, you won't be the same again....
    But, on the other hand, who says this must be a bad thing?.....
    Let me give you an advice, if you will, come near, nearer..... close to me, closer. That's right, I'll whisper it in your ear:
    don't be fooled under any circumstance by the subtitle Faith, Christianity and the Church
    In reality this book is kind of a treasure chest.... a manual with insight and wisdom for life!!!!
    I think that I've said enough for now.
    If I've attain in making you hungry, in incite at least a little your curiosity, then I'll count me for lucky....
    Because this was my goal and aim, and I wish all my readers the same enjoyment of this book as I've had...
    So, friends, folks and neighbours (as always) all the best for you all.....
    Enjoy and have fun!!!
    Dean:)







  2. Chris Wray Chris Wray says:

    This was truly excellent, and serves as an excellent introduction to C. S. Lewis's writing and thought on faith and Christianity.

    Part One, The Search for God, contains a number of apologetic essays written in defence of Christianity, primarily against naturalism. The broad thrust of these is that Lewis is convinced that the Christian worldview is able to account for reality in a way that a naturalistic worldview cannot. The following extended quote from 'Is Theology Poetry?' is a fine summary of Lewis's arguments in this regard: I was taught at school, when I had done a sum, to 'prove my answer'. The proof or verification of my Christian answer to the cosmic sum is this. When I accept Theology I may find difficulties, at this point or that, in harmonising it with some particular truths which are embedded in the mythical cosmology derived from science. But I can get in, or allow for, science as a whole. Granted that Reason is prior to matter and that the light of that primal Reason illuminates finite minds, I can understand how men should come, by observation and inference, to know a lot about the universe they live in. If, on the other hand, I swallow the scientific cosmology as a whole, then not only can I not fit in Christianity, but I cannot even fit in science. If minds are wholly dependent on brains, and brains on biochemistry, and biochemistry (in the long run) on the meaningless flux of the atoms, I cannot understand how the thought of those minds should have any more significance than the sound of the wind in the trees. And this is to me the final test. This is how I distinguish dreaming and waking. When I am awake I can, in some degree, account for and study me dream. The dragon that pursued me last night can be fitted into my waking world. I know that there are such things as dreams: I know that I had eaten an indigestible dinner: I know that a man of my reading might be expected to dream of dragons. But while in the nightmare I could not have fitted in my waking experience. The waking world is judged more real because it can thus contain the dreaming world: the dreaming world is judged less real because it cannot contain the waking one. For the same reason I am certain that in passing from the scientific point of view to the theological, I have passed from dream to waking. Christian theology can fit in science, art, morality, and the sub-Christian religions. The scientific point of view cannot fit in any of these things, not even science itself. I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen not only because I see it but because by it I see everything else.

    Part Two, Aspects of Faith, covers a wide range of topics related to Christian belief and practice. One of the unifying themes is Lewis's desire to express the truth of a plain, biblically orthodox account of Christianity, and to refute liberal Christianity that seeks to expunge anything supernatural from the Christian message. This is seen in his writing on Jesus himself, when he acidly comments that we may note in passing that He was never regarded as a mere moral teacher. He did not produce that effect on any of the people who actually met him. He produced mainly three effects - Hatred - Terror - Adoration. There was no trace of people expressing mild approval. Again, in writing about Christ and the resurrection, he asks, The question is, I suppose, whether any hypothesis covers the facts so well as the Christian hypothesis. That hypothesis is that God has come down in to the created universe, down to manhood - and come up again, pulling it up with Him. The alternative hypothesis is no legend, nor exaggeration, nor the apparitions of a ghost. It is either lunacy or lies. Unless one can take the second alternative (and I can't) one turns to the Christian theory. 'What are we to make of Christ?' There is no question of what we can make of Him, it is entirely a question of what He intends to make of us. You must accept or reject the story.

    Another point well-made is about the interplay of our emotions, affections and intellect. In writing about the second coming, Lewis' comments could apply to any aspect of our faith, Fear is an emotion: and it is quite impossible - even physically impossible - to maintain any emotion for very long. A perpetual excitement of hope about the second coming is impossible to maintain for the same reason. Crisis-feeling of any sort is essentially transitory. Feelings come and go, and when they come a good use can be made of them; but they cannot be our regular spiritual diet. What is important is not that we should always fear (or hope) about the End but that we should always remember, always take it into account. An analogy may help here. A man of seventy need not be always feeling (much less talking) about his approaching death; but a wise man of seventy should always take it into account.

    The fact that in God we are dealing with a person, and not an impersonal force, energy or power, is also a repeated theme. Further, this person has come into our world in the person of the Lord Jesus Christ, in real, time-bound historical events, My faith even in an earthly friend goes beyond all that could be demonstratively proved; yet in another sense I may often trust him less than he deserves. Again, Looking for God - or Heaven - by exploring space is like reading or seeing all Shakespeare's plays in the hope that you will find Shakespeare as one of the characters or Stratford as one of the places. Shakespeare is in one sense present at every moment in every play. But he is never present in the same way as Falstaff or Lady Macbeth. Nor is he diffused through the play like a gas...God....is related to the universe more as an author is related to a play than as one object in the universe is related to another.

    I was also struck by the insight that taste is not a spiritual value, I enjoyed my breakfast this morning, and I think that was a good thing and do not think it was condemned by God. But I do not think myself a good man for enjoying it. Again, Experience by itself proves nothing. If a man doubts whether he is dreaming or waking, no experiment can solve his doubt, since every experiment may itself be part of the dream. Experience proves this, or that, or nothing, according to the preconceptions we bring to it.

    Some of the other topics that Lewis covers are summarised in the following quotes:

    On the miraculous: There is an activity of God displayed throughout creation, a wholesale activity let us say which men refuse to recognise. The miracles done by God incarnate, living as a man in Palestine, perform the very same things as this wholesale activity, but at a different speed and on a smaller scale. One of their chief purposes is that men having seen a thing done by personal power on the small scale, may recognise, when they see the same thing done on the large scale, that the power behind it is also personal - is indeed the same person who lived among us two thousand years ago. The miracles in fact are a retelling in small letters of the very same story which is written across the whole world in letters too large for some of us to see. Of that larger script part is already visible, part is still unsolved. In other words, some of the miracles do locally what God has already done universally: others do locally what he has not yet done, but will do. In that sense, and from our human point of view, some are reminders and others prophecies.

    On preaching: Our business is to present that which is timeless (the same yesterday, today and tomorrow - Hebrews 8:8) in the particular language of our own age. The bad preacher does exactly the opposite: he takes the ideas of our own age and tricks them out in the traditional language of Christianity....the core of his thought is merely contemporary; only the superficies is traditional. But your teaching must be timeless at its heart and wear a modern dress.

    On politics and theology: Theology teaches us what ends are desirable and what means are lawful, while Politics teaches what means are effective. Thus Theology tells us that every man ought to have a decent wage. Politics tells us by what means this is likely to be attained. Theology tells us which of these means are consistent with justice and charity. On the political question guidance comes not from Revelation but from natural prudence, knowledge of complicated facts and ripe experience. If we have these qualifications we may, of course, state our political opinions: but we must make it quite clear that we are giving our personal judgement and have no command from the Lord.

    On the absurdity of much modern textual criticism: These men ask me to believe they can read between the lines of the old texts; the evidence [that they cannot] is their obvious inability to read (in any sense worth discussing) the lines themselves. They claim to see fern-seed and can;t see an elephant ten yards away in broad daylight.

    On liberal theology: All theology of the liberal type involves at some point - and often involves throughout - the claim that the real behaviour and purpose and teaching of Christ came very rapidly to be misunderstood and misrepresented by his followers, and has been recovered or exhumed only by modern scholars......The idea that any man or writer should be opaque to those who lived in the same culture, spoke the same language, shared the same habitual imagery and unconscious assumptions, and yet be transparent to those who share none of these advantages is, in my opinion, preposterous.

    On the poetic nature of much religious language: My conclusion is that such [i.e. poetic] language is by no means merely an expression, nor a stimulant, of emotion, but a real medium of information. Which information may, like any other, be true or false....It often does stimulate emotion, by expressing emotion, but usually in order to show us the object to which such emotion would be the response.

    Part 3, The Christian in the World, covers a wide range of cultural and societal topics, and Lewis's writing is so relevant to our 21st Century Western culture that it is almost eerie.

    Why I Am Not A Pacifist particularly stands out as an exquisite (and convincing) example of how to construct and deliver an argument on an ethical question that is not a clear matter of right and wrong. The first part of this is constructing the argument:
    - We need facts, either from our own senses or from the reports of other minds (that is, from sense or authority).
    - We need to exercise the direct, simple act of the mind perceiving self-evident truth (intuition).
    - We need to apply the art or skill of arranging the facts so as to yield a series of such intuitions which linked together produce a proof of the truth or falsehood of the proposition we are considering.
    The second part relates to the conscience, which itself consists of two parts or senses. The first is when we are moved to do right or refrain from wrong, and in this sense the authority of the conscience is absolute. The second is our judgement as to what is right and wrong, and is a mixture of inarguable intuitions and highly arguable processes of reasoning or of submission to authority.
    These are profoundly helpful principles to bear in mind when considering pacifism, and many other contended moral and ethical topics where we do not have a clear command to go on.

    On prayer: 'Praying for particular things,' said I, 'always seems to me like advising God how to run the world. Wouldn't it be wiser to assume that He knows best?' 'On the same principle,' said he 'I suppose you never ask a man next to you to pass you the salt, because God knows best whether you ought to have salt or not. And I suppose you never take an umbrella, because God knows best whether you ought to be wet or dry.' 'That's quite different,' I protested. 'I don't see why', said he. 'The odd thing is that He should let us influence the course of events at all. But since He lets us do it in one way, I don't see why He shouldn't let us do it in the other.'

    Part 4, The Church, is much more brief. Lewis's thoughts on the reunification of the church were particularly striking, and also touched on the situation in my own birthplace of Northern Ireland. In relation to the difference between Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, Lewis points out that in the 20th (and now the 21st) century, these are more strictly or clearly theological. At the time of the Reformation, the strictly theological differences were hopelessly entangled with differences of nationality, class, politics, and the less essential differences of ritual. Lewis insightfully points out that he noticed this in part due to growing up in Northern Ireland, where the former state of affairs lives on (and does in fact to this day).

    In sum, this was a thoroughly stimulating collection of essays, and one which I will certainly revisit time and again.

  3. Brian Neises Brian Neises says:

    Love it! Will reread for years to come.

  4. Rod Zinkel Rod Zinkel says:

    The collection strikes me as a reflection of the concerns of an intellectual, educated man regarding Christianity and culture. He is a social critic with a keen eye for the motives of people, largely by a piercing look at himself. He is not so much interested in theology as in how we live in a fallen state and might live more like Christ. He asks hard questions the skeptic may ask: how can a Christian be anything but a pacifist? How can you believe in miracles? Is belief in God necessary for ethics? Lewis answers such questions from a lay person’s perspective, and as a man with atheism in his background, as well as a ‘secular’ university education. He recognizes what might cause problems for the unbeliever.

    Lewis is more of the moralist than theologian. He will illustrate some of his ideas with scripture, but does not expound on meaning; he illustrates with scripture the way he does with literature, with occasional quotes that succinctly make a point. Lewis clearly recognizes the authority of scripture, of other believers, and of church tradition.

  5. Matt Matt says:

    Lots of Lewis thoughts on a variety of topics.

  6. G.M. Burrow G.M. Burrow says:

    A fine collection of essays—some I’d already read in other publications, others new. Two favs would be “Membership” and “On Living in an Atomic Age.”

  7. Adrian Adrian says:

    Well I do like C.S. Lewis, this was a Christmas present and has taken me this long to read. Its just great, I love thew way in an argument/discussion Lewis in a polite, jokey friendly way is not only able to pull the rug from under his adversarial but sadly the adversary finds that there was a great big hole under the rug to fall through. There are areas of the book that give me problem, the problem is that Lewis assumes that you know what he knows, so he quote passage in Greek, French, German, Latin, without translation, sort of assuming you of course understand what I am saying, No! He also does that with literature so he will quote a passage from some writer 2,000 years ago which obviously he has read, assuming you know the rest of the articles or book again No! But for all that its just great stuff, and I think up to date, by that I mean concerning he started writing before I was born. If you can read it, and give it the time do it.

  8. Bency Elizabeth Bency Elizabeth says:

    good

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