1918 : The Last Act Kindle ê 1918 : PDF/EPUB ² The

1918 : The Last Act Kindle ê 1918 : PDF/EPUB ² The

1918 : The Last Act ❰KINDLE❯ ✽ 1918 : The Last Act Author Barrie Pitt – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk By 1918 after three years of war Europe was weary of the stalemate and the terrible slaughter on the Western Front The Russian Front had collapsed but the United States had abandoned her neutral stanc By The Last PDF Æ after three years of war Europe was weary of the stalemate and the terrible slaughter on the Western Front The Russian Front had collapsed but the United States 1918 : PDF/EPUB ² had abandoned her neutral stance and joined the Allies So the stage was set for what would be the last year of the Great WarAcclaimed historian Barrie Pitt describes the savage : The Last PDF Æ battles that raged unceasingly along the Western Front and analyses the policies of the warring powers and studies the men who led them From the German onslaught of st March the Kaiser's Battle designed to force a resolution before America's armies could tip the balance through the struggles in Champagne and the Second Battle of the Marne to the turning point in August and final victory the author gathers together scattered material to make an enthralling book.


About the Author: Barrie Pitt

Barrie Pitt The Last PDF Æ who died on April aged was a highly capable editor of popular histories and the workmanlike author of The Crucible of War a vivid three volume 1918 : PDF/EPUB ² account of the desert warUnder the overall editorship of Sir Basil Liddell Hart he was responsible for the first major part work Purnell's History of the Second World War a : The Last PDF Æ instalment mass circulation series which was launched i.



10 thoughts on “1918 : The Last Act

  1. Jill Hutchinson Jill Hutchinson says:

    I love to read about WWI and the various takes that authors have on exactly what happened during that horrible carnage In almost any history of the Great War the reason that the war suddenly ends in 1918 even though the Germans were still winning battles is explained as one of three 1poor German military leadership; 2 troop morale; or 3 the addition of the Americans to the fighting forces The author takes the high road and blames all three situations which is probably nearer the truth But he also adds one very convincing argument that is not always included in some historiesthat being the blockade of Germany by the Royal Navy and the virtual starvation of the population The military may not have been on its knees uite yet but the civilian population was and revolution was fomentingYou will have to be a military history buff to enjoy this book as the author goes into great detail about the battle tactics complete with maps of the last year of the war I thought it presented an unbiased look at all the politicalmilitary machinations and egos and the author is unafraid to lay blame where it belonged I would recommend it to the reader who is familiar with the first years of the Great War since it is important to know about battlesleadership of the early years to understand the last year of the war to end all wars Recommended


  2. Jan Jan says:

    Decent overview of 1918 on the Western front especially on the operational level but only sporadically addressing the tactical evolution of the first air landbattle doctrines while in addition being rather uneven in it's treatment of political and strategic developments


  3. Regina Mclaughlin Regina Mclaughlin says:

    The most cataclysmic year of the Great War splendidly rendered Looks the devil in the eye Sentences crafted into a sardonic entrainment of event and causality Seriously analytical battle seuences are clad in the armor of tactical study Ethically biased against the sacrificial mindset of combatant commands; partisan toward the lot of the common soldier Alternating views from either side of the trenches bring clarity to mayhem Often heartbreaking but at odd moments thrilling; eg you'll cheer for an intrepid British tank named Music Box In short a book which takes in hand contemporaneous military strategy national culture idiosyncracy of command knowledge of weapon systems the relentless fog of war and the insane geopolitics of the day Heavily influenced by the retrospectives of British scholar Liddell Hart yet lively and readily accessible to a general readership Published in the sixties Barely known today Such is the pity


  4. Mark Mark says:

    Barrie Pitt's history of the final year of the Great War is well written covering the wider contextual challenges for the allies after the offensives of 1917 leaving French morale heavily weakened and British forces under strength and then the German and allied offensives of the spring and summer respectively The author is engaging in style and balances well the depth and breadth of the topic covered it is easy for the reader to get caught up in the excitement and pace of the offensives as the allies move from one assault to another pushing the Germans back Regardless of the German myths created about not being defeated on the battlefield it is evident that they firmly were Many men would certainly have died if the fighting had continued but the end was no longer in doubtWritten in the 1960s the narrative shows it Pitt is very critical of the Staff with barely a positive word to say about them or allied commanders This reflects the wider historical narrative of the time with less recognition of the challenges of the battlefield at the time especially in communications between command and the battlefield Ultimately the role of the Army Commander was not in the front line trenches and this is important to recognise However Pitt rightly argues that allied commanders were slow to recognise different tactical and strategic necessities of the battlefield by 1918 and that Petain and Foch were perhaps the first to recognise the changed approaches reuired to counter the German spring offensives Petain and then the opportunities for offensive in the summer Foch Though also recognises that both of them took fairly blunt approaches justified in the end by the outcomes but perhaps not in the precise method of deliveryPershing and the Americans do not get a positive ride by Pitt; whilst he clearly identifies the valuable role the expectation of large amounts of American troops would provide to the allied forces the stubborn approach of Pershing delayed their entry to the battlefield and when they did arrive fighting in areas of the front not considered critical Further an unwillingness to learn lessons from their allies meant operational tactics from 1916 were adopted at the cost of many livesWith hindsight the developments on the Battlefield appear obvious that the allies had the upper hand and could bring the war to a successful conclusion in 1918 but the preceding years and lessons learnt did not make it obvious to commanders at the time or indeed governments Haig was perhaps one of the few to recognise this which Pitt recognises here though arguably overplays the hindsight perspectiveThe book is well recommended for anyone interested in the last year of the war though consideration should also be given to modern interpretations for example those written by Nick Lloyd and Charles Messenger


  5. George Polansky George Polansky says:

    The end of WWI covered in a highly readable manner Barrie Pitt brings the reader into the heart of the action


  6. Lawrence Lawrence says:

    By 1918 after three years of war Europe was weary of the stalemate and the terrible slaughter on the Western Front The Russian Front had collapsed but the United States had abandoned her neutral stance and joined the Allies So the stage was set for what would be the last year of the Great WarAcclaimed historian Barrie Pitt describes the savage battles that raged unceasingly along the Western Front and analyses the policies of the warring powers and studies the men who led them From the German onslaught of 21st March 1918 the Kaiser's Battle designed to force a resolution before America's armies could tip the balance through the struggles in Champagne and the Second Battle of the Marne to the turning point in August and final victory the author gathers together scattered material to make an enthralling bookREVIEWS Analyses with great lucidity the broad outlines of German and Allied Strategy and is notably successful in his round by round descriptions of the main battles Sunday TelegraphMr Pitt tells it clearly graphically but soberly The blunders at the top and the filth and stench and misery of the trenches are worked into a compelling narrativeDaily Mail


  7. Austin Ward Austin Ward says:

    This book begins in 1914 When the Germans attacked France for attacking their alli which attacked Frances alli for attacking them This is very confusing but yet this is how war usually starts Anyways though I thought this book very accurately described World War 1 for being written in the 1960's I thought the description of every day that passed was detailed in some sort of way that made it uniue instead of just saying They were in trenches British attacked Germany counter attacked and etc I also thought this was pretty interesting how the Allies distributed Germany's power to hold them off as long as they could many people thought Germany was going to win the warbut that's when something spectacular happened after many years of back and forth trench warfare between the Allies and the Axis powers and the Allies asking for help from America but we said we wouldn't be apart of it for fear of joining a foreign war Eventually though after enough of German U boats sank enough of American vessels we have had enough So we called for war against Germany That isn't the only reason we joined though we actually we participating in the war without being in it we were supplying the allies with weapons and ammunition So as we pooled so much money into the allies and it seemed like they were losing we decided to help otherwise we would've lost all the investment we put into the allies So we jumped into the war in 1917 and helped the allies push the axis powers back into their homes and kept in beating them until they surrendered After that s many years of trench warfare countless people dead the war was over and everything was back to normal Germany was punished for their actions including other axis powers and life went back to normal


  8. Greg Schroeder Greg Schroeder says:

    This is a classic history of the last year of World War I Factually it is spot on Pitt traces the combat accurately and clearly I did however find the book to be plodding Perhaps that was the nature of the first world war see my review of Greenwood's Second Battle of the Marne But there are few personal stories and the story is repetitive Haig and Foch fought with each other Haig and Lloyd George hated each other The Americans were pouring into France and would eventually turn the tideReccomended as a reference but a tough slog as a read


  9. Christine Christine says:

    It was written in 1963 so the perspective is antiuated They refer to WWI as in our time but they do a good job of portraying WWI as being fought in the Napoleonic style until the final German offensive which introduced the new German tactics adopted in WWII


  10. Jim Morris Jim Morris says:

    What a great book I can't wait to visit these battlefields again


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10 thoughts on “1918 : The Last Act

  1. Jill Hutchinson Jill Hutchinson says:

    I love to read about WWI and the various takes that authors have on exactly what happened during that horrible carnage In almost any history of the Great War the reason that the war suddenly ends in 1918 even though the Germans were still winning battles is explained as one of three 1poor German military leadership; 2 troop morale; or 3 the addition of the Americans to the fighting forces The author takes the high road and blames all three situations which is probably nearer the truth But he also adds one very convincing argument that is not always included in some historiesthat being the blockade of Germany by the Royal Navy and the virtual starvation of the population The military may not have been on its knees uite yet but the civilian population was and revolution was fomentingYou will have to be a military history buff to enjoy this book as the author goes into great detail about the battle tactics complete with maps of the last year of the war I thought it presented an unbiased look at all the politicalmilitary machinations and egos and the author is unafraid to lay blame where it belonged I would recommend it to the reader who is familiar with the first years of the Great War since it is important to know about battlesleadership of the early years to understand the last year of the war to end all wars Recommended

  2. Jan Jan says:

    Decent overview of 1918 on the Western front especially on the operational level but only sporadically addressing the tactical evolution of the first air landbattle doctrines while in addition being rather uneven in it's treatment of political and strategic developments

  3. Regina Mclaughlin Regina Mclaughlin says:

    The most cataclysmic year of the Great War splendidly rendered Looks the devil in the eye Sentences crafted into a sardonic entrainment of event and causality Seriously analytical battle seuences are clad in the armor of tactical study Ethically biased against the sacrificial mindset of combatant commands; partisan toward the lot of the common soldier Alternating views from either side of the trenches bring clarity to mayhem Often heartbreaking but at odd moments thrilling; eg you'll cheer for an intrepid British tank named Music Box In short a book which takes in hand contemporaneous military strategy national culture idiosyncracy of command knowledge of weapon systems the relentless fog of war and the insane geopolitics of the day Heavily influenced by the retrospectives of British scholar Liddell Hart yet lively and readily accessible to a general readership Published in the sixties Barely known today Such is the pity

  4. Mark Mark says:

    Barrie Pitt's history of the final year of the Great War is well written covering the wider contextual challenges for the allies after the offensives of 1917 leaving French morale heavily weakened and British forces under strength and then the German and allied offensives of the spring and summer respectively The author is engaging in style and balances well the depth and breadth of the topic covered it is easy for the reader to get caught up in the excitement and pace of the offensives as the allies move from one assault to another pushing the Germans back Regardless of the German myths created about not being defeated on the battlefield it is evident that they firmly were Many men would certainly have died if the fighting had continued but the end was no longer in doubtWritten in the 1960s the narrative shows it Pitt is very critical of the Staff with barely a positive word to say about them or allied commanders This reflects the wider historical narrative of the time with less recognition of the challenges of the battlefield at the time especially in communications between command and the battlefield Ultimately the role of the Army Commander was not in the front line trenches and this is important to recognise However Pitt rightly argues that allied commanders were slow to recognise different tactical and strategic necessities of the battlefield by 1918 and that Petain and Foch were perhaps the first to recognise the changed approaches reuired to counter the German spring offensives Petain and then the opportunities for offensive in the summer Foch Though also recognises that both of them took fairly blunt approaches justified in the end by the outcomes but perhaps not in the precise method of deliveryPershing and the Americans do not get a positive ride by Pitt; whilst he clearly identifies the valuable role the expectation of large amounts of American troops would provide to the allied forces the stubborn approach of Pershing delayed their entry to the battlefield and when they did arrive fighting in areas of the front not considered critical Further an unwillingness to learn lessons from their allies meant operational tactics from 1916 were adopted at the cost of many livesWith hindsight the developments on the Battlefield appear obvious that the allies had the upper hand and could bring the war to a successful conclusion in 1918 but the preceding years and lessons learnt did not make it obvious to commanders at the time or indeed governments Haig was perhaps one of the few to recognise this which Pitt recognises here though arguably overplays the hindsight perspectiveThe book is well recommended for anyone interested in the last year of the war though consideration should also be given to modern interpretations for example those written by Nick Lloyd and Charles Messenger

  5. George Polansky George Polansky says:

    The end of WWI covered in a highly readable manner Barrie Pitt brings the reader into the heart of the action

  6. Lawrence Lawrence says:

    By 1918 after three years of war Europe was weary of the stalemate and the terrible slaughter on the Western Front The Russian Front had collapsed but the United States had abandoned her neutral stance and joined the Allies So the stage was set for what would be the last year of the Great WarAcclaimed historian Barrie Pitt describes the savage battles that raged unceasingly along the Western Front and analyses the policies of the warring powers and studies the men who led them From the German onslaught of 21st March 1918 the Kaiser's Battle designed to force a resolution before America's armies could tip the balance through the struggles in Champagne and the Second Battle of the Marne to the turning point in August and final victory the author gathers together scattered material to make an enthralling bookREVIEWS Analyses with great lucidity the broad outlines of German and Allied Strategy and is notably successful in his round by round descriptions of the main battles Sunday TelegraphMr Pitt tells it clearly graphically but soberly The blunders at the top and the filth and stench and misery of the trenches are worked into a compelling narrativeDaily Mail

  7. Austin Ward Austin Ward says:

    This book begins in 1914 When the Germans attacked France for attacking their alli which attacked Frances alli for attacking them This is very confusing but yet this is how war usually starts Anyways though I thought this book very accurately described World War 1 for being written in the 1960's I thought the description of every day that passed was detailed in some sort of way that made it uniue instead of just saying They were in trenches British attacked Germany counter attacked and etc I also thought this was pretty interesting how the Allies distributed Germany's power to hold them off as long as they could many people thought Germany was going to win the warbut that's when something spectacular happened after many years of back and forth trench warfare between the Allies and the Axis powers and the Allies asking for help from America but we said we wouldn't be apart of it for fear of joining a foreign war Eventually though after enough of German U boats sank enough of American vessels we have had enough So we called for war against Germany That isn't the only reason we joined though we actually we participating in the war without being in it we were supplying the allies with weapons and ammunition So as we pooled so much money into the allies and it seemed like they were losing we decided to help otherwise we would've lost all the investment we put into the allies So we jumped into the war in 1917 and helped the allies push the axis powers back into their homes and kept in beating them until they surrendered After that s many years of trench warfare countless people dead the war was over and everything was back to normal Germany was punished for their actions including other axis powers and life went back to normal

  8. Greg Schroeder Greg Schroeder says:

    This is a classic history of the last year of World War I Factually it is spot on Pitt traces the combat accurately and clearly I did however find the book to be plodding Perhaps that was the nature of the first world war see my review of Greenwood's Second Battle of the Marne But there are few personal stories and the story is repetitive Haig and Foch fought with each other Haig and Lloyd George hated each other The Americans were pouring into France and would eventually turn the tideReccomended as a reference but a tough slog as a read

  9. Christine Christine says:

    It was written in 1963 so the perspective is antiuated They refer to WWI as in our time but they do a good job of portraying WWI as being fought in the Napoleonic style until the final German offensive which introduced the new German tactics adopted in WWII

  10. Jim Morris Jim Morris says:

    What a great book I can't wait to visit these battlefields again

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *