Gem in the Lotus: The Seeding of Indian Civilization

Gem in the Lotus: The Seeding of Indian Civilization



10 thoughts on “Gem in the Lotus: The Seeding of Indian Civilization

  1. Nisha Sadasivan Nisha Sadasivan says:

    Dear Mr AbrahamThe first half of the book was very interesting and entertaining The second half let me down very badlyAre you aware of the fact that India includes the peninsular region as well? I am not sure if they taught you this in school Though you have included a lot of references from Sangam literature you don't seem to realise that they are very much part of India and not even a single chapter was dedicated to them Shame on you And something called NE also exists in India Reuest you to look into the Indian map closely While you severely berate the yesteryear historians Brahmins for not mentioning Porus aka Purus in their literature do you think you are any better? Think again You aren't PeriodPersonally I don't think leaving out Alexander from our history was a big deal I don't believe the ambitions of a man who tried to conuer bits and pieces of land from Greece up to Himalayas and declaring he had conuered the whole world is not worthy of much when you think about it Its just a small part of Eurasia after all This history book is severely lacking in maps paintings and architectural details of the early Civilizations Knock Knock Have you heard of any of these before?I do not find any details on the scientific achievements on ancient Indians there is of religious mockery of Hinduism and Jainism and a Buddhism that's blown out of proportion Almost a uarter of the book dedicated to all kinds of non sense mentioned in Arthasathra by a Kautilya now who was this fellow? Nobody knows It was informative no doubt but you no doubt need a positive outlook at thingsI am not reading any of your other books This is it


  2. Saju Pillai Saju Pillai says:

    Eraly Abraham's book on the beginnings of Indian Civilization covering a vast time period from the IVC to the end of Asoka's rule is a must read for the layman interested in ancient Indian history The earlier chapters about IVC Vedic Aryans are especially readable Eraly successfully tries to give the reader a sense of the social structures from the viewpoint of an average citizen of the time His description of Vedic times is uite entertaining Sadly the book drags a little towards the ending especially the chapters dedicated to Arthashastra are rather dry but this cant be helped given the nature of the source I pity the tons of people who walk into bookstores buy Arthashastra on a whim to gain some sort of insight or advantage in their managerial careers without realizing that the Arthashastra has pages devoted to taxation than any other topic Eraly tries to use the Arthashastra as a way to explain Mauryan government society but this is suspect; firstly Ashoka changed his mode of governance from the strict Arthashastra prescriptions to the Dharma based welfare model and secondly the Mauryan empire was so huge that each territory was liable to follow it's local customs traditions with only a token acknowledgement of Mauryan standardizationThe biggest flaw in this book is the lack of maps This is surely a cost cutting decision by the publisher; maps diagrams cost ink Readers are recommended to have access to online maps to look up cities rivers territories when needed Overall a much recommended book


  3. Tirath Tirath says:

    An excruciatingly long read but also very enlightening Puts to rest many of the myths that have surrounded ancient India pre 500 ADTopics coveredIndians' love for sexWomen used to be really horny back thenHow cow meat was prevalent at least until the Maurya KingdomThe evolution of preferences of Gods from Indra to Shiva etcThe Aryan influence in India and the Indus Valley CivilizationIdol worship came in uite lateThe origins of Buddhism and its criticismAlexander's conuests in IndiaThe disconnect between Chanakya Kautilya and Chandragupta Maurya The 2 were plausibly never around each otherA long write up on the Arthashastra and how it was implemented through the old kingdomPossible reasons for Indian vegetarianismAnd a lovely ending Brilliant Book uite lenghty Well it is than 2000 years' worth


  4. Surabhi Mahajan Mehra Surabhi Mahajan Mehra says:

    They say the devil is in the details Well details are what you get It might be a long read but it is worth your time and effort


  5. Ayan Dutta Ayan Dutta says:

    What a wonderful book this is Starts with geology of the Indian subcontinent and then moves on to till the end of Ashoka’s rule But unlike other history books the author uses various sources private lives alternate chronicles to weave a storyThis book covers a detailed exposition of the Vedas Upanishads Buddhist Scriptures the Arthashastra Definitely worth a second read


  6. A Man Called Ove A Man Called Ove says:

    An excellent book on Indian history upto the end of Ashoka's reign Each era Indus valley Vedic post Vedic Buddha Mauryas Ashoka have been covered in sufficient detail The sections on Indus valley and Vedic eras were a delight to read Felt that Kautilya's Artha Shastra unnecessarily occupied 100 pages and that part was dry


  7. Sai Nair Sai Nair says:

    An excellent primer for the study of early Indian civilization dating back to 2100 BC There are only few books which have dealt with an extensive subject matter on Indus Valley people I have read 'Early Indias' by Tony Joseph and David Reich's 'Who we Are' both of which are good recent books with exhaustive details of genetic research but I prefer the writings of Eraly It's the genius of Eraly's writings that time travels you to the late Bronze Age India Eraly is perhaps curious about the same things that I am Who were the people who lived in Indus Valley Civilization ? How did they live ? What did they eat ? How can an egalitarian society like Indus suddenly vanish with hardly any traces of it left in the form of scriptures or other artifacts ? and most importantly How are they connected to the present Indian population ? The book also covers the Indo Aryan migration the Vedic population their trials and tribulations the era during the upanishads and the forgotten ancient emperor of India 'Asoka' who was revived only recently in the 19th century


  8. Praveen Kishore Praveen Kishore says:

    Lucidly vividly and engagingly written history of ancient India the first volume out of six written by Abraham Eraly It is very engaging and entertaining while also providing deeper and broader insight of India's ancient past from Harappan civilisation till Mauryan empire A must read for every one


  9. Karan Thakur Karan Thakur says:

    Perhaps the best book I have read on pre historic India Superbly researched and a pleasure to read Highly recommended


  10. Madhuker Madhuker says:

    Good book Good flow maintained throughout


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Gem in the Lotus: The Seeding of Indian Civilization ☄ Gem in the Lotus: The Seeding of Indian Civilization PDF / Epub ✓ Author Abraham Eraly – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk This sweeping account of ancient India begins with the Indus Valley civilization then moves on to the Vedic Aryan culture the age of religious and philosophical ferment the tenets of Jainism the found This sweeping account the Lotus: Epub á of ancient India begins with the Indus Valley civilization then moves on to the Vedic Aryan culture the age of religious and philosophical ferment the tenets of Jainism the founding and consolidation of Buddhism and Alexander the Great’s advance Gem in eBook ☆ into India It concludes with the Mauryan Empire which in the rd century BC united an enormous area of the Indian subcontinent As in The Mughal Throne Abraham Eraly provides a superb portrait of Indian life and culture.

10 thoughts on “Gem in the Lotus: The Seeding of Indian Civilization

  1. Nisha Sadasivan Nisha Sadasivan says:

    Dear Mr AbrahamThe first half of the book was very interesting and entertaining The second half let me down very badlyAre you aware of the fact that India includes the peninsular region as well? I am not sure if they taught you this in school Though you have included a lot of references from Sangam literature you don't seem to realise that they are very much part of India and not even a single chapter was dedicated to them Shame on you And something called NE also exists in India Reuest you to look into the Indian map closely While you severely berate the yesteryear historians Brahmins for not mentioning Porus aka Purus in their literature do you think you are any better? Think again You aren't PeriodPersonally I don't think leaving out Alexander from our history was a big deal I don't believe the ambitions of a man who tried to conuer bits and pieces of land from Greece up to Himalayas and declaring he had conuered the whole world is not worthy of much when you think about it Its just a small part of Eurasia after all This history book is severely lacking in maps paintings and architectural details of the early Civilizations Knock Knock Have you heard of any of these before?I do not find any details on the scientific achievements on ancient Indians there is of religious mockery of Hinduism and Jainism and a Buddhism that's blown out of proportion Almost a uarter of the book dedicated to all kinds of non sense mentioned in Arthasathra by a Kautilya now who was this fellow? Nobody knows It was informative no doubt but you no doubt need a positive outlook at thingsI am not reading any of your other books This is it

  2. Saju Pillai Saju Pillai says:

    Eraly Abraham's book on the beginnings of Indian Civilization covering a vast time period from the IVC to the end of Asoka's rule is a must read for the layman interested in ancient Indian history The earlier chapters about IVC Vedic Aryans are especially readable Eraly successfully tries to give the reader a sense of the social structures from the viewpoint of an average citizen of the time His description of Vedic times is uite entertaining Sadly the book drags a little towards the ending especially the chapters dedicated to Arthashastra are rather dry but this cant be helped given the nature of the source I pity the tons of people who walk into bookstores buy Arthashastra on a whim to gain some sort of insight or advantage in their managerial careers without realizing that the Arthashastra has pages devoted to taxation than any other topic Eraly tries to use the Arthashastra as a way to explain Mauryan government society but this is suspect; firstly Ashoka changed his mode of governance from the strict Arthashastra prescriptions to the Dharma based welfare model and secondly the Mauryan empire was so huge that each territory was liable to follow it's local customs traditions with only a token acknowledgement of Mauryan standardizationThe biggest flaw in this book is the lack of maps This is surely a cost cutting decision by the publisher; maps diagrams cost ink Readers are recommended to have access to online maps to look up cities rivers territories when needed Overall a much recommended book

  3. Tirath Tirath says:

    An excruciatingly long read but also very enlightening Puts to rest many of the myths that have surrounded ancient India pre 500 ADTopics coveredIndians' love for sexWomen used to be really horny back thenHow cow meat was prevalent at least until the Maurya KingdomThe evolution of preferences of Gods from Indra to Shiva etcThe Aryan influence in India and the Indus Valley CivilizationIdol worship came in uite lateThe origins of Buddhism and its criticismAlexander's conuests in IndiaThe disconnect between Chanakya Kautilya and Chandragupta Maurya The 2 were plausibly never around each otherA long write up on the Arthashastra and how it was implemented through the old kingdomPossible reasons for Indian vegetarianismAnd a lovely ending Brilliant Book uite lenghty Well it is than 2000 years' worth

  4. Surabhi Mahajan Mehra Surabhi Mahajan Mehra says:

    They say the devil is in the details Well details are what you get It might be a long read but it is worth your time and effort

  5. Ayan Dutta Ayan Dutta says:

    What a wonderful book this is Starts with geology of the Indian subcontinent and then moves on to till the end of Ashoka’s rule But unlike other history books the author uses various sources private lives alternate chronicles to weave a storyThis book covers a detailed exposition of the Vedas Upanishads Buddhist Scriptures the Arthashastra Definitely worth a second read

  6. A Man Called Ove A Man Called Ove says:

    An excellent book on Indian history upto the end of Ashoka's reign Each era Indus valley Vedic post Vedic Buddha Mauryas Ashoka have been covered in sufficient detail The sections on Indus valley and Vedic eras were a delight to read Felt that Kautilya's Artha Shastra unnecessarily occupied 100 pages and that part was dry

  7. Sai Nair Sai Nair says:

    An excellent primer for the study of early Indian civilization dating back to 2100 BC There are only few books which have dealt with an extensive subject matter on Indus Valley people I have read 'Early Indias' by Tony Joseph and David Reich's 'Who we Are' both of which are good recent books with exhaustive details of genetic research but I prefer the writings of Eraly It's the genius of Eraly's writings that time travels you to the late Bronze Age India Eraly is perhaps curious about the same things that I am Who were the people who lived in Indus Valley Civilization ? How did they live ? What did they eat ? How can an egalitarian society like Indus suddenly vanish with hardly any traces of it left in the form of scriptures or other artifacts ? and most importantly How are they connected to the present Indian population ? The book also covers the Indo Aryan migration the Vedic population their trials and tribulations the era during the upanishads and the forgotten ancient emperor of India 'Asoka' who was revived only recently in the 19th century

  8. Praveen Kishore Praveen Kishore says:

    Lucidly vividly and engagingly written history of ancient India the first volume out of six written by Abraham Eraly It is very engaging and entertaining while also providing deeper and broader insight of India's ancient past from Harappan civilisation till Mauryan empire A must read for every one

  9. Karan Thakur Karan Thakur says:

    Perhaps the best book I have read on pre historic India Superbly researched and a pleasure to read Highly recommended

  10. Madhuker Madhuker says:

    Good book Good flow maintained throughout

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