Hardcover è Saraswatis Way ePUB Þ

Hardcover è Saraswatis Way ePUB Þ


Saraswatis Way ✹ [BOOKS] ✭ Saraswatis Way By Monika Schröder ❃ – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk The Mystiue of Enlightenment | Moksha | Headache The Mystiue of Enlightenment Free download as Word Doc doc PDF File pdf Text File txt or read online for free U G Krishnamurti Lightning Deals June | O The Mystiue of Enlightenment | Moksha | Headache The Mystiue of Enlightenment Free download as Word Doc doc PDF File pdf Text File txt or read online for free U G Krishnamurti Lightning Deals June | Online ₹ List ₹ % off Orpat OEI Watt Dry Iron White and Blue ₹ List ₹ % off HP X Wired Mouse BlackGrey ₹ List ₹ % off Nemamipa br div classMsoNormalspan stylefont family Arial Helvetica sans serif;bbr bspandivdiv classMsoNormalspan stylefont family Arial THE SECTOR NINE br div stylefont family 'lucida grande' tahoma verdana arial sans serif; line height px; text align left;span stylebackground color black;span carnaticcom carnaticcom Karmasaya Full Text Search Results The Nature of Order Searching for The Nature of Order RecentChanges The most recently changed pages are listed below carnaticcom Karmasaya Full Text Search carnaticcom Karmasaya Full Text Search Results The End of the World Searching for The End of the World RecentChanges The most recently changed pages MpFiestaNew's Blog MpFiestaNew noreplybloggercom Blogger tagbloggercomblog post.

  • Hardcover
  • 240 pages
  • Saraswatis Way
  • Monika Schröder
  • English
  • 08 June 2016
  • 9780374364113

10 thoughts on “Saraswatis Way

  1. Rose Rose says:

    Initial reaction Very unexpected surprise I didn't expect to enjoy this novel as much as I did particularly with it being a random read that I picked up from my local library I thought the environment and details with respect to India were a nice touch and I really liked following Akash's journey and the various characters he comes across Ultimately this is a story of a boy who wants nothing than to learn and get a good education but he weathers some tough spells in the processFull reviewDude you guys do not know how much I enjoyed this book And probably for very simple reasons that others may not share but I'm not even sorry I think it was refreshing to read about an intelligent fortuitous protagonist that has a worthy goal he seeks out but has to weather some difficult circumstances in order to reach that goal Akash comes from a poor family and is actually a very smart boy who works well with the numbers in his head naturally he loves math Unfortunately with respect to the circumstances that his family lives in and a sudden tragedy that throws his world out of balance Akash uestions whether he must live the life he's fated to live or work against the elements to try to reach the goal he ultimately wants in his life His journey takes him from home in the villages to being sent away to do backbreaking labor to pay off a debt to escaping into the larger cityscapes of India and meeting a bunch of colorful characters along the way both friend and foe alike I have to say that the attention to place details as well as the customs and language of India drawn in this novel including the glossary in the back are excellent even particularly for its respective length audience middle grade and genre I flew through this book and found the narrative flow nice I didn't want to put it down and only did when I had to I do wish that I'd had time to get to know the characters and had a deeper immersion with some of the other details of the work the math tricks and the way Akash walked through them with the other characters were cool but I honestly can't complain that much I really enjoyed it and I think people who like uick reads featuring a likable protagonist and an interesting attention to detail with respect to place will find something to take from in this novel I will also say that I appreciate the author's end notes on the realities that Indian children like Akash face each day and I was able to take away uite a bit from thatOverall score 45

  2. Robert Kent Robert Kent says:

    At one point Akash the hero of Saraswati's Way is asked what it's like to read by one of many illiterate boys he meets and he replies “It’s like going to different places without leaving where you are Esteemed Reader I cannot think of a finer way to describe Saraswati’s Way to you This book is a portal to another world not often seen in American fiction the world of India through the eyes of a peasant child It’s a world that will eually tantalize and haunt youLike many Americans I’ll admit that the Ninja is woefully ignorant of other cultures and my knowledge of India comes mostly from Slumdog Millionaire Apu from The Simpsons and Karl Pilkington’s journey to the Taj Mahal on An Idiot Abroad I have Indian friends but they’ve been Americanized If you’re an American who is already very familiar with India and its culture you’re still going to love Saraswati’s Way because at its heart it’s a great story well told But for the ignorant such as myself it is fascinating to have this opportunity to learn about Indian culture and social rules wrapped around a compelling story From a craft perspective Saraswatti’s Way is a great example about how to write about setting and how the choice of setting informs every aspect of the story If you’re a science fiction writer describing other worlds or a small town Indiana boy like me writing about small town Indiana Monika Shroder is a wonderful world builder and her work is worth studying See how she delivers exposition about culture we need to know to understand the story without ever interrupting the story To even understand the title you need to know that Saraswatti is the Indian goddess of knowledge and to know the importance of religion in Indian culture To better illustrate here is what Akash's father tells him early in the story“Son you are just as willful as your mother She always wanted to change things for the better She argued even with your Dadima” Bapu shook his head slowly “Nothing changes because of our doing It’s all in the hands of the gods”And that is what twelve year old Akash is up against a stubborn belief by everyone around him that “that’s just the way it is; some things will never cha a a ange” Akash is a member of a poor farming family and it is his destiny to receive the minimum amount of education and then to become a poor farmer amassing debt he can never pay off But Akash dreams of being able to go to a proper school and to get a proper education and to rise out of the poverty he was born into If he can only get the money for a tutor he can study and perhaps earn a scholarship His family however has no intention of wasting good money on knowledge because as his grandmother most colorfully puts it Why teach a bucket to sing? He doesn’t need to go to school past seventh standard”I can’t decide whether I should compare Saraswati’s Way to a fairy tale or to the work of Charles Dickens Both would be apt comparisons and it won’t surprise me one bit to see Saraswati’s Way become a new middle grade classic as word of mouth spreads about what a fantastic book this is I would personally like to put a copy in the hands of every American child attending school and eating three meals a day because perhaps the Ninja is getting old but these kids today don’t know how lucky they are Reading about Akash’s predicament may remind themEvery August a fever comes to Akash’s village after the wet season and people die—I can’t even imagine living in a place like that At the start of the book the fever claims Akash’s father who is moved to the ground to be in contact with the earth when he dies I’m not sure what the significance of this is as it was not touched on in Karl Pilkington’s journey but it’s one of the many fascinating tidbits about Indian culture I picked up reading this book With him dead Akash’s fate is in his grandmother’s hands His death combined with a poor crop leaves the family in a terrible bind and they will soon lose their home if they cannot pay off their rent debt Thus Akash’s grandmother sends him to work in a child labor campAkash is good with numbers and he soon figures out that at the interest rate his family is being charged he will never pay off the debt He will forever be a slave without an education So Akash hops a train and sets out on his own on an adventure through India There is never a point in the story when Akash is not in conflict He is a strong protagonist with a sympathetic goal beset on all sides by the ineuities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men and yes I did just drop that Pulp Fiction reference in a blog about children’s literature This is the stuff of great storytellingI’m not sure if there is such a thing as edgy middle grade but if there is last week’s The Underneath is edgy and Saraswati’s Way certainly is Personally I’ve come to resent the term “children’s fiction” and would like to see it referred to as family fiction We have family films The main characters in ET The Extra Terrestrial are children and yet that is a “family film” loved by children and adults alike I have no doubt that Saraswati’s Way will be loved by children but Schroder clearly intends for it to be read by adults as well which would explain the inclusion of this sceneIt was tempting to go with the only person he knew in Delhi Akash had no clear idea what he would do when he arrived at the train station But Lal Singh stared at him the way a cat looked before it pounced on a mouse Akash could feel Lal Singh’s damp hand on the small of his back slowly moving closer toward his buttocksChildren may likely read right over this scene without picking up on Lal Singh’s sinister motives for inviting Akash to stay with him but adults won’t So why include it if not for adult readers? What mother could read this story and not have fear for twelve year old Akash alone on the streets of India tripled? They have nasty awful folks in India just like they do here and a child alone is a child who may be approached by predators And India doesn’t even have Chris Hansen and the crew of To Catch a Predator The inclusion of Lal Singh is dealt with uickly and the story moves on which is good because even when handsome Chris Hansen is hosting this stuff is nothing to dwell on and not what Saraswati’s Way is about Lal Singh is simply another point of conflict emphasizing how alone Akash is on his journeyLal Singh is also sigh realistic It’s not a pretty world out there Esteemed Reader and it’s no place for a child to have to survive on his own But children do it here and in even greater numbers in parts of India Akash isn’t going to tour a chocolate factory His story is meant to be real and to invoke reader sympathy for him and the other kids in India in situations similar to or worse than his I’m not going to spoil the whole book for you but Akash later gets involved with drug dealers and other nasty characters Here is a particularly poignant scene that haunts me and I think will give you a nice preview of what to expect in the darker parts of Saraswati’s Way remember all of these characters are children“What are they doing? Akash asked He noticed a sharp smell like gasoline “They are sniffing” Rohit answered“Sniffing what?”“E Raze Cor rec tion fluid” Deepak answered his voice slurred “Even cheaper than glue Same effect Ahhhh” He had lowered the rag“You want some? I have glue” Madhup offered Akash a small plastic bottle and his rag“No thank you” Akash turned to Rohit “What does it do to them?”“It makes them crazy” he answered“No it makes us happy and not hungry” Deepak called“It lets us forget things” Madhup added“After a while it ruins their brains It is very dangerous” Rohit saidBut I don’t want you to go saying “Saraswati’s Way? Some blogger said it was depressing” That’s not true Saraswati’s Way is actually a hopeful and uplifting book I’m really not going to spoil it but just trust me And as for the dark stuff You remember the end of The Color Purple when Celi finally gets to hug Netti and her son and her daughter and even Sophia is happy and it’s just the happiest scene ever and the audience cries happy tears? That scene is happy directly in proportion to how unhappy the journey of Ceili is prior to it And if you haven’t seen The Color Purple go rent itI see we are clearly out of time and yet I have one passage to share with you I’m going to keep harping on this idea for “family” books rather than “children’s” books for several posts to come but there is no reason a story about children can’t include as much complexity as a story about adults To prove it here is a symbolic passage to serve as a metaphor for the children of India that even Nathanial Hawthorne would approve ofThe pigeons continued their fight close to the edge of the roof each of them holding one end of the bread in its beak One bird spread its wings trying to lift the bread and fly but the second pigeon ripped the chapatti apart with a sudden jerk causing both of them to lose the bread The pieces fell to the courtyard below And that’s it for another week Esteemed Reader Come back on Thursday to see Monika Schroder face the 7 uestions and on Saturday to see Jennifer Laughran do the same And definitely come back next week as I’ve got the first of two big surprises planned for you And now as always I will leave you with some of my favorite passages from Saraswati’s Way Wanting was just another kind of hunger burning until satisfiedTheir bare branches ended in thick knobs held upward like the fists of angry menPain flooded Akash like blood soaking a clothThe throw of her sari covered Aunt Kamla’s face but her words shot through the fabric like a camel’s spitHeavy from exhaustion he slowly curled up like a cashewThe color and consistency of the man’s skin reminded Akash of potatoesFor an interview with author Monika Schroeder as well as interviews with other writers and literary agents check out my blog at wwwmiddlegradeninjablogspotcom

  3. Douglas Gibson Douglas Gibson says:

    In following the journey of Akash a budding young mathematician who dreams of getting into a better school than he can find in his village Schröder gives the reader a compelling and often suspenseful story of perseverance despair and faith At the same time no reader can come away unaffected by the portrait this book paints of a modern India where poverty and injustice force children into dilemmas and actions alien even to most Western adults If your test of a good book and your test of a good book for kids is whether it alters the reader's perception of the world I believe Saraswati's Way is worth a look

  4. Kristi Kristi says:

    I was really glad to see this realistic children's fiction book set in India The author obviously knows a lot about the culture and provides a glossary in the back for children reading the book who are unfamiliar with the terms Akash is twelve years old and obsessed with math It's his passion and he dearly wants to continue his schooling But his family is poor and after the death of his father he is forced to go work in a uarry to pay off the family's debt But Akash won't stay He sees the ledger with the amount they are paid the amount they owe and the interest rates He's good enough with numbers to know that the debt will never be paid off He runs away and lives on the street in Delhi This book follows his life on the street and how he tries to get schooling so that he may continue to learn math The plight of many of the street children in Delhi is presented with delicacy and honesty A good multicultural story

  5. Edward Sullivan Edward Sullivan says:

    A moving inspiring story about a young Indian boy determined to improve his lot in life Many details about Indian society and Hinduism are adeptly woven into the story to make for a rich flavorful novel

  6. Inoli Inoli says:

    The writing was simple and straightforward but still well done I rounded up but I would definitely recommend it

  7. Ruby Ruby says:

    Monika Schröder who’s a German based writer came to India and got fascinated by the Indian culture Perhaps because she’s been working as an elementary school teacher for children she keeps in love with children’s fiction Saraswati’s Way is her book that she came up with to establish a ray of hope especially amongst children who are exposed to harsh realities at the very early age tarnishing their dreams However the book is as eually an encouraging read for adults as it should be for children of any age and any socio economic backgrounds Akash is a 12 year old scholar child who loves numbers and wishes to earn a higher scholarship so that he could afford to study further and eventually build an esteemed future for his family and himself He soon realises that dreams are usually trickier to achieve and realities are tyrannical for families that are agricultural labourers in India Throughout his journey from being sold as a slave to Kumar Ji the lender to becoming a jovial assistant to Yogesh the juice stand owner at New Delhi railway station the young Akash bares conviction Despite being exposed to the ineuities of the selfish world he continues to win over his internal conflicts He keeps fighting to choose between selling drugs to earn uicker money and getting admission in one of the best schools and he wins over by choosing the latter eventually Saraswati’s Way is an inspiring tale of a young child who at the end chooses to follow what his white part of soul preaches The book is certainly an entertaining compelling read that gives hope that you can achieve your dreams with determination courage and some luck against all odds as the writer herself says—she successfully has instituted her point Nevertheless I personally have some uestions to the writer Why do we often portray India in such light to the World? Why is that the authors often believe that living in slum and coming out victorious is the only struggle that Indian children could go through? Be it Slumdog Millionaire though I haven’t read the A yet or Saraswati’s Way the authors and film makers document Indian slums the Are not there other sort of mental moral social political and family weights that Indian children face? I mean do not Indian children have to go through such as depression molestation competition or peer pressure humiliation based on race body shaming and so many ? Are there any good booksstories on such issues? If yes do recommend

  8. Faith Huff Faith Huff says:

    With a uick pace and a hero you want to cheer for Saraswati's Way makes for an immersive experience Taking place in India Akash's story is a powerful overview of some of the issues rampant in India especially those of child labor and the dangers of children living on the streets in the cities It's the perfect novel for helping students understand the experiences of someone in their age group on the other side of the world especially one who wants than anything to gain access to education which so many of my own students don't appreciate Walking with Akash through his journey we see him choose the right path which is rarely the easy one and find his way to his dreams The author also includes a note in the back discussing the personal experiences in India that led to the inspiration of this novel and some websites to check out if you're interested in helping out children like Akash

  9. Ariana Ariana says:

    As a middle schooler I think that Saraswati's Way has a great lesson for not only kids my age but everyone It teaches that patience and hardwork is the key to success This story about a young boy who goes through the death of his father after already losing his mother is a good topic to write about especially when it comes to teaching about loss It also shows his journey to getting in to a better school to grow his learning It talks about believing in yourself and being patient along with having bravery It is an amazing book for all ages and has some very good twists and interesting moments in the book I would definitely recommend

  10. Tara Ethridge Tara Ethridge says:

    Very interesting and slightly intense book about a boy in India that has a terrible life and then escapes to New Delhi to try and find a better life He lives in the train station and ekes out a small living helping a magazine seller but he is very smart and talented in math and longs to go to a school where he can shine Lots of twists and turns and some very poor decision making along the way but the story is heartwarming and loads to talk about in this book Reminded me of The Bridge Home and Amal Unbound

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10 thoughts on “Saraswatis Way

  1. Rose Rose says:

    Initial reaction Very unexpected surprise I didn't expect to enjoy this novel as much as I did particularly with it being a random read that I picked up from my local library I thought the environment and details with respect to India were a nice touch and I really liked following Akash's journey and the various characters he comes across Ultimately this is a story of a boy who wants nothing than to learn and get a good education but he weathers some tough spells in the processFull reviewDude you guys do not know how much I enjoyed this book And probably for very simple reasons that others may not share but I'm not even sorry I think it was refreshing to read about an intelligent fortuitous protagonist that has a worthy goal he seeks out but has to weather some difficult circumstances in order to reach that goal Akash comes from a poor family and is actually a very smart boy who works well with the numbers in his head naturally he loves math Unfortunately with respect to the circumstances that his family lives in and a sudden tragedy that throws his world out of balance Akash uestions whether he must live the life he's fated to live or work against the elements to try to reach the goal he ultimately wants in his life His journey takes him from home in the villages to being sent away to do backbreaking labor to pay off a debt to escaping into the larger cityscapes of India and meeting a bunch of colorful characters along the way both friend and foe alike I have to say that the attention to place details as well as the customs and language of India drawn in this novel including the glossary in the back are excellent even particularly for its respective length audience middle grade and genre I flew through this book and found the narrative flow nice I didn't want to put it down and only did when I had to I do wish that I'd had time to get to know the characters and had a deeper immersion with some of the other details of the work the math tricks and the way Akash walked through them with the other characters were cool but I honestly can't complain that much I really enjoyed it and I think people who like uick reads featuring a likable protagonist and an interesting attention to detail with respect to place will find something to take from in this novel I will also say that I appreciate the author's end notes on the realities that Indian children like Akash face each day and I was able to take away uite a bit from thatOverall score 45

  2. Robert Kent Robert Kent says:

    At one point Akash the hero of Saraswati's Way is asked what it's like to read by one of many illiterate boys he meets and he replies “It’s like going to different places without leaving where you are Esteemed Reader I cannot think of a finer way to describe Saraswati’s Way to you This book is a portal to another world not often seen in American fiction the world of India through the eyes of a peasant child It’s a world that will eually tantalize and haunt youLike many Americans I’ll admit that the Ninja is woefully ignorant of other cultures and my knowledge of India comes mostly from Slumdog Millionaire Apu from The Simpsons and Karl Pilkington’s journey to the Taj Mahal on An Idiot Abroad I have Indian friends but they’ve been Americanized If you’re an American who is already very familiar with India and its culture you’re still going to love Saraswati’s Way because at its heart it’s a great story well told But for the ignorant such as myself it is fascinating to have this opportunity to learn about Indian culture and social rules wrapped around a compelling story From a craft perspective Saraswatti’s Way is a great example about how to write about setting and how the choice of setting informs every aspect of the story If you’re a science fiction writer describing other worlds or a small town Indiana boy like me writing about small town Indiana Monika Shroder is a wonderful world builder and her work is worth studying See how she delivers exposition about culture we need to know to understand the story without ever interrupting the story To even understand the title you need to know that Saraswatti is the Indian goddess of knowledge and to know the importance of religion in Indian culture To better illustrate here is what Akash's father tells him early in the story“Son you are just as willful as your mother She always wanted to change things for the better She argued even with your Dadima” Bapu shook his head slowly “Nothing changes because of our doing It’s all in the hands of the gods”And that is what twelve year old Akash is up against a stubborn belief by everyone around him that “that’s just the way it is; some things will never cha a a ange” Akash is a member of a poor farming family and it is his destiny to receive the minimum amount of education and then to become a poor farmer amassing debt he can never pay off But Akash dreams of being able to go to a proper school and to get a proper education and to rise out of the poverty he was born into If he can only get the money for a tutor he can study and perhaps earn a scholarship His family however has no intention of wasting good money on knowledge because as his grandmother most colorfully puts it Why teach a bucket to sing? He doesn’t need to go to school past seventh standard”I can’t decide whether I should compare Saraswati’s Way to a fairy tale or to the work of Charles Dickens Both would be apt comparisons and it won’t surprise me one bit to see Saraswati’s Way become a new middle grade classic as word of mouth spreads about what a fantastic book this is I would personally like to put a copy in the hands of every American child attending school and eating three meals a day because perhaps the Ninja is getting old but these kids today don’t know how lucky they are Reading about Akash’s predicament may remind themEvery August a fever comes to Akash’s village after the wet season and people die—I can’t even imagine living in a place like that At the start of the book the fever claims Akash’s father who is moved to the ground to be in contact with the earth when he dies I’m not sure what the significance of this is as it was not touched on in Karl Pilkington’s journey but it’s one of the many fascinating tidbits about Indian culture I picked up reading this book With him dead Akash’s fate is in his grandmother’s hands His death combined with a poor crop leaves the family in a terrible bind and they will soon lose their home if they cannot pay off their rent debt Thus Akash’s grandmother sends him to work in a child labor campAkash is good with numbers and he soon figures out that at the interest rate his family is being charged he will never pay off the debt He will forever be a slave without an education So Akash hops a train and sets out on his own on an adventure through India There is never a point in the story when Akash is not in conflict He is a strong protagonist with a sympathetic goal beset on all sides by the ineuities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men and yes I did just drop that Pulp Fiction reference in a blog about children’s literature This is the stuff of great storytellingI’m not sure if there is such a thing as edgy middle grade but if there is last week’s The Underneath is edgy and Saraswati’s Way certainly is Personally I’ve come to resent the term “children’s fiction” and would like to see it referred to as family fiction We have family films The main characters in ET The Extra Terrestrial are children and yet that is a “family film” loved by children and adults alike I have no doubt that Saraswati’s Way will be loved by children but Schroder clearly intends for it to be read by adults as well which would explain the inclusion of this sceneIt was tempting to go with the only person he knew in Delhi Akash had no clear idea what he would do when he arrived at the train station But Lal Singh stared at him the way a cat looked before it pounced on a mouse Akash could feel Lal Singh’s damp hand on the small of his back slowly moving closer toward his buttocksChildren may likely read right over this scene without picking up on Lal Singh’s sinister motives for inviting Akash to stay with him but adults won’t So why include it if not for adult readers? What mother could read this story and not have fear for twelve year old Akash alone on the streets of India tripled? They have nasty awful folks in India just like they do here and a child alone is a child who may be approached by predators And India doesn’t even have Chris Hansen and the crew of To Catch a Predator The inclusion of Lal Singh is dealt with uickly and the story moves on which is good because even when handsome Chris Hansen is hosting this stuff is nothing to dwell on and not what Saraswati’s Way is about Lal Singh is simply another point of conflict emphasizing how alone Akash is on his journeyLal Singh is also sigh realistic It’s not a pretty world out there Esteemed Reader and it’s no place for a child to have to survive on his own But children do it here and in even greater numbers in parts of India Akash isn’t going to tour a chocolate factory His story is meant to be real and to invoke reader sympathy for him and the other kids in India in situations similar to or worse than his I’m not going to spoil the whole book for you but Akash later gets involved with drug dealers and other nasty characters Here is a particularly poignant scene that haunts me and I think will give you a nice preview of what to expect in the darker parts of Saraswati’s Way remember all of these characters are children“What are they doing? Akash asked He noticed a sharp smell like gasoline “They are sniffing” Rohit answered“Sniffing what?”“E Raze Cor rec tion fluid” Deepak answered his voice slurred “Even cheaper than glue Same effect Ahhhh” He had lowered the rag“You want some? I have glue” Madhup offered Akash a small plastic bottle and his rag“No thank you” Akash turned to Rohit “What does it do to them?”“It makes them crazy” he answered“No it makes us happy and not hungry” Deepak called“It lets us forget things” Madhup added“After a while it ruins their brains It is very dangerous” Rohit saidBut I don’t want you to go saying “Saraswati’s Way? Some blogger said it was depressing” That’s not true Saraswati’s Way is actually a hopeful and uplifting book I’m really not going to spoil it but just trust me And as for the dark stuff You remember the end of The Color Purple when Celi finally gets to hug Netti and her son and her daughter and even Sophia is happy and it’s just the happiest scene ever and the audience cries happy tears? That scene is happy directly in proportion to how unhappy the journey of Ceili is prior to it And if you haven’t seen The Color Purple go rent itI see we are clearly out of time and yet I have one passage to share with you I’m going to keep harping on this idea for “family” books rather than “children’s” books for several posts to come but there is no reason a story about children can’t include as much complexity as a story about adults To prove it here is a symbolic passage to serve as a metaphor for the children of India that even Nathanial Hawthorne would approve ofThe pigeons continued their fight close to the edge of the roof each of them holding one end of the bread in its beak One bird spread its wings trying to lift the bread and fly but the second pigeon ripped the chapatti apart with a sudden jerk causing both of them to lose the bread The pieces fell to the courtyard below And that’s it for another week Esteemed Reader Come back on Thursday to see Monika Schroder face the 7 uestions and on Saturday to see Jennifer Laughran do the same And definitely come back next week as I’ve got the first of two big surprises planned for you And now as always I will leave you with some of my favorite passages from Saraswati’s Way Wanting was just another kind of hunger burning until satisfiedTheir bare branches ended in thick knobs held upward like the fists of angry menPain flooded Akash like blood soaking a clothThe throw of her sari covered Aunt Kamla’s face but her words shot through the fabric like a camel’s spitHeavy from exhaustion he slowly curled up like a cashewThe color and consistency of the man’s skin reminded Akash of potatoesFor an interview with author Monika Schroeder as well as interviews with other writers and literary agents check out my blog at wwwmiddlegradeninjablogspotcom

  3. Douglas Gibson Douglas Gibson says:

    In following the journey of Akash a budding young mathematician who dreams of getting into a better school than he can find in his village Schröder gives the reader a compelling and often suspenseful story of perseverance despair and faith At the same time no reader can come away unaffected by the portrait this book paints of a modern India where poverty and injustice force children into dilemmas and actions alien even to most Western adults If your test of a good book and your test of a good book for kids is whether it alters the reader's perception of the world I believe Saraswati's Way is worth a look

  4. Kristi Kristi says:

    I was really glad to see this realistic children's fiction book set in India The author obviously knows a lot about the culture and provides a glossary in the back for children reading the book who are unfamiliar with the terms Akash is twelve years old and obsessed with math It's his passion and he dearly wants to continue his schooling But his family is poor and after the death of his father he is forced to go work in a uarry to pay off the family's debt But Akash won't stay He sees the ledger with the amount they are paid the amount they owe and the interest rates He's good enough with numbers to know that the debt will never be paid off He runs away and lives on the street in Delhi This book follows his life on the street and how he tries to get schooling so that he may continue to learn math The plight of many of the street children in Delhi is presented with delicacy and honesty A good multicultural story

  5. Edward Sullivan Edward Sullivan says:

    A moving inspiring story about a young Indian boy determined to improve his lot in life Many details about Indian society and Hinduism are adeptly woven into the story to make for a rich flavorful novel

  6. Inoli Inoli says:

    The writing was simple and straightforward but still well done I rounded up but I would definitely recommend it

  7. Ruby Ruby says:

    Monika Schröder who’s a German based writer came to India and got fascinated by the Indian culture Perhaps because she’s been working as an elementary school teacher for children she keeps in love with children’s fiction Saraswati’s Way is her book that she came up with to establish a ray of hope especially amongst children who are exposed to harsh realities at the very early age tarnishing their dreams However the book is as eually an encouraging read for adults as it should be for children of any age and any socio economic backgrounds Akash is a 12 year old scholar child who loves numbers and wishes to earn a higher scholarship so that he could afford to study further and eventually build an esteemed future for his family and himself He soon realises that dreams are usually trickier to achieve and realities are tyrannical for families that are agricultural labourers in India Throughout his journey from being sold as a slave to Kumar Ji the lender to becoming a jovial assistant to Yogesh the juice stand owner at New Delhi railway station the young Akash bares conviction Despite being exposed to the ineuities of the selfish world he continues to win over his internal conflicts He keeps fighting to choose between selling drugs to earn uicker money and getting admission in one of the best schools and he wins over by choosing the latter eventually Saraswati’s Way is an inspiring tale of a young child who at the end chooses to follow what his white part of soul preaches The book is certainly an entertaining compelling read that gives hope that you can achieve your dreams with determination courage and some luck against all odds as the writer herself says—she successfully has instituted her point Nevertheless I personally have some uestions to the writer Why do we often portray India in such light to the World? Why is that the authors often believe that living in slum and coming out victorious is the only struggle that Indian children could go through? Be it Slumdog Millionaire though I haven’t read the A yet or Saraswati’s Way the authors and film makers document Indian slums the Are not there other sort of mental moral social political and family weights that Indian children face? I mean do not Indian children have to go through such as depression molestation competition or peer pressure humiliation based on race body shaming and so many ? Are there any good booksstories on such issues? If yes do recommend

  8. Faith Huff Faith Huff says:

    With a uick pace and a hero you want to cheer for Saraswati's Way makes for an immersive experience Taking place in India Akash's story is a powerful overview of some of the issues rampant in India especially those of child labor and the dangers of children living on the streets in the cities It's the perfect novel for helping students understand the experiences of someone in their age group on the other side of the world especially one who wants than anything to gain access to education which so many of my own students don't appreciate Walking with Akash through his journey we see him choose the right path which is rarely the easy one and find his way to his dreams The author also includes a note in the back discussing the personal experiences in India that led to the inspiration of this novel and some websites to check out if you're interested in helping out children like Akash

  9. Ariana Ariana says:

    As a middle schooler I think that Saraswati's Way has a great lesson for not only kids my age but everyone It teaches that patience and hardwork is the key to success This story about a young boy who goes through the death of his father after already losing his mother is a good topic to write about especially when it comes to teaching about loss It also shows his journey to getting in to a better school to grow his learning It talks about believing in yourself and being patient along with having bravery It is an amazing book for all ages and has some very good twists and interesting moments in the book I would definitely recommend

  10. Tara Ethridge Tara Ethridge says:

    Very interesting and slightly intense book about a boy in India that has a terrible life and then escapes to New Delhi to try and find a better life He lives in the train station and ekes out a small living helping a magazine seller but he is very smart and talented in math and longs to go to a school where he can shine Lots of twists and turns and some very poor decision making along the way but the story is heartwarming and loads to talk about in this book Reminded me of The Bridge Home and Amal Unbound

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