Confinement ePUB Þ Paperback

Confinement ePUB Þ Paperback

Confinement [Reading] ➷ Confinement By Carrie Brown – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk A refugee from Vienna and World War II Arthur Henning now has a comfortable new life as a chauffeur for a banker and his family in the suburbs of New York One day he is ordered to drive Aggie the daug A refugee from Vienna and World War II Arthur Henning now has a comfortable new life as a chauffeur for a banker and his family in the suburbs of New York One day he is ordered to drive Aggie the daughter to a home for unwed mothers The family's decision to give the baby away shocks Arthur profoundly He watched Agatha grow up; he cannot obey and leave her alone with her fate As his bond with her develops Arthur wakes from his own emotional slumber and discovers within his own Confinement freedom.


10 thoughts on “Confinement

  1. Sarah Sarah says:

    The premise of the book was great but the story was extremely slow and boring From the write up I was expecting deeper emotional attachment to the characters I found I didn't really care what happened to any of the characters and some of the important facts were barely mentionedAggie and Toby's relationship was hardly brought up and it was a major part of the story line


  2. Sammy Sammy says:

    Okay yeah the book was good But I just had some issues with it I thought the writing was lovely and both Aggie and Arthur who I saw as the books main protagonists were both developed into nice believeable charactersOther than that I didn't enjoy the book that much I'm going to repeat once again that I have an issue with an unclear timeframe in a book It's okay if you jump back and forth but if you don't make it clear I get pissed off Also length of time if too much happens in such a short space of time I just don't believe it and I'm gone Like with Arthur's visits to Aggie he only went three times yet it was written out to seem that he visited her practically every weekend until the baby was born YeahI thought that the issue of the persecution of the Jews was touched on nicely Not so much as it happened but of a reflection on what happened in Arthur's life and how he remembers it and later reflects on it Also how it affects him and his sonI had a problem with the relationship between Aggie and Toby You find out early on in the book that Toby is Aggie's baby's daddy so I'm not giving anything away here But we only maybe see them together once or twice when they're older but loads of time together when they were younger perhaps though that was Carrie Brown's intent Arthur kept seeing these two as young children Not the grown man and woman they were becoming so maybe that's how we were supposed to see them as well Who knows all I know is I wanted to see their relationship a little Just so you know I read an Advanced Edition of the book so I don't know how much has changed from this book to the released book With the exception of a few spellinggrammar errors I don't see much else changing though Overall the book was okay I'm tired boo


  3. Heather Heather says:

    No thank you I received this book for Christmas; it is not one I would have picked up myself For the most part I thought the book was interesting It does bounce all over the place past present and back againThe thing that just killed it for me though is the whole 'old guy being in love with the young girl' He was 36 when he came to the family and she was 9 the same age as his son So the kids grow up together and by the time she's a teenage this old guy is in love with her YUCK I'm 37 and my boys are 9 and so are their friends and it's just GROSS I couldn't get over that How do you fall in love with your kid's friends? Wrong wrong wrongHad that whole part been left out I would have rated it higher But it was there and it just ruined it for me


  4. Rebecca Meyers Rebecca Meyers says:

    I liked this book Nothing nothing less really Particularly liked the main character and I do enjoy Carrie Brown as an author and have read some of her other books as well


  5. Brenda Hicks Brenda Hicks says:

    I enjoyed reading this book for its craft almost as much as I enjoyed the story Love passion loss and heartbreak in all its forms written beautifully by Carrie Brown It was written as people talk and think jumbled togetherone thought leading to another as you wind through Arthur's present and past uite literally in the space of one week I so wish I could have sat in on Carrie's long and fruitful conversations with Jennifer Brice about storytelling Whatever their content they got it right This book is exactly how people remember Things remind us of things People we love trauma we suffer haunt us like spectors We remember odd things tiny details that make no sense And the things we remember color our present pop up unannounced in our thoughts of now This is the foundation behind the idea of life as a tapestry The way you respond to life the things you consciously and subconsciously choose for yourself are wrapped up in the events of yesterday Thank you Ms Brown for taking me on this mind trip I loved itevery heartbreaking sorrowful chest thumping moment


  6. Kelly Wagner Kelly Wagner says:

    A couple years ago I had a book of lists of books to try on a bunch of subjects in alphabetical order As a means to try and read stuff outside my usual range I picked two of the topics one from near the beginning of the book and one from near the end This is one of the half dozen books from the Adoption category This is the 3rd one I've gotten around to reading and the third one I haven't been particularly enthused about It's a story really about how people never really talk to each other how people keep secrets and how the rich are very different I get really frustrated by people who never do say what they mean never do work out their problems I will keep trying to tackle the rest of the books I picked out but mostly they are confirming that I like my genre fiction my murder mysteries and science fiction a lot better than hauntingly beautiful stories that are supposed to be tragic and then a heartwarming bit at the end Ugh Well enough written but not for me


  7. K K says:

    Slowly this novel grabs you Several issues entwined WWII Austrian refugees trusting that surely everyone knows what's right and just interior turmoil tamped down to such a point that they don't know when to stand up for themselves or those they love Familial relationships examined w several challenges Appreciation for small things lack of entitlement and expression of love on so many levels All these things woven into a story that's leaves a reader w much to contemplate If there's a fault it lies w the main characters being too fair too smart beyond their years too loving


  8. Barb Barb says:

    I liked this novel it's different from what I usually read I generally choose historical fiction and historical mysteries While some of the period covered in this story is historical fiction the time frame spans from 1939 to 1963 I don't generally consider the 1960s historical fictionThis story revolves around the relationship between Arthur Hemming and Agatha Duvall Arthur is an Austrian Jew hired through the Hebrew Aide Society by Lee Duvall Agatha's father as a chauffeur In 1946 Arthur and his eight year old son Toby come to America from London where his wife and infant daughter were killed in a bombing attack on the city during the warThe Duvalls are wealthy and dysfunctional the father cool and unemotional the mother a selfish alcoholic their daughter Agatha is the same age as Arthur's son Toby Agatha finds comfort and stability within the normalcy of the Hemming's family lifeWhen Agatha is seventeen years old Arthur is instructed to drive her to a home for unwed mothers where Agatha will be giving her baby up for adoption Arthur cannot understand the Duvall's decision to send their grandchild away He struggles with their demands and makes choices for himself that risk his position as their employeeI wish I had read this with my book club book because there are so many interesting issues to talk about I'd like to discuss this book further without worrying about spoiling it for potential readersI will say I enjoyed the characters Agatha and Arthur and their relationship and I liked the author's resolution to the story I did find one theme a little overly done and could have enjoyed less biblical references but at the same time they were appropriate in the context of the story I think Carrie Brown is a talented author the uality of her writing reminds me of Elizabeth Burg who does emotion so well I'm looking forward to reading Brown's 'The Hatbox Baby' I would recommend this to book clubs who know that none of their readers have given up a child for adoption I think this would be a painful book to read for women who have endured anything similar to Agatha's experience


  9. Marvin Marvin says:

    What a touching book A blurb on the back says of her earlier book Lamb in Love Brown writes with a tremendous affection for her characters That's certainly true again here It would be easy to pass judgment on these characters for their faulty judgments timidity; instead we struggle right along with them as they face difficult choices The main character is an Austrian Jew forced out of Vienna along with his wife son by the Nazi invasion His wife new baby daughter die during the London bombings he his son eventually find refuge on the estate of a wealthy couple outside New York City He becomes something of a surrogate father to the couple's daughter about the same age as his son The daughter becomes pregnant at age 17 is sent off to a house for unwed mothers to give the baby up for adoption Arthur is tormented by the choice but unable to summon the wisdom courage to alter the course of events Throughout the book he is tormented comforted advised by dreams daytime visions of a fellow Jew he witnessed suffering a beating in Vienna as the Nazis arrived The visions are occasionally accompanied by reflections on God until late in the book after the Viennese doctor appears several times alongside his grandson then disappears Where are you? Arthur asked the empty bus Speak to me But the doctor never answered any than God had ever answered 334 Arthur minded Dr Ornstein's disappearance from his life than God's Of God he had never been certain anyway but at least he knew Dr Ornstein had been real had lived once had known what it meant to have a man's heart to play his fingers over the keys of his beautiful piano to touch the mysterious wounds of his patients 323 A profoundly moving rich novel of love longing for what's just out of one's reach


  10. Bill Glose Bill Glose says:

    Arthur Henning is a Jew who left Austria for England at the outset of World War II After losing his home to the Nazis he then loses his wife and daughter in one of the raids during the Battle of Britain When the war ends he immigrates to America with his surviving son where he becomes the chauffeur of a rich businessmanEven after Henning starts a new life in America he continues to suffer throughout the story enduring all his hardships with stoic grace He is a man of dignity and honor who expects little out of life and gets exactly what he expects Having experienced so much loss already he now lives confined by the fear of losing anything else Too scared to do anything but follow orders he stands by passively while those he loves are harmed along with himWhen Henning happens upon the grandson he allowed to be given up for adoption he starts to uestion everything he’s done or to the point NOT done He ponders his life in a series of flashbacks while working up the courage to make amends to those who have paid for his inaction The reader is kept in suspense not knowing whether or not Henning will dare to take a risk until the final few paragraphs In this wonderfully crafted book Brown achieves the most difficult task of getting the reader to care for an indecisive hero


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 thoughts on “Confinement

  1. Sarah Sarah says:

    The premise of the book was great but the story was extremely slow and boring From the write up I was expecting deeper emotional attachment to the characters I found I didn't really care what happened to any of the characters and some of the important facts were barely mentionedAggie and Toby's relationship was hardly brought up and it was a major part of the story line

  2. Sammy Sammy says:

    Okay yeah the book was good But I just had some issues with it I thought the writing was lovely and both Aggie and Arthur who I saw as the books main protagonists were both developed into nice believeable charactersOther than that I didn't enjoy the book that much I'm going to repeat once again that I have an issue with an unclear timeframe in a book It's okay if you jump back and forth but if you don't make it clear I get pissed off Also length of time if too much happens in such a short space of time I just don't believe it and I'm gone Like with Arthur's visits to Aggie he only went three times yet it was written out to seem that he visited her practically every weekend until the baby was born YeahI thought that the issue of the persecution of the Jews was touched on nicely Not so much as it happened but of a reflection on what happened in Arthur's life and how he remembers it and later reflects on it Also how it affects him and his sonI had a problem with the relationship between Aggie and Toby You find out early on in the book that Toby is Aggie's baby's daddy so I'm not giving anything away here But we only maybe see them together once or twice when they're older but loads of time together when they were younger perhaps though that was Carrie Brown's intent Arthur kept seeing these two as young children Not the grown man and woman they were becoming so maybe that's how we were supposed to see them as well Who knows all I know is I wanted to see their relationship a little Just so you know I read an Advanced Edition of the book so I don't know how much has changed from this book to the released book With the exception of a few spellinggrammar errors I don't see much else changing though Overall the book was okay I'm tired boo

  3. Heather Heather says:

    No thank you I received this book for Christmas; it is not one I would have picked up myself For the most part I thought the book was interesting It does bounce all over the place past present and back againThe thing that just killed it for me though is the whole 'old guy being in love with the young girl' He was 36 when he came to the family and she was 9 the same age as his son So the kids grow up together and by the time she's a teenage this old guy is in love with her YUCK I'm 37 and my boys are 9 and so are their friends and it's just GROSS I couldn't get over that How do you fall in love with your kid's friends? Wrong wrong wrongHad that whole part been left out I would have rated it higher But it was there and it just ruined it for me

  4. Rebecca Meyers Rebecca Meyers says:

    I liked this book Nothing nothing less really Particularly liked the main character and I do enjoy Carrie Brown as an author and have read some of her other books as well

  5. Brenda Hicks Brenda Hicks says:

    I enjoyed reading this book for its craft almost as much as I enjoyed the story Love passion loss and heartbreak in all its forms written beautifully by Carrie Brown It was written as people talk and think jumbled togetherone thought leading to another as you wind through Arthur's present and past uite literally in the space of one week I so wish I could have sat in on Carrie's long and fruitful conversations with Jennifer Brice about storytelling Whatever their content they got it right This book is exactly how people remember Things remind us of things People we love trauma we suffer haunt us like spectors We remember odd things tiny details that make no sense And the things we remember color our present pop up unannounced in our thoughts of now This is the foundation behind the idea of life as a tapestry The way you respond to life the things you consciously and subconsciously choose for yourself are wrapped up in the events of yesterday Thank you Ms Brown for taking me on this mind trip I loved itevery heartbreaking sorrowful chest thumping moment

  6. Kelly Wagner Kelly Wagner says:

    A couple years ago I had a book of lists of books to try on a bunch of subjects in alphabetical order As a means to try and read stuff outside my usual range I picked two of the topics one from near the beginning of the book and one from near the end This is one of the half dozen books from the Adoption category This is the 3rd one I've gotten around to reading and the third one I haven't been particularly enthused about It's a story really about how people never really talk to each other how people keep secrets and how the rich are very different I get really frustrated by people who never do say what they mean never do work out their problems I will keep trying to tackle the rest of the books I picked out but mostly they are confirming that I like my genre fiction my murder mysteries and science fiction a lot better than hauntingly beautiful stories that are supposed to be tragic and then a heartwarming bit at the end Ugh Well enough written but not for me

  7. K K says:

    Slowly this novel grabs you Several issues entwined WWII Austrian refugees trusting that surely everyone knows what's right and just interior turmoil tamped down to such a point that they don't know when to stand up for themselves or those they love Familial relationships examined w several challenges Appreciation for small things lack of entitlement and expression of love on so many levels All these things woven into a story that's leaves a reader w much to contemplate If there's a fault it lies w the main characters being too fair too smart beyond their years too loving

  8. Barb Barb says:

    I liked this novel it's different from what I usually read I generally choose historical fiction and historical mysteries While some of the period covered in this story is historical fiction the time frame spans from 1939 to 1963 I don't generally consider the 1960s historical fictionThis story revolves around the relationship between Arthur Hemming and Agatha Duvall Arthur is an Austrian Jew hired through the Hebrew Aide Society by Lee Duvall Agatha's father as a chauffeur In 1946 Arthur and his eight year old son Toby come to America from London where his wife and infant daughter were killed in a bombing attack on the city during the warThe Duvalls are wealthy and dysfunctional the father cool and unemotional the mother a selfish alcoholic their daughter Agatha is the same age as Arthur's son Toby Agatha finds comfort and stability within the normalcy of the Hemming's family lifeWhen Agatha is seventeen years old Arthur is instructed to drive her to a home for unwed mothers where Agatha will be giving her baby up for adoption Arthur cannot understand the Duvall's decision to send their grandchild away He struggles with their demands and makes choices for himself that risk his position as their employeeI wish I had read this with my book club book because there are so many interesting issues to talk about I'd like to discuss this book further without worrying about spoiling it for potential readersI will say I enjoyed the characters Agatha and Arthur and their relationship and I liked the author's resolution to the story I did find one theme a little overly done and could have enjoyed less biblical references but at the same time they were appropriate in the context of the story I think Carrie Brown is a talented author the uality of her writing reminds me of Elizabeth Burg who does emotion so well I'm looking forward to reading Brown's 'The Hatbox Baby' I would recommend this to book clubs who know that none of their readers have given up a child for adoption I think this would be a painful book to read for women who have endured anything similar to Agatha's experience

  9. Marvin Marvin says:

    What a touching book A blurb on the back says of her earlier book Lamb in Love Brown writes with a tremendous affection for her characters That's certainly true again here It would be easy to pass judgment on these characters for their faulty judgments timidity; instead we struggle right along with them as they face difficult choices The main character is an Austrian Jew forced out of Vienna along with his wife son by the Nazi invasion His wife new baby daughter die during the London bombings he his son eventually find refuge on the estate of a wealthy couple outside New York City He becomes something of a surrogate father to the couple's daughter about the same age as his son The daughter becomes pregnant at age 17 is sent off to a house for unwed mothers to give the baby up for adoption Arthur is tormented by the choice but unable to summon the wisdom courage to alter the course of events Throughout the book he is tormented comforted advised by dreams daytime visions of a fellow Jew he witnessed suffering a beating in Vienna as the Nazis arrived The visions are occasionally accompanied by reflections on God until late in the book after the Viennese doctor appears several times alongside his grandson then disappears Where are you? Arthur asked the empty bus Speak to me But the doctor never answered any than God had ever answered 334 Arthur minded Dr Ornstein's disappearance from his life than God's Of God he had never been certain anyway but at least he knew Dr Ornstein had been real had lived once had known what it meant to have a man's heart to play his fingers over the keys of his beautiful piano to touch the mysterious wounds of his patients 323 A profoundly moving rich novel of love longing for what's just out of one's reach

  10. Bill Glose Bill Glose says:

    Arthur Henning is a Jew who left Austria for England at the outset of World War II After losing his home to the Nazis he then loses his wife and daughter in one of the raids during the Battle of Britain When the war ends he immigrates to America with his surviving son where he becomes the chauffeur of a rich businessmanEven after Henning starts a new life in America he continues to suffer throughout the story enduring all his hardships with stoic grace He is a man of dignity and honor who expects little out of life and gets exactly what he expects Having experienced so much loss already he now lives confined by the fear of losing anything else Too scared to do anything but follow orders he stands by passively while those he loves are harmed along with himWhen Henning happens upon the grandson he allowed to be given up for adoption he starts to uestion everything he’s done or to the point NOT done He ponders his life in a series of flashbacks while working up the courage to make amends to those who have paid for his inaction The reader is kept in suspense not knowing whether or not Henning will dare to take a risk until the final few paragraphs In this wonderfully crafted book Brown achieves the most difficult task of getting the reader to care for an indecisive hero

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *