Μήδεια / Ἱππόλυτος / Ἠλέκτρα /

Μήδεια / Ἱππόλυτος / Ἠλέκτρα /

Μήδεια / Ἱππόλυτος / Ἠλέκτρα / Ἑλένη [PDF / Epub] ☉ Μήδεια / Ἱππόλυτος / Ἠλέκτρα / Ἑλένη Author Euripides – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Euripides was one of the most popular and controversial of all Greek tragedians and his plays are marked by an independence of thought ingenious dramatic devices and a subtle variety of register and m Euripides was one of the most Ἱππόλυτος / Kindle ´ popular and controversial of all Greek Μήδεια / Kindle - tragedians and his plays are marked by an independence of thought ingenious dramatic / Ἱππόλυτος / ePUB ´ devices and a subtle variety of register and mood He is also remarkable / Ἱππόλυτος / Ἠλέκτρα / MOBI :Þ for the prominence he gave to female characters whether heroines of virtue or vice This new translation does full justice to Euripides's range of tone and gift of narrative A lucid introduction provides substantial analysis of each play complete with vital explanations of the traditions and background to Euripides's worldContains Medea; Hippolytus; Electra; Helen.


10 thoughts on “Μήδεια / Ἱππόλυτος / Ἠλέκτρα / Ἑλένη

  1. Joy Joy says:

    Review for just the Medea in this collectionOverall a great take on Medea's story My usual complaint with plays is crazy jargon but I liked how James Morwood's translation made the text pretty easy to understand I wasn't so caught up on trying to understand every single word I could really just enjoy reading the play And after reading about Euripides's version of Medea I found that I actually liked this story better than Apollonius of Rhodes's Jason and the Golden Fleece 35


  2. Jasmine Jasmine says:

    Of everything that is alive and has a mind we women are the most wretched creatures First of all we have to buy a husband with a vast outlay of money we have to take a master for our body The latter is still painful than the former And here lies the most critical issue whether we take a good husband or a bad For divorce brings shame on a woman's reputation and we cannot refuse a husband his rightsI would rather stand three times in the battle line than bear one child Medea 230 51 Medea by Eugène Delacroix Musée des Beaux Arts Lille France wikiArtorg This kind of speech outraged the Christian writer Origen who criticised Euripides for inappropriately making women express argumentative opinions Contra Celsum 73634 6; in 'Frogs' Euripides claimed to have made tragedy ' democratic' by keeping his women young ones and old ones talking alongside their masters 498 50Until recently critics were debating whether Euripides was a misogynist or a feminist But the only certainties are that he repeatedly chose to create strong female characters and that as a dramatist he had a relativist rhetorical capacity for putting both sides of the argument in the sex war From the introduction by Edith Hall p xxvixxvii


  3. Crystal Crystal says:

    this play made me stressed because Jason is the dumbest piece of shit in greek antiuity if i had the chance i would punt homeboy into the sun Medea on the other hand is haunting and powerful and wild and remains one of the most enduringly ambiguous figures in Greek tragedy for me Condemnation of Medea is something i will forever yell about homegirl transcends her feminine character confinements and enters this wild androgynous space where she's both ruthless and logical but also emotional and maternal so audiences can't even hate her?? plus she's literally just using the revenge logic that male heroes use for everything suck on that Aristophanesalso she's the ultimate inversion of the helper maiden trope where princesses betray their kingdoms for some random hero and help him do whatever and then once they escape the hero ditches the princess on some island what up ariadne because the fact that the girl has had some part in the dude's success undermines the c l a s s i c ualities of independent strength and valor god forbid a woman in greek antiuity proves to be actually useful you can always count on men to be afraid of power in the hands of a woman and thats the tea


  4. Katie Katie says:

    6th March 2018 Have only read Medea at this point for MA thesis but will likely go back and finish this volume This want to ensure I have correct translation logged An absolutely fascinating play and I cannot wait to track its late seventeenth eighteenth century adaptations and representations


  5. Paul Paul says:

    Finally finished it Four plays in one book Having previously read Medea I just read Hippolytus Electra and Helen The first two are typical Greek tragedy fare Hippolytus Goddess makes step mother fall in love with step son; step son repulsed; step mother tells husband that step son has raped her then commits suicide Husband brings about death of son by use of wild bull from the sea Electra Mother murders father children murder motherI probably enjoyed Helen the most The play follows an alternative tradition to the famous account of Helen of Troy In this version Helen does not elope to Troy with Paris Rather she spends the duration of the Trojan War in Egypt The Helen that goes to Troy is actually a phantom created by Hera the wife of Zeus InterestingI’m going to read Virgil’s Aeneid next I may be some time


  6. Samantha Kilford Samantha Kilford says:

    Ok but Medea riding off in the sky with the bodies of her dead children in Helios' golden chariot pulled by dragons is easily the most badass exit to ever exist


  7. Holly Holly says:

    Short and sweetMedea you think you can cheat on me? ME?Hippolytus I am the most virtuous man ever to have lived and nothing anyone says will prove othersElectra Euripides throwing shade for 2000 yearsHelen but have you considered not being a dick?Medea was a damn STRUGGLE because Jason is the most stubborn pig headed fuck weasel to have ever existed and I spent the entire time having to put the book down and practice some intense zen level master meditation so I didn't hurl it across the fucking room Medea herself is such a beautifully complex and delicious character that watch me call any future children after her Her ascension above men above gender above any and all stereotypes of women is revolutionary Her use of poison as the archetypal women's weapon paired with the sword archetypal male's just lifted her above all vengeful women across the literary world and made her into this incredible untouchable figure whom BABE I WOULD DIE FOR The two speeches she gives are so gut wrenching I don't have the capable vocabulary to express the depth and brilliance of them All the men in the play are fuck witsHippolytus Oh Phaedra Phaedra my dear sweet love I mean I know Hippolytus was a dick and your husband historically also apparently NOT GREAT and I too would want to take revenge on the slimy toad but I'm not sure leaving such a letter was the best way to go Morally it was bad bUT ALSO WAS IT?? I mean he didn't deserve to be killed in the way he was maybe? considering he did nothing but scorn your love which was thrust upon you by Aphrodite's meddling but eh I don't know I need to discuss this with someone to see how I feel about her actions Anyway moral of the story is all Euripidian men are wankersIn Electra I love how much Euripides threw shade God bless you God fucking bless you man I wasn't as in love with this story nor as intrigued by it as the previous two and in a collection of plays with some unbelievably complex three dimensional women there had to be one that was the weaker and for me this is it I love that Electra spent a good page effectively calling the old man and idiot over and over again because only a moron would look at a piece of cloth and be like GASP THIS MUST BE MY BROTHERS unless you know she made it herself and every part of it was totally uniue but we know that didn't happen but later she wasn't as smart as she could have been and the conclusion to her and Orestes story was pretty heartbreakingyelling H EL E N This felt so much like this was a contemporary version of the Helen of Troy we all know and hate So many superb points were raised in this So much excellence and just kisses fingers MWAH Helen who was used as a literal play thing of the gods who's name was thrown around in order to start a 10 year long war of utter decimation They literally made ghost versions of Helen that they shipped across Greece so that they could have a beauty competition and if that doesn't tell you all you need to know about how fickle and careless of humanity the gods could be then I don't know pal the greeks ain't for u Also surprise Menelaos is a wanker


  8. Harry Harry says:

    I've already written my thoughts down for my personal use but I do have one thing to sayHippolytus is a volcel icon the people that reject Aphrodite and her tricks the better


  9. Jordan LeMasonry Jordan LeMasonry says:

    Euripides is I think it's safe to say the strongest of the three Ancient Greek tragedians I don't doubt for a minute that Aeschylus enjoyed success with Prometheus Bound and Sophocles with Antigone or Oedipus Rex but I feel that Euripides is the only one of the three to truly realise human potential and what it means to be human in a world populated by malevolent gods In Electra we see a young woman burdened by the expectations to produce children and obey her husband simultaneously grieving over her father's murder at the hands of her mother and the prolonged absence of her brother Euripides however takes a tragedy already perfected by Aeschylus and Sophocles and makes it his own by allowing Electra and Orestes to struggle together rather than apart and reducing the plot's central characters to just those reuired Hippolytus presents a flawlessly presented example of Tragedy at its finest when it is unavoidable Hippolytus virgin son of Theseus suffers terribly at the hands of his father after it is erroneously revealed that he has been having an affair with his step mother Phaedra It is in Hippolytus that Euripides' world really comes to life as from the outset the audience knows that Aphrodite is causing such lust in Phaedra but Artemis Hippolytus' protector does nothing to aid him Thus the protagonists are all doomed on the whim of a goddess who is jaded simply because she isn't appreciated enoughHelen on the other hand presents a starkly different take on the Ancient World insinuating that Helen herself had nothing to do with the Trojan War and that it was simply a phantom who accompanied Paris to Troy Admittedly not his own invention Euripides nonetheless channels such energy and vigour into his interpretation of the Helen mythology as to make Helen my favourite of the plays listed here Comical and rewarding yet still tragic in force the play shows that it is uite possible for people and women at that to enjoy successful lives in the Ancient WorldAs I have said before Tragedy is far accessible than Comedy and Euripides proves that even now two and a half millennia following his death his plays are still topical informative and revolutionary; he was a feminist a sophist an idealist and when he needed to be an atheist In my humble opinion Euripides was way ahead of his time


  10. Ted Ted says:

    euripides is of course wonderful and the four plays in this volume hippolyta electra and helen are included as well are all lovely but the translation and the edition are horrid i know nothing about translating from ancient greek into english but i do know good english when i read it and there's little to be found here james morwood's prose translation is filled with tired phrasing and cliches which drag down the dynamic subject matter worse are the notes at the end of the book to which a liberal supply of in text asterisks point roughly half of morwood's notes are insulting to the reader's intelligence pointing out overarching themes explaining the meaning of common english words and interpreting the actions and thoughts of the characters this is especially annoying given that the other half of the notes which provide historical background and cultural context are useful it took me two plays to figure out which notes to check and which ones not too an effort that truly wasn't worth itreturnreturni'm going to try and find a verse translation of euripides and try again in a few years i would strongly recommend not reading this edition


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10 thoughts on “Μήδεια / Ἱππόλυτος / Ἠλέκτρα / Ἑλένη

  1. Joy Joy says:

    Review for just the Medea in this collectionOverall a great take on Medea's story My usual complaint with plays is crazy jargon but I liked how James Morwood's translation made the text pretty easy to understand I wasn't so caught up on trying to understand every single word I could really just enjoy reading the play And after reading about Euripides's version of Medea I found that I actually liked this story better than Apollonius of Rhodes's Jason and the Golden Fleece 35

  2. Jasmine Jasmine says:

    Of everything that is alive and has a mind we women are the most wretched creatures First of all we have to buy a husband with a vast outlay of money we have to take a master for our body The latter is still painful than the former And here lies the most critical issue whether we take a good husband or a bad For divorce brings shame on a woman's reputation and we cannot refuse a husband his rightsI would rather stand three times in the battle line than bear one child Medea 230 51 Medea by Eugène Delacroix Musée des Beaux Arts Lille France wikiArtorg This kind of speech outraged the Christian writer Origen who criticised Euripides for inappropriately making women express argumentative opinions Contra Celsum 73634 6; in 'Frogs' Euripides claimed to have made tragedy ' democratic' by keeping his women young ones and old ones talking alongside their masters 498 50Until recently critics were debating whether Euripides was a misogynist or a feminist But the only certainties are that he repeatedly chose to create strong female characters and that as a dramatist he had a relativist rhetorical capacity for putting both sides of the argument in the sex war From the introduction by Edith Hall p xxvixxvii

  3. Crystal Crystal says:

    this play made me stressed because Jason is the dumbest piece of shit in greek antiuity if i had the chance i would punt homeboy into the sun Medea on the other hand is haunting and powerful and wild and remains one of the most enduringly ambiguous figures in Greek tragedy for me Condemnation of Medea is something i will forever yell about homegirl transcends her feminine character confinements and enters this wild androgynous space where she's both ruthless and logical but also emotional and maternal so audiences can't even hate her?? plus she's literally just using the revenge logic that male heroes use for everything suck on that Aristophanesalso she's the ultimate inversion of the helper maiden trope where princesses betray their kingdoms for some random hero and help him do whatever and then once they escape the hero ditches the princess on some island what up ariadne because the fact that the girl has had some part in the dude's success undermines the c l a s s i c ualities of independent strength and valor god forbid a woman in greek antiuity proves to be actually useful you can always count on men to be afraid of power in the hands of a woman and thats the tea

  4. Katie Katie says:

    6th March 2018 Have only read Medea at this point for MA thesis but will likely go back and finish this volume This want to ensure I have correct translation logged An absolutely fascinating play and I cannot wait to track its late seventeenth eighteenth century adaptations and representations

  5. Paul Paul says:

    Finally finished it Four plays in one book Having previously read Medea I just read Hippolytus Electra and Helen The first two are typical Greek tragedy fare Hippolytus Goddess makes step mother fall in love with step son; step son repulsed; step mother tells husband that step son has raped her then commits suicide Husband brings about death of son by use of wild bull from the sea Electra Mother murders father children murder motherI probably enjoyed Helen the most The play follows an alternative tradition to the famous account of Helen of Troy In this version Helen does not elope to Troy with Paris Rather she spends the duration of the Trojan War in Egypt The Helen that goes to Troy is actually a phantom created by Hera the wife of Zeus InterestingI’m going to read Virgil’s Aeneid next I may be some time

  6. Samantha Kilford Samantha Kilford says:

    Ok but Medea riding off in the sky with the bodies of her dead children in Helios' golden chariot pulled by dragons is easily the most badass exit to ever exist

  7. Holly Holly says:

    Short and sweetMedea you think you can cheat on me? ME?Hippolytus I am the most virtuous man ever to have lived and nothing anyone says will prove othersElectra Euripides throwing shade for 2000 yearsHelen but have you considered not being a dick?Medea was a damn STRUGGLE because Jason is the most stubborn pig headed fuck weasel to have ever existed and I spent the entire time having to put the book down and practice some intense zen level master meditation so I didn't hurl it across the fucking room Medea herself is such a beautifully complex and delicious character that watch me call any future children after her Her ascension above men above gender above any and all stereotypes of women is revolutionary Her use of poison as the archetypal women's weapon paired with the sword archetypal male's just lifted her above all vengeful women across the literary world and made her into this incredible untouchable figure whom BABE I WOULD DIE FOR The two speeches she gives are so gut wrenching I don't have the capable vocabulary to express the depth and brilliance of them All the men in the play are fuck witsHippolytus Oh Phaedra Phaedra my dear sweet love I mean I know Hippolytus was a dick and your husband historically also apparently NOT GREAT and I too would want to take revenge on the slimy toad but I'm not sure leaving such a letter was the best way to go Morally it was bad bUT ALSO WAS IT?? I mean he didn't deserve to be killed in the way he was maybe? considering he did nothing but scorn your love which was thrust upon you by Aphrodite's meddling but eh I don't know I need to discuss this with someone to see how I feel about her actions Anyway moral of the story is all Euripidian men are wankersIn Electra I love how much Euripides threw shade God bless you God fucking bless you man I wasn't as in love with this story nor as intrigued by it as the previous two and in a collection of plays with some unbelievably complex three dimensional women there had to be one that was the weaker and for me this is it I love that Electra spent a good page effectively calling the old man and idiot over and over again because only a moron would look at a piece of cloth and be like GASP THIS MUST BE MY BROTHERS unless you know she made it herself and every part of it was totally uniue but we know that didn't happen but later she wasn't as smart as she could have been and the conclusion to her and Orestes story was pretty heartbreakingyelling H EL E N This felt so much like this was a contemporary version of the Helen of Troy we all know and hate So many superb points were raised in this So much excellence and just kisses fingers MWAH Helen who was used as a literal play thing of the gods who's name was thrown around in order to start a 10 year long war of utter decimation They literally made ghost versions of Helen that they shipped across Greece so that they could have a beauty competition and if that doesn't tell you all you need to know about how fickle and careless of humanity the gods could be then I don't know pal the greeks ain't for u Also surprise Menelaos is a wanker

  8. Harry Harry says:

    I've already written my thoughts down for my personal use but I do have one thing to sayHippolytus is a volcel icon the people that reject Aphrodite and her tricks the better

  9. Jordan LeMasonry Jordan LeMasonry says:

    Euripides is I think it's safe to say the strongest of the three Ancient Greek tragedians I don't doubt for a minute that Aeschylus enjoyed success with Prometheus Bound and Sophocles with Antigone or Oedipus Rex but I feel that Euripides is the only one of the three to truly realise human potential and what it means to be human in a world populated by malevolent gods In Electra we see a young woman burdened by the expectations to produce children and obey her husband simultaneously grieving over her father's murder at the hands of her mother and the prolonged absence of her brother Euripides however takes a tragedy already perfected by Aeschylus and Sophocles and makes it his own by allowing Electra and Orestes to struggle together rather than apart and reducing the plot's central characters to just those reuired Hippolytus presents a flawlessly presented example of Tragedy at its finest when it is unavoidable Hippolytus virgin son of Theseus suffers terribly at the hands of his father after it is erroneously revealed that he has been having an affair with his step mother Phaedra It is in Hippolytus that Euripides' world really comes to life as from the outset the audience knows that Aphrodite is causing such lust in Phaedra but Artemis Hippolytus' protector does nothing to aid him Thus the protagonists are all doomed on the whim of a goddess who is jaded simply because she isn't appreciated enoughHelen on the other hand presents a starkly different take on the Ancient World insinuating that Helen herself had nothing to do with the Trojan War and that it was simply a phantom who accompanied Paris to Troy Admittedly not his own invention Euripides nonetheless channels such energy and vigour into his interpretation of the Helen mythology as to make Helen my favourite of the plays listed here Comical and rewarding yet still tragic in force the play shows that it is uite possible for people and women at that to enjoy successful lives in the Ancient WorldAs I have said before Tragedy is far accessible than Comedy and Euripides proves that even now two and a half millennia following his death his plays are still topical informative and revolutionary; he was a feminist a sophist an idealist and when he needed to be an atheist In my humble opinion Euripides was way ahead of his time

  10. Ted Ted says:

    euripides is of course wonderful and the four plays in this volume hippolyta electra and helen are included as well are all lovely but the translation and the edition are horrid i know nothing about translating from ancient greek into english but i do know good english when i read it and there's little to be found here james morwood's prose translation is filled with tired phrasing and cliches which drag down the dynamic subject matter worse are the notes at the end of the book to which a liberal supply of in text asterisks point roughly half of morwood's notes are insulting to the reader's intelligence pointing out overarching themes explaining the meaning of common english words and interpreting the actions and thoughts of the characters this is especially annoying given that the other half of the notes which provide historical background and cultural context are useful it took me two plays to figure out which notes to check and which ones not too an effort that truly wasn't worth itreturnreturni'm going to try and find a verse translation of euripides and try again in a few years i would strongly recommend not reading this edition

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