The Wilmington Campaign: Last Departing Rays of Hope Epub

The Wilmington Campaign: Last Departing Rays of Hope Epub


  • Paperback
  • 644 pages
  • The Wilmington Campaign: Last Departing Rays of Hope
  • Chris E. Fonvielle Jr.
  • English
  • 10 June 2014
  • 9780811729918

7 thoughts on “The Wilmington Campaign: Last Departing Rays of Hope

  1. Tim Tim says:

    “And then the dead Men in all postures mangled in the head and body with brains out but with perfect features covered with sand and grimed with powder Arms legs hands faces distorted swollen all in the traverses in the trenches in green water pools in the bombproofs upon the parapet down the embankments here there everywhere Piles of dead men upon which the victorious soldiers were partaking lunch while in another place the same ghastly table was made for the convenience of the euchre players” — From a Union naval officer in “The Wilmington Campaign”Even for freuent readers of Civil War history a study of the Wilmington Campaign can provide something different Or to the point brings a little bit of everything A land campaign sea battles combined land and sea battles all taking place not in over studied Gettysburg or the sometimes overemphasized Virginia battles The Union’s late 1864early 1865 campaign to finally close up the Confederacy’s leading blockade running port in North Carolina is a fascinating tale and one not often told And it’s hard to imagine anyone doing a much better job than Chris Fonvielle Jr does hereAt the heart of the story is the fight to capture Fort Fisher a seemingly indestructible sand fort that guarded the entrance to the Cape Fear River and which still in Confederate hands allowed the South to continue its illegal as the United States saw it trade with Great Britain — those ships that could get through the Union blockade anywayIt took the Union two cracks at it to take Fort Fisher starting with a late December effort “While Union cannonballs tore into the boy soldiers near Battery Buchanan boys and girls were tearing into paper wrapped presents found underneath Christmas trees in Wilmington” in which the navy took the novel tack of trying to destroy the seaside fort by exploding a barge — laden with 430000 pounds of gunpowder — that was floated toward the fort in early morning darkness After that fascinating failure came a second attack on Fort Fisher in January 1865 a much coordinated armynavy cooperative that finally led to the taking of Fort Fisher and the eventual occupation of Wilmington upriverFonvielle is an excellent guide through this rather under the radar important campaign “The Wilmington Campaign” comes with generally excellent maps including an unusual double sided fold out map of this long narrow geographical area of contention Though there are 30 maps there are a couple of occasions in which I expected one that never appeared or one came a few pages too late Another small but nagging detail is the presence of a few too many typosFonvielle’s presentation is generally very clear as complex Civil War campaign histories go though muddiest when the Union soldiers are overrunning the fort yard by yard at last; sometimes I couldn’t tell whether Fonvielle was describing actions inside or outside Fort Fisher But in bringing us every angle the author doesn’t seem to miss a trick Starting with a vital but perhaps too long history of the area and the importance of Wilmington Fonvielle goes freuently from the sweeping to the specific including a Confederate soldier trying to keep safe during battle a five pound bucket of butter he’d just received from his girlfriend and the touching story of two North Carolina brothers on opposite sides in the fighting both stopping by to visit their mother a day apart as they marched past their old home on the road to Wilmington Most superbly Fonvielle resists the temptation to end the narrative at the occupation of Wilmington instead providing 30 plus pages of the aftermath Union occupation; starvation; a devastated city trying to survive while unable to conduct trade and with virtually nonexistent jobs and worthless or unavailable currency; inhabitants divided but mostly welcoming about their occupiers; an enormous influx of paroled or escaped Yankee prisoners; refugees including liberated slaves and disaffected whites who had attached themselves to General Sherman’s army a force whose march into North Carolina was made easier by the capture of Wilmington Fonvielle really shines here getting to the heart of what happens after an army’s basic goal is achieved but there's so much to do life to live if you've survived“The Wilmington Campaign” is fascinating stuff As mentioned that joint armynavy cooperation wasn’t often seen in the Civil War on this scale at least not on the Eastern Seaboard; neither was hand to hand fighting — of which there was a great deal as the Federals entered Fort Fisher — very freuent in the war An interesting story and well told “The Wilmington Campaign” while not absolutely great should be reuired reading for anyone wanting a deeper geographically inclusive understanding of the Civil War


  2. Steven Peterson Steven Peterson says:

    The battles for Wilmington are important given the strategic importance of the area Fort Fisher guarded the city and was a target for Union forces This book does a nice job discussing the lead up to the battles; the volume also carefully explores what happened after Union forces captured the fort Thus the battles are put into a much broader contextNote the plural here The first struggle to capture the fort was seriocomic with the attacking Union forces led by the inept General Ben Butler He had one division of the XXIV Corps and most of a second division from the XXV Corps There was also the naval force commanded by the redoubtable Admiral David Porter The end result was an embarrassing defeat from the failed effort to reduce the fort by a ship packed with explosive to the tentative amphibious landing and tepid assault on the fortHowever there was a second battle in January 1865 Union forces this time were led by General Alfred Terry and once Admiral David Porter The General and Admiral worked well together Sailors made an assault as did Army forces from a second direction While the fighting was fierce the Union forces vastly outnumbered ConfederatesFollow up battles occurred with additional fighting at Sugar Loaf Fort Anderson and Wilmington Overall command of the Confederate forces was the luckless and not very talented Braxton Bragg Suffice it to say that he was not at his best during the final stages of the campaignThis is a fine book outlining in considerable detail the campaigns for Wilmington's capture


  3. Mike Mike says:

    Great Civil War history


  4. Deborah& Deborah& says:

    The writing is well done and flows from one incident to another As I read it I imagined my ancestor's experience at Fort Fisher


  5. Derek Weese Derek Weese says:

    Wilmington north Carolina was the most important seaport in the Confederacy Blockade runners delivered needed supplies from Europe through the port facilities and despite the best efforts of the US Navy the blockade simply couldn't cut off entirely the flow of supplies into the South This combined with the Souths' own amazing efforts at wartime industrialization ensured that despite all the statistics that might indicate otherwise the Rebel armies had all the supplies they needed even if their logistics were bare bones compared to the Federals to wage war And protecting the port from the wrath of the Federal government was Fort Fisher the 'Goliath of the Confederacy' This book tells of the early 1865 combined Army Navy operation to first destroy Fort Fisher and then seize Wilmington itself in order to finally cut the Southern Confederacy off from the outside world The Battle of Fort Fisher a massive assault utilizing regular Army units the United States Colored Troops USCT and Sailors and Marines from the fleet was one of the last great bloodbaths of the war And when the Fort was secured in Federal hands despite severe losses that in killed and wounded were three times those of the Rebels the fall of Wilmington was assuredThe rest of the campaign was extremely anti climatic The Confederates unable to properly unify their command authority under one overall leader Braxton Bragg was a near absent commander commander at best the Federal forces eight times the strength of the Rebels forced them to evacuate Wilmington and retreat inland into North Carolina where they joined a gathering Rebel force under Joe Johnston who hoped to block Sherman's advancing forces before he could emerge in Lee's rear in Virginia There was sharp skirmishing however before the city fell and the USCT bore the brunt of the fighting upon the Union side showcasing their worth as soldiers and men of war The book ends with a brief account of the post war occupation even going into disturbing detail how the race relations between white and black Union soldiers began to fray following the war with several murders and reprisals taking place A sad portent for the nation at large and an issue that has never been truly solved All in all this is an excellent book about a seriously misrepresented campaign a vital one in the closing days of the War Between the States Highly recommended


  6. Chris Chris says:

    Thorough account of the Wilmington Campaign describing Confederate and Union military and political reasons for making the lower Cape Fear River the focal point of the continent in late 1864 and early 1865 Fonvielle makes a complicated subject with many moving parts easy to visualize and digest


  7. Ricky Howard Ricky Howard says:

    If you're into history this is a GREAT read This needs to be made into a movie


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The Wilmington Campaign: Last Departing Rays of Hope[Download] ➽ The Wilmington Campaign: Last Departing Rays of Hope By Chris E. Fonvielle Jr. – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Providing coverage of both battles for Fort Fisher this book includes a detailed examination of the attack and defence of Fort Anderson It also features accounts of the defence of the Sugar Loaf Line Providing coverage of both battles for Fort Fisher Campaign: Last Kindle Ð this book includes a detailed examination of the attack and defence of Fort Anderson It also features accounts of the defence of the Sugar Loaf Line and of the operations of Federal warships on the Cape Fear River.

7 thoughts on “The Wilmington Campaign: Last Departing Rays of Hope

  1. Tim Tim says:

    “And then the dead Men in all postures mangled in the head and body with brains out but with perfect features covered with sand and grimed with powder Arms legs hands faces distorted swollen all in the traverses in the trenches in green water pools in the bombproofs upon the parapet down the embankments here there everywhere Piles of dead men upon which the victorious soldiers were partaking lunch while in another place the same ghastly table was made for the convenience of the euchre players” — From a Union naval officer in “The Wilmington Campaign”Even for freuent readers of Civil War history a study of the Wilmington Campaign can provide something different Or to the point brings a little bit of everything A land campaign sea battles combined land and sea battles all taking place not in over studied Gettysburg or the sometimes overemphasized Virginia battles The Union’s late 1864early 1865 campaign to finally close up the Confederacy’s leading blockade running port in North Carolina is a fascinating tale and one not often told And it’s hard to imagine anyone doing a much better job than Chris Fonvielle Jr does hereAt the heart of the story is the fight to capture Fort Fisher a seemingly indestructible sand fort that guarded the entrance to the Cape Fear River and which still in Confederate hands allowed the South to continue its illegal as the United States saw it trade with Great Britain — those ships that could get through the Union blockade anywayIt took the Union two cracks at it to take Fort Fisher starting with a late December effort “While Union cannonballs tore into the boy soldiers near Battery Buchanan boys and girls were tearing into paper wrapped presents found underneath Christmas trees in Wilmington” in which the navy took the novel tack of trying to destroy the seaside fort by exploding a barge — laden with 430000 pounds of gunpowder — that was floated toward the fort in early morning darkness After that fascinating failure came a second attack on Fort Fisher in January 1865 a much coordinated armynavy cooperative that finally led to the taking of Fort Fisher and the eventual occupation of Wilmington upriverFonvielle is an excellent guide through this rather under the radar important campaign “The Wilmington Campaign” comes with generally excellent maps including an unusual double sided fold out map of this long narrow geographical area of contention Though there are 30 maps there are a couple of occasions in which I expected one that never appeared or one came a few pages too late Another small but nagging detail is the presence of a few too many typosFonvielle’s presentation is generally very clear as complex Civil War campaign histories go though muddiest when the Union soldiers are overrunning the fort yard by yard at last; sometimes I couldn’t tell whether Fonvielle was describing actions inside or outside Fort Fisher But in bringing us every angle the author doesn’t seem to miss a trick Starting with a vital but perhaps too long history of the area and the importance of Wilmington Fonvielle goes freuently from the sweeping to the specific including a Confederate soldier trying to keep safe during battle a five pound bucket of butter he’d just received from his girlfriend and the touching story of two North Carolina brothers on opposite sides in the fighting both stopping by to visit their mother a day apart as they marched past their old home on the road to Wilmington Most superbly Fonvielle resists the temptation to end the narrative at the occupation of Wilmington instead providing 30 plus pages of the aftermath Union occupation; starvation; a devastated city trying to survive while unable to conduct trade and with virtually nonexistent jobs and worthless or unavailable currency; inhabitants divided but mostly welcoming about their occupiers; an enormous influx of paroled or escaped Yankee prisoners; refugees including liberated slaves and disaffected whites who had attached themselves to General Sherman’s army a force whose march into North Carolina was made easier by the capture of Wilmington Fonvielle really shines here getting to the heart of what happens after an army’s basic goal is achieved but there's so much to do life to live if you've survived“The Wilmington Campaign” is fascinating stuff As mentioned that joint armynavy cooperation wasn’t often seen in the Civil War on this scale at least not on the Eastern Seaboard; neither was hand to hand fighting — of which there was a great deal as the Federals entered Fort Fisher — very freuent in the war An interesting story and well told “The Wilmington Campaign” while not absolutely great should be reuired reading for anyone wanting a deeper geographically inclusive understanding of the Civil War

  2. Steven Peterson Steven Peterson says:

    The battles for Wilmington are important given the strategic importance of the area Fort Fisher guarded the city and was a target for Union forces This book does a nice job discussing the lead up to the battles; the volume also carefully explores what happened after Union forces captured the fort Thus the battles are put into a much broader contextNote the plural here The first struggle to capture the fort was seriocomic with the attacking Union forces led by the inept General Ben Butler He had one division of the XXIV Corps and most of a second division from the XXV Corps There was also the naval force commanded by the redoubtable Admiral David Porter The end result was an embarrassing defeat from the failed effort to reduce the fort by a ship packed with explosive to the tentative amphibious landing and tepid assault on the fortHowever there was a second battle in January 1865 Union forces this time were led by General Alfred Terry and once Admiral David Porter The General and Admiral worked well together Sailors made an assault as did Army forces from a second direction While the fighting was fierce the Union forces vastly outnumbered ConfederatesFollow up battles occurred with additional fighting at Sugar Loaf Fort Anderson and Wilmington Overall command of the Confederate forces was the luckless and not very talented Braxton Bragg Suffice it to say that he was not at his best during the final stages of the campaignThis is a fine book outlining in considerable detail the campaigns for Wilmington's capture

  3. Mike Mike says:

    Great Civil War history

  4. Deborah& Deborah& says:

    The writing is well done and flows from one incident to another As I read it I imagined my ancestor's experience at Fort Fisher

  5. Derek Weese Derek Weese says:

    Wilmington north Carolina was the most important seaport in the Confederacy Blockade runners delivered needed supplies from Europe through the port facilities and despite the best efforts of the US Navy the blockade simply couldn't cut off entirely the flow of supplies into the South This combined with the Souths' own amazing efforts at wartime industrialization ensured that despite all the statistics that might indicate otherwise the Rebel armies had all the supplies they needed even if their logistics were bare bones compared to the Federals to wage war And protecting the port from the wrath of the Federal government was Fort Fisher the 'Goliath of the Confederacy' This book tells of the early 1865 combined Army Navy operation to first destroy Fort Fisher and then seize Wilmington itself in order to finally cut the Southern Confederacy off from the outside world The Battle of Fort Fisher a massive assault utilizing regular Army units the United States Colored Troops USCT and Sailors and Marines from the fleet was one of the last great bloodbaths of the war And when the Fort was secured in Federal hands despite severe losses that in killed and wounded were three times those of the Rebels the fall of Wilmington was assuredThe rest of the campaign was extremely anti climatic The Confederates unable to properly unify their command authority under one overall leader Braxton Bragg was a near absent commander commander at best the Federal forces eight times the strength of the Rebels forced them to evacuate Wilmington and retreat inland into North Carolina where they joined a gathering Rebel force under Joe Johnston who hoped to block Sherman's advancing forces before he could emerge in Lee's rear in Virginia There was sharp skirmishing however before the city fell and the USCT bore the brunt of the fighting upon the Union side showcasing their worth as soldiers and men of war The book ends with a brief account of the post war occupation even going into disturbing detail how the race relations between white and black Union soldiers began to fray following the war with several murders and reprisals taking place A sad portent for the nation at large and an issue that has never been truly solved All in all this is an excellent book about a seriously misrepresented campaign a vital one in the closing days of the War Between the States Highly recommended

  6. Chris Chris says:

    Thorough account of the Wilmington Campaign describing Confederate and Union military and political reasons for making the lower Cape Fear River the focal point of the continent in late 1864 and early 1865 Fonvielle makes a complicated subject with many moving parts easy to visualize and digest

  7. Ricky Howard Ricky Howard says:

    If you're into history this is a GREAT read This needs to be made into a movie

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