Representing Capital A Reading of Volume One eBook Ö

Representing Capital A Reading of Volume One eBook Ö



10 thoughts on “Representing Capital A Reading of Volume One

  1. Rhys Rhys says:

    This is why the Marxian analysis of globalization to which the very dynamic of Capital outlined here entitles us allows a welcome recoding of these multiple situations of misery and enforced idleness of populations helplessly in prey to the incursions of warlords and charitable agencies alike of naked life in all the metaphysical senses in which the sheer biological temporality of existences without activity and without production can be interpreted To think of all of this in terms of a kind of global unemployment rather than of this or that tragic pathos is I believe to be recommitted to the invention of a new kind of transformatory politics on a global scale p151


  2. Tom L Tom L says:

    a bit slow moving to begin with but works up to a very persuasive reading of capital that places unemployment at the centre of vol 1 lots of other jamesonian insights along the way not jameson's tightest book to date but sill packs a mean dialectical punch


  3. Augusto Delgado Augusto Delgado says:

    Hadn't I read before the whole Volume 1 of Marx's Capital perhaps this book would've become an impossibility to deal with and almost two hundreds of unintelligible pages filled with philosophical musings and esoteric references to some unknown scholars Glad that I did itThat said what Jameson provocatively states in the introduction is that Capital is not a book about politics and has nothing to do with politics instead it is a book about unemployment Which is fair enough I reckon because Marx's approach was to analyze and discover the mechanisms and dynamics of the capitalist mode of production its motion in space Throughout the seven chapters of this fine book the author gives us the effect Marx's Capital had on himJameson reading splits Capital in three sections The first one which he joyfully relates to an initial piece at the beginning of a huge musical opus such as Wagner's Rheingold comprised of the three chapters on the commodity and money Here the reader is trained in how to seek the essences behind the appearances and learns to deal with the dialectic of value use value and exchange value throughout its crystallization after labour in the money form Marx says Jameson walks us through a series of riddles where the riddle of riddles is capitalism itself and how in its radical difference from all other social formations or modes of production it can exist in the first placeThe second section almost the whole of Marx's Volume 1 runs from the second to the seventh parts of the book Here Jameson states that Marx posits a real problem and eventually solves it How can the exchange of euals or euivalents produce a profit? Or the way M changes to M' Some sort of shifting gears from dialectic to historic materialism but still retaining all the dialectical contradictions of the capitalist system its temporality and space to solve the paradox of the transformation of money into capital the working day machinery wages the production of absolute and relative surplus value how the need to produce surplus value generates unemploymentThe third section is the eight part of capital that Jameson not unjustifiably regards as a coda where the book decompresses and could be read as a distinct entity on its own right No wonder the Soviet publishers issued it as a book titled the Genesis of CapitalGreat read but one has to read the huge tome first


  4. Nathan Fisher Nathan Fisher says:

    probably 'deserves' three stars in terms of how well it stacks up against the best of marx's orthodox interpreters as well as how much of it i find in accord with my own tendency but honestly i expected this given Jameson's rep to be a lot speculative and glancing in its treatment of the text it is the former uite often but never in ways that indicate anything less than a pretty surefooted command of the material which even if it gives away some bad faith cynicism on my part left me pleasantly surprised


  5. Peter Harrison Peter Harrison says:

    As an introduction to Volume One of Marx's Capital this book does not uite meet the standard set by David Harvey's superb Companion to Marx's Capital On a purely practical level it suffers as a companion to reading the original work by not clearly referencing which sections Jameson is discussing throughout The focus is very much on the philosophical underpinning and particularly the dialectics of Marx's work and less on the purely economics This allows Jameson to bring out some interesting points such as the contradiction between use value and exchange value and it's resolution through the mediation of moneyIn some ways the most interesting point comes right at the end Despite insisting that Capital is not a political book as such an interesting judgement to say the least Jameson establishes it's tendency to unemployment as the key failure of capitalism Associating a focus on domination as a secondary and political aspect tending to anarchism Unemployment as a facet of exploitation is the key element which can form the underpinning for a renewed political project based on MarxThis book is not an introduction to Marx's economics Nor is it a replacement for the irreplaceable Companion of David Harvey As a precursor to reading Capital though it uncovers the mind set and philosophy to facilitate a critical reading


  6. Gregg Wingo Gregg Wingo says:

    Jameson has accomplished the rehabilitation of Karl Marx in our post socialist world Marx' immense contributions to the study of economics have long been overshadowed by his political writings Dr Jameson analysis of Capital Vol I focuses on Marx the scientist and reveals how a scientific reading of the work provides a clearer understanding of the second era of globalization and the Great RecessionWhile he concentrates on Marx' theme of the inherent need for unemployment in the capitalist system Jameson also highlights Marx' discussions on the importance of technological innovation and market expansionism in our economic processes Both Jameson's and Marx' critiues of the welfare state social democracy and imperialism are illuminating for students of the modern and postmodern periodsWhether you have read Capital Vol I or not this is a must read for those of us searching for our place and role in the 21st century


  7. Jessica Zu Jessica Zu says:

    Representing Capital is a smart title for its pun Marx's Capital is a representation of the capital as a system at a particular historical space time So Jameson's representation or translation or transcoding of Marx's capital is just what's needed for our particular historical space time globalization and structural unemployment Capital stands or falls a s a representation of system says Jameson And that's why it's necessary to represent Marxi's capital today 'cause as the system evolves the representation has to be updated as well


  8. Max Hodges Max Hodges says:

    a dead serious completely impenetrable unreadable book full obscure jargon and unexplained literary references an example of academia at its most loathsome and most removed from the real world


  9. Adam Adam says:

    A polysemic title if there ever was one


  10. William William says:

    Currently too esoteric for my understanding I would appreciate a direct and accessible discussion something usable by you know the working class Anyway some good commentary on here on the formative value and money I might pick this up again in the future


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Representing Capital A Reading of Volume One ❰Download❯ ➾ Representing Capital A Reading of Volume One Author Fredric Jameson – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Representing Capital Fredric Jameson's first book length engagement with Marx's magnum opus is a uniue work of scholarship that records the progression of Marx's thought as if it were a musical score A Reading Epub Ý Representing Capital Fredric Jameson's first book length engagement with Marx's magnum opus is a uniue work of scholarship that records the progression of Marx's thought as if it Representing Capital Kindle - were a musical score The textual landscape that emerges is the setting for paradoxes and contradictions that struggle toward Capital A Reading of Volume PDF/EPUB ² resolution giving rise to new antinomies and a new forward Capital A Reading eBook ¸ movement These immense segments overlap each other to combine and develop on new levels in the same way that capital itself does stumbling against obstacles that it overcomes by Capital A Reading of Volume PDF/EPUB ² progressive expansions which are inthemselves so many leaps into the unknown Marx's fundamental concepts are not presented philosophically or in social scientific terms but rather as a series of figures produced by the development of the text Jameson grasps Marx's work as a representational problem and an experiment in constructing the figure or model of the inexpressible phenomenon that is capital.

10 thoughts on “Representing Capital A Reading of Volume One

  1. Rhys Rhys says:

    This is why the Marxian analysis of globalization to which the very dynamic of Capital outlined here entitles us allows a welcome recoding of these multiple situations of misery and enforced idleness of populations helplessly in prey to the incursions of warlords and charitable agencies alike of naked life in all the metaphysical senses in which the sheer biological temporality of existences without activity and without production can be interpreted To think of all of this in terms of a kind of global unemployment rather than of this or that tragic pathos is I believe to be recommitted to the invention of a new kind of transformatory politics on a global scale p151

  2. Tom L Tom L says:

    a bit slow moving to begin with but works up to a very persuasive reading of capital that places unemployment at the centre of vol 1 lots of other jamesonian insights along the way not jameson's tightest book to date but sill packs a mean dialectical punch

  3. Augusto Delgado Augusto Delgado says:

    Hadn't I read before the whole Volume 1 of Marx's Capital perhaps this book would've become an impossibility to deal with and almost two hundreds of unintelligible pages filled with philosophical musings and esoteric references to some unknown scholars Glad that I did itThat said what Jameson provocatively states in the introduction is that Capital is not a book about politics and has nothing to do with politics instead it is a book about unemployment Which is fair enough I reckon because Marx's approach was to analyze and discover the mechanisms and dynamics of the capitalist mode of production its motion in space Throughout the seven chapters of this fine book the author gives us the effect Marx's Capital had on himJameson reading splits Capital in three sections The first one which he joyfully relates to an initial piece at the beginning of a huge musical opus such as Wagner's Rheingold comprised of the three chapters on the commodity and money Here the reader is trained in how to seek the essences behind the appearances and learns to deal with the dialectic of value use value and exchange value throughout its crystallization after labour in the money form Marx says Jameson walks us through a series of riddles where the riddle of riddles is capitalism itself and how in its radical difference from all other social formations or modes of production it can exist in the first placeThe second section almost the whole of Marx's Volume 1 runs from the second to the seventh parts of the book Here Jameson states that Marx posits a real problem and eventually solves it How can the exchange of euals or euivalents produce a profit? Or the way M changes to M' Some sort of shifting gears from dialectic to historic materialism but still retaining all the dialectical contradictions of the capitalist system its temporality and space to solve the paradox of the transformation of money into capital the working day machinery wages the production of absolute and relative surplus value how the need to produce surplus value generates unemploymentThe third section is the eight part of capital that Jameson not unjustifiably regards as a coda where the book decompresses and could be read as a distinct entity on its own right No wonder the Soviet publishers issued it as a book titled the Genesis of CapitalGreat read but one has to read the huge tome first

  4. Nathan Fisher Nathan Fisher says:

    probably 'deserves' three stars in terms of how well it stacks up against the best of marx's orthodox interpreters as well as how much of it i find in accord with my own tendency but honestly i expected this given Jameson's rep to be a lot speculative and glancing in its treatment of the text it is the former uite often but never in ways that indicate anything less than a pretty surefooted command of the material which even if it gives away some bad faith cynicism on my part left me pleasantly surprised

  5. Peter Harrison Peter Harrison says:

    As an introduction to Volume One of Marx's Capital this book does not uite meet the standard set by David Harvey's superb Companion to Marx's Capital On a purely practical level it suffers as a companion to reading the original work by not clearly referencing which sections Jameson is discussing throughout The focus is very much on the philosophical underpinning and particularly the dialectics of Marx's work and less on the purely economics This allows Jameson to bring out some interesting points such as the contradiction between use value and exchange value and it's resolution through the mediation of moneyIn some ways the most interesting point comes right at the end Despite insisting that Capital is not a political book as such an interesting judgement to say the least Jameson establishes it's tendency to unemployment as the key failure of capitalism Associating a focus on domination as a secondary and political aspect tending to anarchism Unemployment as a facet of exploitation is the key element which can form the underpinning for a renewed political project based on MarxThis book is not an introduction to Marx's economics Nor is it a replacement for the irreplaceable Companion of David Harvey As a precursor to reading Capital though it uncovers the mind set and philosophy to facilitate a critical reading

  6. Gregg Wingo Gregg Wingo says:

    Jameson has accomplished the rehabilitation of Karl Marx in our post socialist world Marx' immense contributions to the study of economics have long been overshadowed by his political writings Dr Jameson analysis of Capital Vol I focuses on Marx the scientist and reveals how a scientific reading of the work provides a clearer understanding of the second era of globalization and the Great RecessionWhile he concentrates on Marx' theme of the inherent need for unemployment in the capitalist system Jameson also highlights Marx' discussions on the importance of technological innovation and market expansionism in our economic processes Both Jameson's and Marx' critiues of the welfare state social democracy and imperialism are illuminating for students of the modern and postmodern periodsWhether you have read Capital Vol I or not this is a must read for those of us searching for our place and role in the 21st century

  7. Jessica Zu Jessica Zu says:

    Representing Capital is a smart title for its pun Marx's Capital is a representation of the capital as a system at a particular historical space time So Jameson's representation or translation or transcoding of Marx's capital is just what's needed for our particular historical space time globalization and structural unemployment Capital stands or falls a s a representation of system says Jameson And that's why it's necessary to represent Marxi's capital today 'cause as the system evolves the representation has to be updated as well

  8. Max Hodges Max Hodges says:

    a dead serious completely impenetrable unreadable book full obscure jargon and unexplained literary references an example of academia at its most loathsome and most removed from the real world

  9. Adam Adam says:

    A polysemic title if there ever was one

  10. William William says:

    Currently too esoteric for my understanding I would appreciate a direct and accessible discussion something usable by you know the working class Anyway some good commentary on here on the formative value and money I might pick this up again in the future

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *