Mastro don Gesualdo PDF/EPUB ☆ Mastro don eBook

Mastro don Gesualdo PDF/EPUB ☆ Mastro don eBook


Mastro don Gesualdo ❰EPUB❯ ✹ Mastro don Gesualdo Author Giovanni Verga – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Dopo i Malavoglia con Mastro Don Gesualdo Verga continua il suo ciclo dei Vinti In uest'opera l'autore siciliano racconta la parabola di Gesualdo Motta che da semplice muratore riesce a diventare un r Dopo i Malavoglia con Mastro Don Gesualdo Verga continua il suo ciclo dei Vinti In uest'opera l'autore siciliano racconta la parabola di Gesualdo Motta che da semplice muratore riesce a diventare un ricco borghese dedicando tutta la sua vita alla roba.

  • Paperback
  • 406 pages
  • Mastro don Gesualdo
  • Giovanni Verga
  • Italian
  • 24 June 2016
  • 9788804228936

About the Author: Giovanni Verga

Giovanni Verga was an Italian realist writer best known for his depictions of life in Sicily and especially for the short story Cavalleria Rusticana and the novel I MalavogliaThe first son of Giovanni Battista Catalano Verga and Caterina Di Mauro Verga was born into a prosperous family of Catania in Sicily Mastro don eBook ¿ He began writing in his teens producing the largely unpublished historical novel A.



10 thoughts on “Mastro don Gesualdo

  1. Anna Anna says:

    It wasn't THAT bad but probably I read it at the wrong time Plus it made me go into a reading slump I will probably continue reading the last pages another time

  2. Nick Nick says:

    Giovanni Verga did not write of heroes and main characters; he was interested in communities Mastro Don Gesualdo bursts with characters To the degree that it has a hero that role is filled by the title character a self made man in a small too tightly knit town This is not Horatio Alger country though Verga's characters are victims of fate and Don Gesualdo comes to a bad end Perhaps it is less accurate to describe Don Gesualdo as a victim of fate than of the envious community financial shenanigans and greedy relatives that surround him He is not free of unpleasant traits himself marrying off his mistress to another man when an advantageous marriage to a pregnant but poor aristocrat presents itself The real focus of the novel is the Sicilian community of this town its penurious aristocrats workers spinsters and churchmen And its subject is perhaps the endless masuerade that they present to each other trying unsuccessfully to maintain the public illusion that they are virtuous honest or richer than they actually are Verga's sharp eye for the revealing image illumines this perfectly Two old men stick their heads out of windows glancing to the right and the left looking up in the air and then withdrawing their heads like snails

  3. Giuseppe Ruotolo Giuseppe Ruotolo says:

    It has been a while since I read an Italian book in Italian and this is one of those classics that had eluded me I really enjoyed it even though the style of 19th century Italian writing was sometimes a bit of a struggle Saying that I came across many expressions long forgotten that took me back to my school days one of my favourite for crawling on all fours andava bocconi Again the writing was very tight in this version The old way of writing dialogue on the same line as description as the modern way of writing dialogue on its own on the next paragraphOn the whole very enjoyable Now I am watching the whole thing on YouTube courtesy of RAI who filmed an excellent version with Lydia Alfonsi and Enrico Maria Salerno back in 1964which I missed because I was only six

  4. Howard Howard says:

    This realist novel was written in 1888 set in developing Sicily It follows the ‘standard’ idea I’ve read in similar books of the time being the rise of ‘new money’ and the annoyancerevenge of the noble elites Gesualdo has elevated himself from a farmer to the biggest landowner Despite his charitable use of money good personality and taking Bianca as his wife in her time of ‘damaged reputation’ from an elite family just gets him nowhereThe story is very good portrayal of rural Sicily includes a cholera outbreak and a workers’ revolt I did find the rather extended families aunts barons etc rather confusing Not as passionate as Zola but a good read

  5. Anne Anne says:

    Well it was really ok but somehow I couldn't work out any connection to the protagonist and am as neutral as could be could neither fear with him nor share any other feelings not even feel in the opposite way The story itself however was really interesting

  6. Cristi Cristi says:

    i had a bad feeling about these book; didn't think i dislike it as much as malavoglia i'm starting to lose hope in the italian 19° century literature

  7. Alice Mantese Alice Mantese says:

    Haven't actually finished it I still have 1 chapter left but I got tired of it

  8. David David says:

    Once I got past the voice of the translator DH Lawrence in the first part and why I gave up on The Rainbow years ago this settles down into the set pieces of a life out of phase with the expectations of the classes around Gesualdo Motta

  9. amy amy says:

    not as good as i malavoglia

  10. Earl Adams Earl Adams says:

    This is a great novel

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

10 thoughts on “Mastro don Gesualdo

  1. Anna Anna says:

    It wasn't THAT bad but probably I read it at the wrong time Plus it made me go into a reading slump I will probably continue reading the last pages another time

  2. Nick Nick says:

    Giovanni Verga did not write of heroes and main characters; he was interested in communities Mastro Don Gesualdo bursts with characters To the degree that it has a hero that role is filled by the title character a self made man in a small too tightly knit town This is not Horatio Alger country though Verga's characters are victims of fate and Don Gesualdo comes to a bad end Perhaps it is less accurate to describe Don Gesualdo as a victim of fate than of the envious community financial shenanigans and greedy relatives that surround him He is not free of unpleasant traits himself marrying off his mistress to another man when an advantageous marriage to a pregnant but poor aristocrat presents itself The real focus of the novel is the Sicilian community of this town its penurious aristocrats workers spinsters and churchmen And its subject is perhaps the endless masuerade that they present to each other trying unsuccessfully to maintain the public illusion that they are virtuous honest or richer than they actually are Verga's sharp eye for the revealing image illumines this perfectly Two old men stick their heads out of windows glancing to the right and the left looking up in the air and then withdrawing their heads like snails

  3. Giuseppe Ruotolo Giuseppe Ruotolo says:

    It has been a while since I read an Italian book in Italian and this is one of those classics that had eluded me I really enjoyed it even though the style of 19th century Italian writing was sometimes a bit of a struggle Saying that I came across many expressions long forgotten that took me back to my school days one of my favourite for crawling on all fours andava bocconi Again the writing was very tight in this version The old way of writing dialogue on the same line as description as the modern way of writing dialogue on its own on the next paragraphOn the whole very enjoyable Now I am watching the whole thing on YouTube courtesy of RAI who filmed an excellent version with Lydia Alfonsi and Enrico Maria Salerno back in 1964which I missed because I was only six

  4. Howard Howard says:

    This realist novel was written in 1888 set in developing Sicily It follows the ‘standard’ idea I’ve read in similar books of the time being the rise of ‘new money’ and the annoyancerevenge of the noble elites Gesualdo has elevated himself from a farmer to the biggest landowner Despite his charitable use of money good personality and taking Bianca as his wife in her time of ‘damaged reputation’ from an elite family just gets him nowhereThe story is very good portrayal of rural Sicily includes a cholera outbreak and a workers’ revolt I did find the rather extended families aunts barons etc rather confusing Not as passionate as Zola but a good read

  5. Anne Anne says:

    Well it was really ok but somehow I couldn't work out any connection to the protagonist and am as neutral as could be could neither fear with him nor share any other feelings not even feel in the opposite way The story itself however was really interesting

  6. Cristi Cristi says:

    i had a bad feeling about these book; didn't think i dislike it as much as malavoglia i'm starting to lose hope in the italian 19° century literature

  7. Alice Mantese Alice Mantese says:

    Haven't actually finished it I still have 1 chapter left but I got tired of it

  8. David David says:

    Once I got past the voice of the translator DH Lawrence in the first part and why I gave up on The Rainbow years ago this settles down into the set pieces of a life out of phase with the expectations of the classes around Gesualdo Motta

  9. amy amy says:

    not as good as i malavoglia

  10. Earl Adams Earl Adams says:

    This is a great novel

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *