The Cobras Heart Epub ´ The Cobras ePUB ´

The Cobras Heart Epub ´ The Cobras ePUB ´

The Cobras Heart ❮Download❯ ➾ The Cobras Heart Author Ryszard Kapuściński – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk One of the most brilliant journalists of the postwar world Kapuscinski born 1932 spent decades criss crossing Africa witnessing the horrors of a continent ravaged by imperialism and its aftershocks Hu One of the most brilliant journalists of the postwar world Kapuscinski born spent decades criss crossing Africa witnessing the horrors of a continent ravaged by imperialism and its aftershocks Humane evocative and magical The Cobra's Heart makes the case for Kapuscinski as a great writer as well as a great journalist.


10 thoughts on “The Cobras Heart

  1. Daren Daren says:

    This book in the Penguin Great Journeys series is an excerpt or excerpts from Kapuscinski's The Shadow of the Sun It reads like a number of separate essays rather than a cohesive narrative but that is likely a result of the excerpt selectionI was impressed with the writing which I found articulate and insightful which credits the translation from Polish to English as well as the original writingCovering events in the 1950s and 60s in Ghana Tanzania Uganda and Nigeria it covers a topic in each chapter although they all revolve around the end of colonialism and independence of a sort of the various countriesSections included the independence of Ghana the districts and separations of Dar Es Salam the story of the book title involving an Egyptian cobra contracting and surviving cerebral malaria a description of being in Nigeria during the 1966 coup Idi Amin's bloody rise to power and a section of wizards both types the wizard devil or witch and the sorcererGeneral themes of 'Africanism' such as the corruption of the typical politicians and leaders run through the storiesWell recommended and I must read the full book which is sitting on the shelf waiting


  2. Chavelli Sulikowska Chavelli Sulikowska says:

    Kapuscinski was so much than an observant and intrepid international reporter he was also clearly a very talented story teller with a great capacity to translate the reality of his perceptions into sublime words on a page His account of central Africa at a time of great political upheaval and social unrest is exceptionally pertinent and moving A transfixing read It's one of the few African novels I have read that doesn't try too hard to describe the spellbinding African experience that so often seem intended to over impress the reader Rather it is a simple story told exactly as the author lived it neither embellishments nor nostalgic overtones needed Most impressive is his exceptional language in the tropics however the flora exists in a state of frenzy in an ecstasy of the most untrammelled procreation One is struck immediately by a cocky pushy abundance an endless eruption of an exuberant panting mass of vegetation all the elements of which tree bush liana vine growing pressing stimulating inciting on another have already become so interlocked knotted and clenched that only sharpened steel wielded with a horrendous amount of physical force can cut through it a passage path or tunnel This passage for me at least truly captures the strangling and eruptive bold and real experience that is Africa


  3. Shankar Shankar says:

    Everyone is aware how the African continent needs development or how underdeveloped it is Ryszard Kapuscinski's foreword in the book states how much time he has spent in Africa and continues to visit it when possible He has spent a lot of time travelling around the continent as a journalist and traveller and this book is a testimony of some of his experiencesWhat struck me the most was how well his narration threw up very sharp images of the continent An example is the the concept of time and how it is different for people in the developed world and in Africa He attempt to board a bus to travel to Kumasi and reaches on time Only to find that it is going to be delayed He asks the people around when will this depart and he is told Why ? When the bus is full? I can relate to this in India and this is similar in the smaller townsThe way it is described is very poignant Western Man is a slave to time and lives his life looking at the clock and how much time he she will spend on different things and also planning to spend time in the future as well They are aware that fighting against time is futile and they will always lose In Africa see the above example people will wait literally until Kingdom Comeand some as though time is not important In the above instance when everyone boards the bus and it is full the time has come and people come to life Energy flows through them and they are engaged in animated conversation as the bus starts to moveWhen malaria strikes the author describes a time when he is afflicted by cerebral malaria people in Africa are literally struck a very strong physical blow After the pain disappears almost after 2 weeks mind numbing pain the body is so weakthat it cannot move The author describes Africa as having a murderous climate and Africans by definition are emaciated underfed hungry and weakthis potent combination of climate with poor physical condition makes the continent really dark and a large appellation 30 million suare kilometers of vast lands in tough conditions have shaped the people They live in groups to help improve probability of survival and deal with challenges When people have accidents while driving in the Western world hey investigate vehicular failure and diagnose the remedy as increasing freuency of service station visits et al In Africa people believe this accident was not caused by vehicle failure when there are so many others plying on the road without failure why did this happen to the victim? It is because heshe was cursed by a wizard devil or wizard artist Differing levels of curses come from these people and they decide fate of communities Superstition beliefs and tradition combine with a tough climatic condition to make development in Africa a big challengeThere are many snippets of how Whites under Bismarck onwards steadily did not allow development of infrastructure in Africa only because they way wanted to exploit the riches of the land for its wealthAnd the horrific story of Idi Amin and his murderous reign until defeat against Nyerere's Tanzanian ArmyA short novel 100 pages of riveting vignettes of AfricaI loved it Highly recommended Kapuscinski writes very well indeed


  4. Dylan Dylan says:

    Made me want to have the balls to explore Africa


  5. Marian Marian says:

    The Cobra's Heart is a succinct yet expansive book about a Polish journalist's experiences and observations in 20th century Africa Just under 100 pages it's merely an excerpt of Ryszard Kapuściński's full length book The Shadow of the Sun Upon finishing it I was happy to find the full version already on my to read list added though forgotten apparently in 2013 as well as pleasantly surprised that this miniature made me want to read the full bookThough the titular chapter in which the author has a close call with a deadly cobra is interesting enough it's the historical political anecdotes that I found the most intriguing In I a White Man he talks about the feeling of apartheid in Dar es Salaam a coastal city in Tanzania which encompasses neighborhoods from the comfortable predominantly white Oyster Bay to the dry dusty African suburbs away from the water He explains how upon the eventual departure of the Europeans a new elite class emerged which continued to exploit the common people and led to events such as the 1966 military coup d'etat in Nigeria In Amin Kapuściński paints a portrait of Idi Amin the notoriously brutal dictator of Uganda in the 70sThe fishermen threw their catch onto a table and when the onlookers saw it they grew still and silent The fish was fat enormous Everyone knew that for a long time now Amin’s henchmen had been dumping the bodies of their victims in the lake and that crocodiles and meat eating fish must have been feasting on them The crowd remained uietKapuściński has a great writing style descriptive but not too wordy or overly clever Some reviewers have described his full length book as too bleak or negative I can't speak to that yet but I think these excerpts show someone with real interest in the subject and empathy with the people he is describing


  6. Yolanda Yolanda says:

    A uick read despite its dense text I basically ate this book for breakfast Kapuscinski's lush description is both an example of excellent journalism and a lesson on how prose dispenses with the need for photographs entirely Anyone keen on military history would also have found his analysis of Idi Amin's rule fascinating In his description of rule by absolute random and constant terror and the cynical employment of tribal loyalties to a dark end I see Kapuscinski's description reflecting the methods used by Saddam Hussein as recorded by Kanan Makiya The final description of what Kapuscinski tries to present as a dysfunctional culture a people he encounters shunned by other Africans who locate the dangerous and malevolent 'Other' as being among themselves should give any reader pause for thought Whether Kapuscinski was correct in how he viewed these people from outside is slightly less important for the reader than what he was alluding to He describes people who live in a constant state of suspicion of one another Is this a microcosm of the world? Could entire countries be this way for example? And would that lead to humanity's end? Heavy stuff but because Kapuscinski doesn't labour the point the book doesn't come across as nihilistic or depressing A good little read that made my mind feel expanded


  7. Faheem Hussain Faheem Hussain says:

    Reading this is like gargling honey; you want the sweetness to last so much the only feeling of terror is that the book will end Stunning


  8. Nirmal Nirmal says:

    This is the extract of the full book under Penguin's Great Journeys seriesKapuscinski has described his experiences in Africa and his experiences are authentic and his information about the place and people is very insightful something which has come by actually going in various inhospitable african terrains and facing extremely harsh conditions It covers Ghana Tanjania Nigeria Uganda It covers the events of late 50's and 60's when many african nations were getting independence from the european colonial powers It starts with Ghana's independence in 1958 and pride of the new nation and its attempts to increase educationThen he comes to Dar es Salam Author describes how Dar es salam is neatly divided into 3 sections The coastal Oyster Bay which is White ruler's area Then a middle class business district of traders of indian community and lastly the inland part for poor black populationsFrom Dar es Salam author and another person Leo drive towards Kampala Uganda There is clear road instead there is several trails forking into all directions making it impossible to find the right road On the way they are lost When they retire in an unoccupied hut author notices a semi sleep Cobra Later on it covers events of Uganda during Idi Amin's totalitarian regime and it also covers Coup in NigeriaAlong the way author comes thru several near fatal diseases and troubles including cobra Lions Crebreal Malaria etcRecommended for anyone interested in africa OR in a good travel narrative of Africa


  9. Ape Ape says:

    Bookcrossing review I really enjoyed this book so it was uite frustrating that it is so short I've added the book that these extracts are from to my wishlist to remind me to keep my eyes open for the full bookThis one is by a Polish writer and is about some of his experiences in central Africa mainly Ghana Uganda and Tanzania during the 60s This was a time when a lot of these countries were getting their independance so there's uite a bit about that Amin comes up in his own chapter kind of a character hard to miss really for this period Also stuff about life in this region people's beliefs in witches and socerors and their fear of the dark Interesting reading


  10. Nick Nick says:

    Loved this book It is a little disjointed due to the author writing for newspapers in his native Poland but is provides a fascinating insight into the culture and experiences of African Nations going through the liberating and for many ultimately failed process of freedom from the colonial yoke in the 1960's Its interesting to compare your own views and attitudes ignorant though mine are of these countries to that of the author and the time he lived in Great for those who like adventuretravel books and also political analysis of different cultures


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10 thoughts on “The Cobras Heart

  1. Daren Daren says:

    This book in the Penguin Great Journeys series is an excerpt or excerpts from Kapuscinski's The Shadow of the Sun It reads like a number of separate essays rather than a cohesive narrative but that is likely a result of the excerpt selectionI was impressed with the writing which I found articulate and insightful which credits the translation from Polish to English as well as the original writingCovering events in the 1950s and 60s in Ghana Tanzania Uganda and Nigeria it covers a topic in each chapter although they all revolve around the end of colonialism and independence of a sort of the various countriesSections included the independence of Ghana the districts and separations of Dar Es Salam the story of the book title involving an Egyptian cobra contracting and surviving cerebral malaria a description of being in Nigeria during the 1966 coup Idi Amin's bloody rise to power and a section of wizards both types the wizard devil or witch and the sorcererGeneral themes of 'Africanism' such as the corruption of the typical politicians and leaders run through the storiesWell recommended and I must read the full book which is sitting on the shelf waiting

  2. Chavelli Sulikowska Chavelli Sulikowska says:

    Kapuscinski was so much than an observant and intrepid international reporter he was also clearly a very talented story teller with a great capacity to translate the reality of his perceptions into sublime words on a page His account of central Africa at a time of great political upheaval and social unrest is exceptionally pertinent and moving A transfixing read It's one of the few African novels I have read that doesn't try too hard to describe the spellbinding African experience that so often seem intended to over impress the reader Rather it is a simple story told exactly as the author lived it neither embellishments nor nostalgic overtones needed Most impressive is his exceptional language in the tropics however the flora exists in a state of frenzy in an ecstasy of the most untrammelled procreation One is struck immediately by a cocky pushy abundance an endless eruption of an exuberant panting mass of vegetation all the elements of which tree bush liana vine growing pressing stimulating inciting on another have already become so interlocked knotted and clenched that only sharpened steel wielded with a horrendous amount of physical force can cut through it a passage path or tunnel This passage for me at least truly captures the strangling and eruptive bold and real experience that is Africa

  3. Shankar Shankar says:

    Everyone is aware how the African continent needs development or how underdeveloped it is Ryszard Kapuscinski's foreword in the book states how much time he has spent in Africa and continues to visit it when possible He has spent a lot of time travelling around the continent as a journalist and traveller and this book is a testimony of some of his experiencesWhat struck me the most was how well his narration threw up very sharp images of the continent An example is the the concept of time and how it is different for people in the developed world and in Africa He attempt to board a bus to travel to Kumasi and reaches on time Only to find that it is going to be delayed He asks the people around when will this depart and he is told Why ? When the bus is full? I can relate to this in India and this is similar in the smaller townsThe way it is described is very poignant Western Man is a slave to time and lives his life looking at the clock and how much time he she will spend on different things and also planning to spend time in the future as well They are aware that fighting against time is futile and they will always lose In Africa see the above example people will wait literally until Kingdom Comeand some as though time is not important In the above instance when everyone boards the bus and it is full the time has come and people come to life Energy flows through them and they are engaged in animated conversation as the bus starts to moveWhen malaria strikes the author describes a time when he is afflicted by cerebral malaria people in Africa are literally struck a very strong physical blow After the pain disappears almost after 2 weeks mind numbing pain the body is so weakthat it cannot move The author describes Africa as having a murderous climate and Africans by definition are emaciated underfed hungry and weakthis potent combination of climate with poor physical condition makes the continent really dark and a large appellation 30 million suare kilometers of vast lands in tough conditions have shaped the people They live in groups to help improve probability of survival and deal with challenges When people have accidents while driving in the Western world hey investigate vehicular failure and diagnose the remedy as increasing freuency of service station visits et al In Africa people believe this accident was not caused by vehicle failure when there are so many others plying on the road without failure why did this happen to the victim? It is because heshe was cursed by a wizard devil or wizard artist Differing levels of curses come from these people and they decide fate of communities Superstition beliefs and tradition combine with a tough climatic condition to make development in Africa a big challengeThere are many snippets of how Whites under Bismarck onwards steadily did not allow development of infrastructure in Africa only because they way wanted to exploit the riches of the land for its wealthAnd the horrific story of Idi Amin and his murderous reign until defeat against Nyerere's Tanzanian ArmyA short novel 100 pages of riveting vignettes of AfricaI loved it Highly recommended Kapuscinski writes very well indeed

  4. Dylan Dylan says:

    Made me want to have the balls to explore Africa

  5. Marian Marian says:

    The Cobra's Heart is a succinct yet expansive book about a Polish journalist's experiences and observations in 20th century Africa Just under 100 pages it's merely an excerpt of Ryszard Kapuściński's full length book The Shadow of the Sun Upon finishing it I was happy to find the full version already on my to read list added though forgotten apparently in 2013 as well as pleasantly surprised that this miniature made me want to read the full bookThough the titular chapter in which the author has a close call with a deadly cobra is interesting enough it's the historical political anecdotes that I found the most intriguing In I a White Man he talks about the feeling of apartheid in Dar es Salaam a coastal city in Tanzania which encompasses neighborhoods from the comfortable predominantly white Oyster Bay to the dry dusty African suburbs away from the water He explains how upon the eventual departure of the Europeans a new elite class emerged which continued to exploit the common people and led to events such as the 1966 military coup d'etat in Nigeria In Amin Kapuściński paints a portrait of Idi Amin the notoriously brutal dictator of Uganda in the 70sThe fishermen threw their catch onto a table and when the onlookers saw it they grew still and silent The fish was fat enormous Everyone knew that for a long time now Amin’s henchmen had been dumping the bodies of their victims in the lake and that crocodiles and meat eating fish must have been feasting on them The crowd remained uietKapuściński has a great writing style descriptive but not too wordy or overly clever Some reviewers have described his full length book as too bleak or negative I can't speak to that yet but I think these excerpts show someone with real interest in the subject and empathy with the people he is describing

  6. Yolanda Yolanda says:

    A uick read despite its dense text I basically ate this book for breakfast Kapuscinski's lush description is both an example of excellent journalism and a lesson on how prose dispenses with the need for photographs entirely Anyone keen on military history would also have found his analysis of Idi Amin's rule fascinating In his description of rule by absolute random and constant terror and the cynical employment of tribal loyalties to a dark end I see Kapuscinski's description reflecting the methods used by Saddam Hussein as recorded by Kanan Makiya The final description of what Kapuscinski tries to present as a dysfunctional culture a people he encounters shunned by other Africans who locate the dangerous and malevolent 'Other' as being among themselves should give any reader pause for thought Whether Kapuscinski was correct in how he viewed these people from outside is slightly less important for the reader than what he was alluding to He describes people who live in a constant state of suspicion of one another Is this a microcosm of the world? Could entire countries be this way for example? And would that lead to humanity's end? Heavy stuff but because Kapuscinski doesn't labour the point the book doesn't come across as nihilistic or depressing A good little read that made my mind feel expanded

  7. Faheem Hussain Faheem Hussain says:

    Reading this is like gargling honey; you want the sweetness to last so much the only feeling of terror is that the book will end Stunning

  8. Nirmal Nirmal says:

    This is the extract of the full book under Penguin's Great Journeys seriesKapuscinski has described his experiences in Africa and his experiences are authentic and his information about the place and people is very insightful something which has come by actually going in various inhospitable african terrains and facing extremely harsh conditions It covers Ghana Tanjania Nigeria Uganda It covers the events of late 50's and 60's when many african nations were getting independence from the european colonial powers It starts with Ghana's independence in 1958 and pride of the new nation and its attempts to increase educationThen he comes to Dar es Salam Author describes how Dar es salam is neatly divided into 3 sections The coastal Oyster Bay which is White ruler's area Then a middle class business district of traders of indian community and lastly the inland part for poor black populationsFrom Dar es Salam author and another person Leo drive towards Kampala Uganda There is clear road instead there is several trails forking into all directions making it impossible to find the right road On the way they are lost When they retire in an unoccupied hut author notices a semi sleep Cobra Later on it covers events of Uganda during Idi Amin's totalitarian regime and it also covers Coup in NigeriaAlong the way author comes thru several near fatal diseases and troubles including cobra Lions Crebreal Malaria etcRecommended for anyone interested in africa OR in a good travel narrative of Africa

  9. Ape Ape says:

    Bookcrossing review I really enjoyed this book so it was uite frustrating that it is so short I've added the book that these extracts are from to my wishlist to remind me to keep my eyes open for the full bookThis one is by a Polish writer and is about some of his experiences in central Africa mainly Ghana Uganda and Tanzania during the 60s This was a time when a lot of these countries were getting their independance so there's uite a bit about that Amin comes up in his own chapter kind of a character hard to miss really for this period Also stuff about life in this region people's beliefs in witches and socerors and their fear of the dark Interesting reading

  10. Nick Nick says:

    Loved this book It is a little disjointed due to the author writing for newspapers in his native Poland but is provides a fascinating insight into the culture and experiences of African Nations going through the liberating and for many ultimately failed process of freedom from the colonial yoke in the 1960's Its interesting to compare your own views and attitudes ignorant though mine are of these countries to that of the author and the time he lived in Great for those who like adventuretravel books and also political analysis of different cultures

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *