The Eye of Osiris ePUB ò The Eye MOBI :Þ

The Eye of Osiris ePUB ò The Eye MOBI :Þ


The Eye of Osiris [Read] ➱ The Eye of Osiris By R. Austin Freeman – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk John Bellingham is a world renowned archaeologist who goes missing mysteriously after returning from a voyage to Egypt where fabulous treasures have been uncovered Bellingham seems to have disappeared John Bellingham is a world renowned archaeologist who goes missing mysteriously after returning from a voyage to Egypt where fabulous treasures have been uncovered The Eye MOBI :Þ Bellingham seems to have disappeared leaving clues which lead all those hunting down blind alleys But when the piercing perception of the brilliant Dr Thorndyke is brought to bear on the mystery the search begins for a man tattooed with The Eye of Osiris in this strange tantalisingly enigmatic taleR Austin Freeman is the doyen of the scientific division of detective writing is best known for his character Dr John Thorndyke A close and careful investigator and the outstanding medical authority in the field of detective fiction R Austin Freeman not only tested the wits of the reader but also inspired many modern detective forensic methods Much of his long life was spent as a physician and surgeon at the Middlesex Hospital London He also held posts in West Africa and later was a medical officer at Holloway Prison The most famous of the Edwardian detective writers he rescued the detective story from thrillerdom and made it acceptable to a discerning class of reader.

  • Kindle Edition
  • The Eye of Osiris
  • R. Austin Freeman
  • English
  • 20 October 2016

About the Author: R. Austin Freeman

Richard Freeman was born in Soho London on April and was the son of Ann Maria nee Dunn and Richard Freeman a The Eye MOBI :Þ tailor He was originally named Richard and later added the Austin to his nameHe became a medical trainee at Middlesex Hospital Medical College and was accepted as a member of the Royal College of SurgeonsHe married Annie Elizabeth Edwards in and they had two sons and aft.



10 thoughts on “The Eye of Osiris

  1. Leah Leah says:

    “Horrible discovery in a watercress bed” One November day in 1902 John Bellingham disappears from the study of a friend's house where he had been waiting for his friend to return home Two years later there has still been no sign of him and his potential heirs are left in limbo unable to execute his rather strange will And then pieces of a dismembered skeleton begin to show up in odd places Meantime young Dr Paul Berkeley our narrator has fallen in love with Ruth Bellingham the missing man's niece whose father is one of the potential heirs He persuades Ruth's father Godfrey Bellingham to allow Dr John Thorndyke an expert in medical jurisprudence to look into the case It's up to Thorndyke to find a way to identify the remains and to find out what was behind Bellingham's disappearanceI've read a couple of Thorndyke short stories before but this was my first full length novel and it turned out to be not at all what I was expecting Because of the heavy emphasis on Thorndyke being a scientific investigator I thought it might be rather dry; and I knew that Freeman was famous for the “inverted” story where the reader gets to see the villain commit the crime before watching the detective solve it But this novel is laid out as a traditional mystery and is full of wit with a charming romance between Berkeley and Ruth to give it warmth I loved it Actually don't tell anyone but I fell a little in love with young Dr Berkeley myselfThe plot is complex not so much as to whodunit – the pool of potential suspects is very small – but as to how it was done and perhaps importantly why it was done in the way it was There's a lot in it about Egyptology since several of the characters are linked by their involvement in that field and a lot about methods of identifying bodies when there's not much left of them but bones The missing man's will provides another level of complexity since he specified conditions with regards to where his body should be buried – not easy to fulfil unless his corpse turns up and can be convincingly identified I believe Thorndyke's sidekick Jervis is usually the narrator of these books but although he appears in this one he only plays a small part Berkeley acts as the main sidekick and major character – as a medical doctor he's ideally placed to act as Godfrey's representative at inuests etcIn his discussion of this story in The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books Martin Edwards says that “the 'love interest' did not appeal to every reader; even Dorothy L Sayers – a fervent admirer of Freeman – deplored it” Edwards also says “the prose lacks sparkle” Oh dear It appears I have to disagree with both Sayers and Edwards – I loved the elegance of the prose which reminded me uite a lot of Conan Doyle's easy style and the wit in Berkeley's observations of the other characters made me chuckle aloud several times And I adored the romance Ruth is a lovely love interest – she's humorous and intelligent strong and self reliant She feels remarkably modern considering the book was written in 1911 and Berkeley's initial admiration is of her brain and character rather than of her looks or feminine delicacy And Berkeley's own realisation that he's falling in love is done with a lot of beautifully self deprecating wit and charm Considering Ms Sayers is responsible for one of the sappiest romances in the history of crime fiction with the adoring Lord Peter Wimsey languishing after his ladylove for several books I think she has a bit of a cheek uite frankly 😉 “'Orrible discovery at Sidcup”I turned wrathfully – for a London street boy's yell let off at point blank range is in effect like the smack of an open hand – but the inscription on the staring yellow poster that was held up for my inspection changed my anger into curiosity“Horrible discovery in a watercress bed”Now let prigs deny it if they will but there is something very attractive in a “horrible discovery” It hints at tragedy at mystery at romance It promises to bring into our grey and commonplace life that element of the dramatic which is the salt that our existence is savoured withal “In a watercress bed” too The rusticity of the background seemed to emphasise the horror of the discovery whatever it might be In among the serious characterisation and the scientific stuff there are a couple of great humorous set pieces that provide a bit of light relief such as the obstreperous jury member at the inuest or the maid servant incapable of giving a direct answer to any uestion or the various patients Berkeley sees in his professional capacity Admittedly these smack a little of the golden age snobbery that tends to mock the working classes but here it's done with so much warmth I couldn't find it in me to take offence I did guess a couple of pieces of the solution but was still in the dark as to motive and exactly how the intricate details of the plot all fitted together until Thorndyke explained all in a typical denouement scene at the end All together a very enjoyable read that has left me keen to get to know Freeman and Thorndyke betterwwwfictionfanblogwordpresscom

  2. John John says:

    I'm sure that some readers will find the mass of detail that Freeman creates around Thorndyke a bit tiresome I however really enjoy it As I have said before they are a bit formulaic but oh so clever Thorndyke's explanation at the end of this one is masterful The story was a bit slow getting going and for once I did figure out what happened from Thorndyke's clues None of this detracted from my enjoyment The Kindle dictionary is useful here as there are plenty of old words that are very rarely used today Highly recommended

  3. Mmyoung Mmyoung says:

    Sometimes one is disappointed when reading a “classic” wondering just what it was that made others rate a book so highly That has happened to this reviewer often enough to make approaching “must reads” and “classics” filled with trepidation In this case however the reasons why so many have included this book on their lists of “great mysteries” are obvious This is a delightfully written nicely placed and eminently fair example of detective fiction Freeman makes the interesting choice of having the book written from the point of view of Paul Berkeley a recently ualified doctor and former student of Thorndyke Jervis the narrator of the first two Thorndyke books has not disappeared but it is no longer through his eyes that the reader witnesses events This allows the narrator to not see all that Thorndyke does without making him irredeemably slow and unteachable Thus there are times that the reader already familiar with Thorndyke’s methods will be able to infer from things that Berkeley hears sees or read than does he Beyond here there lie spoilersIn addition to providing the reader with an excellent story of deduction and reasoning Freeman also writes one of the few believable and sympathetic love stories this reviewer has come across in the detective and mystery stories written at this time Ruth is not simply a sweet Victorian girl she has a believable personality and an interesting mind One understands exactly why Berkeley is drawn to her and one can watch the way their relationship progresses from being strangers to individuals with shared interests to becoming friends and then realizing that they have fallen love None of it is strained nor is it extraneous Berkeley is given believable motivations for his actions through the bookFreeman plays so fairly with his readers that if the reader is well versed in the detective fiction of the time they will have suspicions and inklings of understanding before at the end the truth is revealed Yet this in no way diminishes from the enjoyment of following the story and from finding out the indications and clues one missed No anvils are used nor does the author fall back on obfuscation This reader regretted the moment when the last page was turned and the story ended but then was cheered by the knowledge that there is another Thorndyke book on the “to read” shelf

  4. Nancy Oakes Nancy Oakes says:

    2nd in Freeman's Dr Thorndyke series this one's a real puzzler For those of you who enjoy the classics and I do mean classics this one is uite good and really sucks you in from the start This book has not received favorable reviews by armchair detective purists but I thought it was greatThe story starts as Dr Jervis Thorndyke's sidekick who is filling in for a vacationing physician gets word that there is a man who needs his attention A carriage is waiting to take Jervis; it is closed meaning no windows no door handles and he has to go in the dark to visit the patient the ostensible reason being that the patient does not want to see a doctor and wants to preserve his anonymity Jervis sees the man and diagnoses morphine poisoning but the man who brought Jervis there says there's no way it can be morphine poisoning and posits sleeping sickness as what's really ailing this guy Jervis does what he can then on seeing his friend Dr Thorndyke tells him about the very weird circumstances regarding his visit to the patient Another storyline surfaces a young man represented by his solicitor comes to Thorndyke with a story about his uncle's will that was changed for some reason just a few days before his death; the new will seems to be genuine but he can't understand why there would be a change Thorndyke is asked to look into the case The storylines merge and soon it becomes obvious that the two cases are related well obvious to the reader and to Thorndyke but Jervis remains ignorantI really enjoyed reading this book; Thorndyke's detection is scientifically based so he's not a detective in the flatfoot sense but it doesn't detract from the story You have to keep in mind that this was a time when detecting was a science and that a lot of the methods used in these books were just being pioneered at the time And frankly the book provided me with a few hours of entertainment and that's all I can really ask

  5. Yibbie Yibbie says:

    A wonderful mystery with just the right spookiness to hold your attention right through The suspense builds and builds right to the end and the conclusion perfect What could be better than a mystery all tied up with archaeologists?

  6. Bev Bev says:

    The Eye of Osiris 1911 by R Austin Freeman is the tantalizing tale of a missing world renowned archaeologist John Bellingham returned from a trip to Egypt only to immediately disappear from his cousin's home Or did he? When the story appears in the newspaper Dr Thorndyke the medicallegal detecting wizard points out to his medical jurisprudence students that should the uestion of proving Bellingham's death ever arise much will depend on when officials can fix the last moment he was alive From the newspaper account it would appear that Bellingham was last alive at his cousin's house But the article also mentions that a scarab which was a recognized ornament on the archeologist's watch chain had been found on the grounds belonging to the missing man's brother Godfrey IF the scarab was noticed on the watch chain by anyone at the cousin's house then there would be reason to assume that Bellingham had gone to his brother's afterwards If the absence of the scarab had been noted then it would be safe to assume that the housemaid at Mr Hurst's home the cousin was the last person to see him alive At this point it is all an intellectual puzzle to ThorndykeFast forward two years Dr Paul Berkeley one of the students in the medical jurisprudence class is filling in for an older doctor who has taken a much needed vacation He arrives at the home of Godfrey Bellingham who has moved to London for unknown reasons and circumstances bring him into Bellingham's confidence over the matter of John Bellingham's will You see Bellingham was never heard from again after he apparently walked out of his cousin's house and now Hurst and the family lawyer Mr Jellicoe want Godfrey to allow them to have him declared deceased and put the will forward for probate But the will is a legal nightmare It would seem that John Bellingham wanted his brother Godfrey to inherit but then set conditions that made it virtually impossible for him to do so which means that Hurst will inherit instead Hurst offers Godfrey a deal agree to petition for the will to be probated Hurst will inherit and will guarantee Godfrey and his daughter a stipend of 400 pounds a year And Godfrey must agree that those provisions will stand even if John or his body is found and the terms of the will allowing Godfrey to inherit can be met Godfrey steadfastly refusesBerkeley has taken a fancy to Godfrey's daughter Ruth and he convinces the Bellinghams to allow him to give Dr Thorndyke all information on the case Thorndyke is thoroughly intrigued and begins to form theories about the whereabouts of John BellinghamThen bits of a man's skeleton begin popping up in various places bits that might belong to John Bellingham But none of the bits include portions of the body that contain elements that might actually identify the bones as Bellingham's Thorndyke becomes even intrigued and sets out to prove his theory about the mystery There are several things to prove Is John Bellingham dead and if so was he murdered? If he was murdered who did it and why? And finally where is John Bellingham or his body now?This is another fine intellectual puzzle by Freeman Thorndyke is perhaps a little long winded in his scientific lectures but all is forgiven when the reader gets to enjoy the comic scenes in the coroner's inuest where it is to be decided if the bones are Bellingham and if so how he met his death and the probate court Mr Pope one of the members of the coroner's jury is priceless subjecting every witness to his stolid uestions and disbelief of anything but the most obvious of proofs He plays merry hell with Mr Jellicoe's and Mr Hurst's plan to get the bones identified as Bellingham's by raising enough doubt that the inuest is adjourned It has been a lot of fun getting reacuainted with Freeman's work this year I just recently read The Silent Witness as well My last excursion was with The Red Thumb Mark long ago and far away before I ever started writing up reviews and I had forgotten how much I enjoyed that one I'll be looking forward to reading the other Thorndyke books I have sitting on the TBR pile and I highly recommend him especially to those who enjoy the Holmes storiesFirst posted on my blog My Reader's Block Please reuest permission before reposting Thanks

  7. Dfordoom Dfordoom says:

    The Eye of Osiris published in 1911 was the second of R Austin Freeman’s many Dr Thorndyke mystery novels And a very good mystery it is tooR Austin Freeman 1862 1943 is unfortunately little know today except to devotees of vintage crime but this English writer was one of the masters of the detective story and Dr Thorndyke was his greatest creation Freeman was a ualified doctor and he made considerable and effective use of his medical knowledge in his fictionThorndyke is the scientific detective par excellence a lecturer in medical jurisprudence He is interested in facts which he organises with an almost brutal meticulousness He has little time for speculation and no time at all for leaps of intuition He is not even concerned overmuch with motives Give him the acts and he will find the one person who could have committed the crime whose guilt would be consistent with those factsThe Eye of Osiris is concerned with the mysterious disappearance of Mr John Bellingham A man of regular habits does not call at his cousin’s house find him not at home tell the maid that he will await his return and then simply vanish But that is what Mr John Bellingham appears to have doneDr Thorndyke initially has no involvement in this case He reads about it in the newspaper and notes it as being an excellent example of a point he has just been making to his students the crucial importance in such a case of establishing the last time and the last place at which the presumed victim can be said with absolute certainty to have been still alive He discusses it with his young assistant Dr Jervis and with a former student Dr Paul Berkeley who happens to be the novel’s narratorTwo years later the mystery is still involved and Dr Berkeley finds himself having a chance but momentous for all concerned encounter with the Bellingham family He is called in to treat the vanished man’s brother Godfrey Bellingham who is now living in poverty And he discovers there is much to this case that was apparent two years earlier John Bellingham made a fiendishly difficult will a will that could restore Godfrey’s fortunes or leave him condemned to perpetual penury An acrimonious legal case is now imminent Dr Berkeley also happens to fall in love with Godfrey’s daughter RuthGodfrey is a proud man unwilling to accept help that he cannot pay for but Dr Berkeley eventually persuades him that if his old mentor Dr Thorndyke were to accept the case it would not be charity since the case is so complex and so likely to produce interesting legal precedents that he would actually be doing Dr Thorndyke a favour by allowing him to become involved Which is at least partly true Thorndyke really is eager to get to grips with what should prove a most challenging caseThe challenge is firstly to establish if John Bellingham really has been murdered secondly to find out who murdered him and thirdly to find a way of fulfilling an apparently impossible clause in the willOddly enough almost everybody involved in this affair shares a passion for Egyptology a factor that will assume considerable importanceDr Thorndyke himself is by no means a colourful personage the fascination of the character lies in his methods rather than his personalityFreeman manages to combine a classic puzzle mystery novel the Thorndyke novels can in some ways be seen as launching the golden age of detective fiction with a love story His style is not flashy but nor is it dullThe great strength of the novel lies in the plotting which is ingenious enough and complicated enough to satisfy any fan of the puzzle style of mystery storyHighly recommended

  8. Katherine (Kat) Nagel Katherine (Kat) Nagel says:

    Loved it Wish I had read it when I first bought it over 30 years ago Why did I wait so long? Yes the language especially in dialogs was a bit formal and stilted to a modern ear Yes the gender attitudes were old fashioned What else would I expect in a book written in the 1911? But the storyline was interesting the author made me care about the characters and the background information on Egyptian mummies and the beginnings of the profession of forensic pathology were all fascinating It satisfied my mystery itch and I'll be looking for Freeman's other books in this series Used book stores HERE I COME

  9. Karen S Karen S says:

    London late 1890's early 1900's science murder mystery Egyptian antiuities Dr John Thorndyke no Holmesian addictions as a professor of medicine and 'pathological sleuth' What's not to like? And a little to learn about murder the problem of survivorship a bit of a love story too Well written uite good

  10. Leslie Leslie says:

    Even though I figured out the solution before the end of this 3rd book in the Thorndyke series I enjoyed seeing how Thorndyke managed to prove it to learn his reasoning I look forward to reading of this series

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10 thoughts on “The Eye of Osiris

  1. Leah Leah says:

    “Horrible discovery in a watercress bed” One November day in 1902 John Bellingham disappears from the study of a friend's house where he had been waiting for his friend to return home Two years later there has still been no sign of him and his potential heirs are left in limbo unable to execute his rather strange will And then pieces of a dismembered skeleton begin to show up in odd places Meantime young Dr Paul Berkeley our narrator has fallen in love with Ruth Bellingham the missing man's niece whose father is one of the potential heirs He persuades Ruth's father Godfrey Bellingham to allow Dr John Thorndyke an expert in medical jurisprudence to look into the case It's up to Thorndyke to find a way to identify the remains and to find out what was behind Bellingham's disappearanceI've read a couple of Thorndyke short stories before but this was my first full length novel and it turned out to be not at all what I was expecting Because of the heavy emphasis on Thorndyke being a scientific investigator I thought it might be rather dry; and I knew that Freeman was famous for the “inverted” story where the reader gets to see the villain commit the crime before watching the detective solve it But this novel is laid out as a traditional mystery and is full of wit with a charming romance between Berkeley and Ruth to give it warmth I loved it Actually don't tell anyone but I fell a little in love with young Dr Berkeley myselfThe plot is complex not so much as to whodunit – the pool of potential suspects is very small – but as to how it was done and perhaps importantly why it was done in the way it was There's a lot in it about Egyptology since several of the characters are linked by their involvement in that field and a lot about methods of identifying bodies when there's not much left of them but bones The missing man's will provides another level of complexity since he specified conditions with regards to where his body should be buried – not easy to fulfil unless his corpse turns up and can be convincingly identified I believe Thorndyke's sidekick Jervis is usually the narrator of these books but although he appears in this one he only plays a small part Berkeley acts as the main sidekick and major character – as a medical doctor he's ideally placed to act as Godfrey's representative at inuests etcIn his discussion of this story in The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books Martin Edwards says that “the 'love interest' did not appeal to every reader; even Dorothy L Sayers – a fervent admirer of Freeman – deplored it” Edwards also says “the prose lacks sparkle” Oh dear It appears I have to disagree with both Sayers and Edwards – I loved the elegance of the prose which reminded me uite a lot of Conan Doyle's easy style and the wit in Berkeley's observations of the other characters made me chuckle aloud several times And I adored the romance Ruth is a lovely love interest – she's humorous and intelligent strong and self reliant She feels remarkably modern considering the book was written in 1911 and Berkeley's initial admiration is of her brain and character rather than of her looks or feminine delicacy And Berkeley's own realisation that he's falling in love is done with a lot of beautifully self deprecating wit and charm Considering Ms Sayers is responsible for one of the sappiest romances in the history of crime fiction with the adoring Lord Peter Wimsey languishing after his ladylove for several books I think she has a bit of a cheek uite frankly 😉 “'Orrible discovery at Sidcup”I turned wrathfully – for a London street boy's yell let off at point blank range is in effect like the smack of an open hand – but the inscription on the staring yellow poster that was held up for my inspection changed my anger into curiosity“Horrible discovery in a watercress bed”Now let prigs deny it if they will but there is something very attractive in a “horrible discovery” It hints at tragedy at mystery at romance It promises to bring into our grey and commonplace life that element of the dramatic which is the salt that our existence is savoured withal “In a watercress bed” too The rusticity of the background seemed to emphasise the horror of the discovery whatever it might be In among the serious characterisation and the scientific stuff there are a couple of great humorous set pieces that provide a bit of light relief such as the obstreperous jury member at the inuest or the maid servant incapable of giving a direct answer to any uestion or the various patients Berkeley sees in his professional capacity Admittedly these smack a little of the golden age snobbery that tends to mock the working classes but here it's done with so much warmth I couldn't find it in me to take offence I did guess a couple of pieces of the solution but was still in the dark as to motive and exactly how the intricate details of the plot all fitted together until Thorndyke explained all in a typical denouement scene at the end All together a very enjoyable read that has left me keen to get to know Freeman and Thorndyke betterwwwfictionfanblogwordpresscom

  2. John John says:

    I'm sure that some readers will find the mass of detail that Freeman creates around Thorndyke a bit tiresome I however really enjoy it As I have said before they are a bit formulaic but oh so clever Thorndyke's explanation at the end of this one is masterful The story was a bit slow getting going and for once I did figure out what happened from Thorndyke's clues None of this detracted from my enjoyment The Kindle dictionary is useful here as there are plenty of old words that are very rarely used today Highly recommended

  3. Mmyoung Mmyoung says:

    Sometimes one is disappointed when reading a “classic” wondering just what it was that made others rate a book so highly That has happened to this reviewer often enough to make approaching “must reads” and “classics” filled with trepidation In this case however the reasons why so many have included this book on their lists of “great mysteries” are obvious This is a delightfully written nicely placed and eminently fair example of detective fiction Freeman makes the interesting choice of having the book written from the point of view of Paul Berkeley a recently ualified doctor and former student of Thorndyke Jervis the narrator of the first two Thorndyke books has not disappeared but it is no longer through his eyes that the reader witnesses events This allows the narrator to not see all that Thorndyke does without making him irredeemably slow and unteachable Thus there are times that the reader already familiar with Thorndyke’s methods will be able to infer from things that Berkeley hears sees or read than does he Beyond here there lie spoilersIn addition to providing the reader with an excellent story of deduction and reasoning Freeman also writes one of the few believable and sympathetic love stories this reviewer has come across in the detective and mystery stories written at this time Ruth is not simply a sweet Victorian girl she has a believable personality and an interesting mind One understands exactly why Berkeley is drawn to her and one can watch the way their relationship progresses from being strangers to individuals with shared interests to becoming friends and then realizing that they have fallen love None of it is strained nor is it extraneous Berkeley is given believable motivations for his actions through the bookFreeman plays so fairly with his readers that if the reader is well versed in the detective fiction of the time they will have suspicions and inklings of understanding before at the end the truth is revealed Yet this in no way diminishes from the enjoyment of following the story and from finding out the indications and clues one missed No anvils are used nor does the author fall back on obfuscation This reader regretted the moment when the last page was turned and the story ended but then was cheered by the knowledge that there is another Thorndyke book on the “to read” shelf

  4. Nancy Oakes Nancy Oakes says:

    2nd in Freeman's Dr Thorndyke series this one's a real puzzler For those of you who enjoy the classics and I do mean classics this one is uite good and really sucks you in from the start This book has not received favorable reviews by armchair detective purists but I thought it was greatThe story starts as Dr Jervis Thorndyke's sidekick who is filling in for a vacationing physician gets word that there is a man who needs his attention A carriage is waiting to take Jervis; it is closed meaning no windows no door handles and he has to go in the dark to visit the patient the ostensible reason being that the patient does not want to see a doctor and wants to preserve his anonymity Jervis sees the man and diagnoses morphine poisoning but the man who brought Jervis there says there's no way it can be morphine poisoning and posits sleeping sickness as what's really ailing this guy Jervis does what he can then on seeing his friend Dr Thorndyke tells him about the very weird circumstances regarding his visit to the patient Another storyline surfaces a young man represented by his solicitor comes to Thorndyke with a story about his uncle's will that was changed for some reason just a few days before his death; the new will seems to be genuine but he can't understand why there would be a change Thorndyke is asked to look into the case The storylines merge and soon it becomes obvious that the two cases are related well obvious to the reader and to Thorndyke but Jervis remains ignorantI really enjoyed reading this book; Thorndyke's detection is scientifically based so he's not a detective in the flatfoot sense but it doesn't detract from the story You have to keep in mind that this was a time when detecting was a science and that a lot of the methods used in these books were just being pioneered at the time And frankly the book provided me with a few hours of entertainment and that's all I can really ask

  5. Yibbie Yibbie says:

    A wonderful mystery with just the right spookiness to hold your attention right through The suspense builds and builds right to the end and the conclusion perfect What could be better than a mystery all tied up with archaeologists?

  6. Bev Bev says:

    The Eye of Osiris 1911 by R Austin Freeman is the tantalizing tale of a missing world renowned archaeologist John Bellingham returned from a trip to Egypt only to immediately disappear from his cousin's home Or did he? When the story appears in the newspaper Dr Thorndyke the medicallegal detecting wizard points out to his medical jurisprudence students that should the uestion of proving Bellingham's death ever arise much will depend on when officials can fix the last moment he was alive From the newspaper account it would appear that Bellingham was last alive at his cousin's house But the article also mentions that a scarab which was a recognized ornament on the archeologist's watch chain had been found on the grounds belonging to the missing man's brother Godfrey IF the scarab was noticed on the watch chain by anyone at the cousin's house then there would be reason to assume that Bellingham had gone to his brother's afterwards If the absence of the scarab had been noted then it would be safe to assume that the housemaid at Mr Hurst's home the cousin was the last person to see him alive At this point it is all an intellectual puzzle to ThorndykeFast forward two years Dr Paul Berkeley one of the students in the medical jurisprudence class is filling in for an older doctor who has taken a much needed vacation He arrives at the home of Godfrey Bellingham who has moved to London for unknown reasons and circumstances bring him into Bellingham's confidence over the matter of John Bellingham's will You see Bellingham was never heard from again after he apparently walked out of his cousin's house and now Hurst and the family lawyer Mr Jellicoe want Godfrey to allow them to have him declared deceased and put the will forward for probate But the will is a legal nightmare It would seem that John Bellingham wanted his brother Godfrey to inherit but then set conditions that made it virtually impossible for him to do so which means that Hurst will inherit instead Hurst offers Godfrey a deal agree to petition for the will to be probated Hurst will inherit and will guarantee Godfrey and his daughter a stipend of 400 pounds a year And Godfrey must agree that those provisions will stand even if John or his body is found and the terms of the will allowing Godfrey to inherit can be met Godfrey steadfastly refusesBerkeley has taken a fancy to Godfrey's daughter Ruth and he convinces the Bellinghams to allow him to give Dr Thorndyke all information on the case Thorndyke is thoroughly intrigued and begins to form theories about the whereabouts of John BellinghamThen bits of a man's skeleton begin popping up in various places bits that might belong to John Bellingham But none of the bits include portions of the body that contain elements that might actually identify the bones as Bellingham's Thorndyke becomes even intrigued and sets out to prove his theory about the mystery There are several things to prove Is John Bellingham dead and if so was he murdered? If he was murdered who did it and why? And finally where is John Bellingham or his body now?This is another fine intellectual puzzle by Freeman Thorndyke is perhaps a little long winded in his scientific lectures but all is forgiven when the reader gets to enjoy the comic scenes in the coroner's inuest where it is to be decided if the bones are Bellingham and if so how he met his death and the probate court Mr Pope one of the members of the coroner's jury is priceless subjecting every witness to his stolid uestions and disbelief of anything but the most obvious of proofs He plays merry hell with Mr Jellicoe's and Mr Hurst's plan to get the bones identified as Bellingham's by raising enough doubt that the inuest is adjourned It has been a lot of fun getting reacuainted with Freeman's work this year I just recently read The Silent Witness as well My last excursion was with The Red Thumb Mark long ago and far away before I ever started writing up reviews and I had forgotten how much I enjoyed that one I'll be looking forward to reading the other Thorndyke books I have sitting on the TBR pile and I highly recommend him especially to those who enjoy the Holmes storiesFirst posted on my blog My Reader's Block Please reuest permission before reposting Thanks

  7. Dfordoom Dfordoom says:

    The Eye of Osiris published in 1911 was the second of R Austin Freeman’s many Dr Thorndyke mystery novels And a very good mystery it is tooR Austin Freeman 1862 1943 is unfortunately little know today except to devotees of vintage crime but this English writer was one of the masters of the detective story and Dr Thorndyke was his greatest creation Freeman was a ualified doctor and he made considerable and effective use of his medical knowledge in his fictionThorndyke is the scientific detective par excellence a lecturer in medical jurisprudence He is interested in facts which he organises with an almost brutal meticulousness He has little time for speculation and no time at all for leaps of intuition He is not even concerned overmuch with motives Give him the acts and he will find the one person who could have committed the crime whose guilt would be consistent with those factsThe Eye of Osiris is concerned with the mysterious disappearance of Mr John Bellingham A man of regular habits does not call at his cousin’s house find him not at home tell the maid that he will await his return and then simply vanish But that is what Mr John Bellingham appears to have doneDr Thorndyke initially has no involvement in this case He reads about it in the newspaper and notes it as being an excellent example of a point he has just been making to his students the crucial importance in such a case of establishing the last time and the last place at which the presumed victim can be said with absolute certainty to have been still alive He discusses it with his young assistant Dr Jervis and with a former student Dr Paul Berkeley who happens to be the novel’s narratorTwo years later the mystery is still involved and Dr Berkeley finds himself having a chance but momentous for all concerned encounter with the Bellingham family He is called in to treat the vanished man’s brother Godfrey Bellingham who is now living in poverty And he discovers there is much to this case that was apparent two years earlier John Bellingham made a fiendishly difficult will a will that could restore Godfrey’s fortunes or leave him condemned to perpetual penury An acrimonious legal case is now imminent Dr Berkeley also happens to fall in love with Godfrey’s daughter RuthGodfrey is a proud man unwilling to accept help that he cannot pay for but Dr Berkeley eventually persuades him that if his old mentor Dr Thorndyke were to accept the case it would not be charity since the case is so complex and so likely to produce interesting legal precedents that he would actually be doing Dr Thorndyke a favour by allowing him to become involved Which is at least partly true Thorndyke really is eager to get to grips with what should prove a most challenging caseThe challenge is firstly to establish if John Bellingham really has been murdered secondly to find out who murdered him and thirdly to find a way of fulfilling an apparently impossible clause in the willOddly enough almost everybody involved in this affair shares a passion for Egyptology a factor that will assume considerable importanceDr Thorndyke himself is by no means a colourful personage the fascination of the character lies in his methods rather than his personalityFreeman manages to combine a classic puzzle mystery novel the Thorndyke novels can in some ways be seen as launching the golden age of detective fiction with a love story His style is not flashy but nor is it dullThe great strength of the novel lies in the plotting which is ingenious enough and complicated enough to satisfy any fan of the puzzle style of mystery storyHighly recommended

  8. Katherine (Kat) Nagel Katherine (Kat) Nagel says:

    Loved it Wish I had read it when I first bought it over 30 years ago Why did I wait so long? Yes the language especially in dialogs was a bit formal and stilted to a modern ear Yes the gender attitudes were old fashioned What else would I expect in a book written in the 1911? But the storyline was interesting the author made me care about the characters and the background information on Egyptian mummies and the beginnings of the profession of forensic pathology were all fascinating It satisfied my mystery itch and I'll be looking for Freeman's other books in this series Used book stores HERE I COME

  9. Karen S Karen S says:

    London late 1890's early 1900's science murder mystery Egyptian antiuities Dr John Thorndyke no Holmesian addictions as a professor of medicine and 'pathological sleuth' What's not to like? And a little to learn about murder the problem of survivorship a bit of a love story too Well written uite good

  10. Leslie Leslie says:

    Even though I figured out the solution before the end of this 3rd book in the Thorndyke series I enjoyed seeing how Thorndyke managed to prove it to learn his reasoning I look forward to reading of this series

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