Learning to Read in the Late Ottoman Empire and the Early

Learning to Read in the Late Ottoman Empire and the Early



1 thoughts on “Learning to Read in the Late Ottoman Empire and the Early Turkish Republic

  1. K K says:

    The level of anticipation I felt to read this book was kind of ridiculous I can imagine other educators feeling the same The challenge of changing from one alphabet to another and going from approximately 10% literacy in the Ottoman Empire to higher levels of literacy in the Republic is just incredible interesting historyThe author wants the reader to understand that reading promotion and reform began before the Republic and that this growth was a continuum and not entirely the accomplishment of 'just' Republican times despite what Republic boosterism would have you believeThings that fascinated me that helped me understand why Turkey has of an oral tradition than a written tradition religious instructors used reading to remind them of text and what they already knew rather than to learn new content the Ottoman alphabet for the Turkish language was based on Arabic How confusing Arabic and Persian words existed in Ottoman Turkish as well Turkish students first learned to read the Koran which is in a language other than their native tongue the purpose of reading was different It was for saving the soul not improving the mind children begin learning to read on an auspicious appointed day a lovely idea printing came to the Ottoman Empire 250 years after the rest of EuropeThis book paired with Geoffrey Lewis' The Turkish Language Reform A Catastrophic Success will probably sate my curiosity about how alphabet reform and educational traditions changed Hats off to the Turkish generation who undertook alphabet and governance changes at the exact same time Wow What a lot to live through


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Learning to Read in the Late Ottoman Empire and the Early Turkish Republic [Ebook] ➤ Learning to Read in the Late Ottoman Empire and the Early Turkish Republic By Benjamin C. Fortna – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk This book provides an exploration of the ways in which children learned and were taught to read against the background of the transition from Ottoman Empire to Turkish Republic This study gives us a f This Read in the Late Kindle - book provides an exploration of the ways Read in Kindle Ó in which children learned and were taught to read against the background of the transition from Learning to MOBI :Þ Ottoman Empire to Turkish Republic This study gives us a fresh perspective on the transition from empire to republic by showing us the ways that to read in PDF ☆ reading was central to the construction of modernity.

1 thoughts on “Learning to Read in the Late Ottoman Empire and the Early Turkish Republic

  1. K K says:

    The level of anticipation I felt to read this book was kind of ridiculous I can imagine other educators feeling the same The challenge of changing from one alphabet to another and going from approximately 10% literacy in the Ottoman Empire to higher levels of literacy in the Republic is just incredible interesting historyThe author wants the reader to understand that reading promotion and reform began before the Republic and that this growth was a continuum and not entirely the accomplishment of 'just' Republican times despite what Republic boosterism would have you believeThings that fascinated me that helped me understand why Turkey has of an oral tradition than a written tradition religious instructors used reading to remind them of text and what they already knew rather than to learn new content the Ottoman alphabet for the Turkish language was based on Arabic How confusing Arabic and Persian words existed in Ottoman Turkish as well Turkish students first learned to read the Koran which is in a language other than their native tongue the purpose of reading was different It was for saving the soul not improving the mind children begin learning to read on an auspicious appointed day a lovely idea printing came to the Ottoman Empire 250 years after the rest of EuropeThis book paired with Geoffrey Lewis' The Turkish Language Reform A Catastrophic Success will probably sate my curiosity about how alphabet reform and educational traditions changed Hats off to the Turkish generation who undertook alphabet and governance changes at the exact same time Wow What a lot to live through

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