Alphabetical Order PDF Þ Paperback

Alphabetical Order PDF Þ Paperback


6 thoughts on “Alphabetical Order

  1. Stuart Aken Stuart Aken says:

    Plays are of course intended to be seen experienced rather than read However as a writer who has had a radio play broadcast by the redoubtable BBC I have an interest in play scripts and enjoy reading them as wellMichael Frayn has a reputation as a playwright who understands comedy And Alphabetical Order is a great example of his strength in creating humour The stage setting remains unchanged throughout the 2 acts except for some 'tidying' essential to the story So the whole action takes place within the library of a local newspaper and involves the librarians and some of the reporting and editorial staff Having worked on a local paper as a photographer I have some empathy with the characters portrayed and some understanding of their peculiar pressures and priorities The characters are well drawn using the playwright's only real tool; that of dialogue It's possible to picture them on the stage from the script because they are so well described by their chosen words and what they have to say or what is said about them by other characters; the essence of a stage playThe action is minimal as is the plot but the play covers a great deal of ground in terms of character building and relationship development There are plenty of jokes and many occasions given to laughter both with and at the characters But there is pathos too The aura of gentle decay and the overriding sense of futility combine with the overall frivolity of the dialogue which hides those secrets that lurk beneath the surface of the spoken text So there are some surprises but the drama plays out or less as expected The denouement is slightly surprising in the way it happens but the reader realises that the outcome was in fact inevitable given the natures of the characters and their employment Typical of the very English setting and characterisation there is a lot beneath the surface unstated but alluded to making the play a multi layered experienceI enjoyed this and recommend it to those who enjoy their drama in thoughtful but gentle comedy form


  2. Nick Jones Nick Jones says:

    An early Michael Frayn comedy It feels a bit like a sitcom It has its situation – the library of a newspaper which might in itself be uaintly amusing for younger readers – and a series of characters who have fairly fixed personalities and constantly react to each other in much the same way But that’s a bit unfair There is a development between the two acts so the situation changes maybe it is like two seasons of a sitcom And to be fair it’s much better than most sitcoms Maybe I am being unfair but I can’t really think of anything else to say about it The big development is that one of the characters brings order and efficiency to the chaos of the library but it doesn’t bring happiness It’s uite amusing but slightly forgettable Which is why I can think of anything to write I can’t remember much about it


  3. Alaina Sloo Alaina Sloo says:

    After reading and loving Frayn’s Noises Off I thought I’d try a few of his plays This one had the same type of rapid fire dialogue but the farce didn’t work uite as well for me in print I think this might be one of those works you have to see performed to appreciate well


  4. Moushumi Ghosh Moushumi Ghosh says:

    Read this play after being simply blown away by the brilliant Noises Off an interpretation of Atul Kumar's What fun that was While reading Alphabetical Order I realised that I was seeing a master develop his craft It's a good play but not a genius one Definitely only for fans of Michael Frayn or fans of theatre in general


  5. Robert Robert says:

    Read with Portland Playreaders


  6. Jeff Jeff says:

    A clever play probably better on its feet


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Alphabetical Order ➶ Alphabetical Order Free ➬ Author Michael Frayn – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Alphabetical Order takes place in the library office of a provincial newspaper a scene of permanent and utter confusion The cluttered chaos of the room is matched by the life of its manager Lucy and h Alphabetical Order takes place in the library office of a provincial newspaper a scene of permanent and utter confusion The cluttered chaos of the room is matched by the life of its manager Lucy and her associates It is a scene of warmth and easy if somewhat juvenile and irresponsible light heartedness until Leslie a new young assistant with a passion for organization enters In a short time she has transformed both the lives of its inhabitants and visitors into something orderly neat arid and colorless An announcement that the paper is to close leads in Leslie's absence to a revitalizing and glorious orgy of destruction and return to chaos women men.

  • Paperback
  • Alphabetical Order
  • Michael Frayn
  • English
  • 25 October 2016
  • 9780573016004

About the Author: Michael Frayn

Michael Frayn is an English playwright and novelist He is best known as the author of the farce Noises Off and the dramas Copenhagen and Democracy His novels such as Towards the End of the Morning Headlong and Spies have also been critical and commercial successes making him one of the handful of writers in the English language to succeed in both drama and prose fiction His works often rais.


6 thoughts on “Alphabetical Order

  1. Stuart Aken Stuart Aken says:

    Plays are of course intended to be seen experienced rather than read However as a writer who has had a radio play broadcast by the redoubtable BBC I have an interest in play scripts and enjoy reading them as wellMichael Frayn has a reputation as a playwright who understands comedy And Alphabetical Order is a great example of his strength in creating humour The stage setting remains unchanged throughout the 2 acts except for some 'tidying' essential to the story So the whole action takes place within the library of a local newspaper and involves the librarians and some of the reporting and editorial staff Having worked on a local paper as a photographer I have some empathy with the characters portrayed and some understanding of their peculiar pressures and priorities The characters are well drawn using the playwright's only real tool; that of dialogue It's possible to picture them on the stage from the script because they are so well described by their chosen words and what they have to say or what is said about them by other characters; the essence of a stage playThe action is minimal as is the plot but the play covers a great deal of ground in terms of character building and relationship development There are plenty of jokes and many occasions given to laughter both with and at the characters But there is pathos too The aura of gentle decay and the overriding sense of futility combine with the overall frivolity of the dialogue which hides those secrets that lurk beneath the surface of the spoken text So there are some surprises but the drama plays out or less as expected The denouement is slightly surprising in the way it happens but the reader realises that the outcome was in fact inevitable given the natures of the characters and their employment Typical of the very English setting and characterisation there is a lot beneath the surface unstated but alluded to making the play a multi layered experienceI enjoyed this and recommend it to those who enjoy their drama in thoughtful but gentle comedy form

  2. Nick Jones Nick Jones says:

    An early Michael Frayn comedy It feels a bit like a sitcom It has its situation – the library of a newspaper which might in itself be uaintly amusing for younger readers – and a series of characters who have fairly fixed personalities and constantly react to each other in much the same way But that’s a bit unfair There is a development between the two acts so the situation changes maybe it is like two seasons of a sitcom And to be fair it’s much better than most sitcoms Maybe I am being unfair but I can’t really think of anything else to say about it The big development is that one of the characters brings order and efficiency to the chaos of the library but it doesn’t bring happiness It’s uite amusing but slightly forgettable Which is why I can think of anything to write I can’t remember much about it

  3. Alaina Sloo Alaina Sloo says:

    After reading and loving Frayn’s Noises Off I thought I’d try a few of his plays This one had the same type of rapid fire dialogue but the farce didn’t work uite as well for me in print I think this might be one of those works you have to see performed to appreciate well

  4. Moushumi Ghosh Moushumi Ghosh says:

    Read this play after being simply blown away by the brilliant Noises Off an interpretation of Atul Kumar's What fun that was While reading Alphabetical Order I realised that I was seeing a master develop his craft It's a good play but not a genius one Definitely only for fans of Michael Frayn or fans of theatre in general

  5. Robert Robert says:

    Read with Portland Playreaders

  6. Jeff Jeff says:

    A clever play probably better on its feet

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *