Paperback ï Clouds PDF Þ

Paperback ï Clouds PDF Þ


Clouds ❴Read❵ ➪ Clouds Author Michael Frayn – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Owen Shorter professional journalist and Mara Hill well known lady novelist discover at the beginning of the play that they have been sent to Cuba to write for rival color supplements We follow their Owen Shorter professional journalist and Mara Hill well known lady novelist discover at the beginning of the play that they have been sent to Cuba to write for rival color supplements We follow their progress together with Ed an author from Illinois and their guide Angel on their fact finding mission as they do the obligatory rounds of official visits to sugar cane processing plants new towns and other industrial show pieces women men.


3 thoughts on “Clouds

  1. Nick Jones Nick Jones says:

    I’ve recently been reading early Michael Frayn plays and not really enjoying them If they were novels I would have given up long ago but a play only takes a couple of hours or so to read – so I carry on reading Michael Frayn because there are a lot in the town library Clouds feels like a sitcom Not formally I think it is to do with Owen the journalist writing a story on Cuba He is cynical and negative putting down his inexperienced fellow journalist Mara who is on the same mission for a rival newspaper; Owen reminds me of the privileged graduates returning to their Oxford college for a reunion in Frayn’s previous play Donkey’s Years At first the play seems as though it is going to satirise the smugness of the character but after a while you realise that Owen is getting the best lines he is one of those loveably grumpy characters that inhabit sitcoms This impression was furthered when I noticed that Nigel Hawthorne played the character during the play’s first run Hawthorne is most famous to the British public for his role in the BBC sitcom Yes Minister The most notable characteristic of sitcom characters is that they never develop – if they did the basic situation that is necessary for the comedy would be destroyed And Owen like the privileged bunch in Donkey’s Years doesn’t develop Things happen there is a narrative – it turns out that all of Owen’s animosity towards Mara is romantic desire but the play can’t become a romcom because Owen is married Maybe Clouds becomes wistful and sad But I don’t really know what it is doing and that might be because I am missing the obvious and I don’t know what the Owen Mara relationship has to do with the Cuba that they are visiting and the satire around official journalistic visits Maybe in a good production there are amusing lines but it all seems a little inconseuential


  2. Stuart Aken Stuart Aken says:

    First performed at the Hampstead Theatre London in August 1976 this two act play is another of Frayn’s comedies However I’m at a loss to know for certain what it’s really aboutSet in Cuba though the stage is a blank arena with stepped surfaces chairs and a back projection screen to receive the images of the sky that give the play its name the action revolves around a trio of writers who are there to report on the state of the island a short time after Castro’s takeover As a teenager during the time of the Cuba Crisis when we held our collective breath as Kruschev and Kennedy postured over the issue of nuclear missiles sited on the island Cuba holds a resonance unlikely to echo through the blood of the modern readerThere’s a love story in here though it may be that simple lust is the driver in spite of the protestations of the protagonists There are cultural misunderstandings cynicism on an epic scale subtle and not so subtle political asides and of course humour The go getting American the lady novelist and the reporter from the UK are stereotypical yet manage to convey some individuality The tired diplomat cum guide cum minder is just that but hovers between his sense of duty and the lust he develops for the lady novelist The driver is a rogue philanderer and wide boy with an obvious eye for the ladies and the only male in the cast who appears immune to the charms of the novelistSo an interesting cast with an intriguing span of relationships We follow them on their odd tour of the island a typical itinerary for a communist regime ensuring these foreigners see all the technical and commercial developments but are excluded from intercourse with the actual people wherever possible There is the standard misunderstanding deliberate or otherwise between the eventual would be lovers There is the expected friction between the American and British writers There is the unconscious condescension shown by the writers for their guardian and driver But in the hands of this master the sometimes spare dialogue is made to say so much than the mere wordsI imagine the sparse setting would enhance the dialogue which is what the play is all about removing visual distractions so that all attention is given to the characters as they set about their tasks of misinformation professional and personal rivalry seduction and petty jealousy The text made me laugh where I was expected to find humour It made me react emotionally to the various scenes of conflict co operation misunderstanding and attempted sexual conuest But I was left with an ending that seemed unfinished and flat I didn’t expect an explosion merely something that wound up at least something of the action that had preceded it rather than the rather vague conclusion that the experience had changed nothingWould I go to see the play performed? I wouldn’t ueue but if it were easy to attend I think I’d give it a try Make of that what you will


  3. Bettie Bettie says:

    Bettie's Books


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

3 thoughts on “Clouds

  1. Nick Jones Nick Jones says:

    I’ve recently been reading early Michael Frayn plays and not really enjoying them If they were novels I would have given up long ago but a play only takes a couple of hours or so to read – so I carry on reading Michael Frayn because there are a lot in the town library Clouds feels like a sitcom Not formally I think it is to do with Owen the journalist writing a story on Cuba He is cynical and negative putting down his inexperienced fellow journalist Mara who is on the same mission for a rival newspaper; Owen reminds me of the privileged graduates returning to their Oxford college for a reunion in Frayn’s previous play Donkey’s Years At first the play seems as though it is going to satirise the smugness of the character but after a while you realise that Owen is getting the best lines he is one of those loveably grumpy characters that inhabit sitcoms This impression was furthered when I noticed that Nigel Hawthorne played the character during the play’s first run Hawthorne is most famous to the British public for his role in the BBC sitcom Yes Minister The most notable characteristic of sitcom characters is that they never develop – if they did the basic situation that is necessary for the comedy would be destroyed And Owen like the privileged bunch in Donkey’s Years doesn’t develop Things happen there is a narrative – it turns out that all of Owen’s animosity towards Mara is romantic desire but the play can’t become a romcom because Owen is married Maybe Clouds becomes wistful and sad But I don’t really know what it is doing and that might be because I am missing the obvious and I don’t know what the Owen Mara relationship has to do with the Cuba that they are visiting and the satire around official journalistic visits Maybe in a good production there are amusing lines but it all seems a little inconseuential

  2. Stuart Aken Stuart Aken says:

    First performed at the Hampstead Theatre London in August 1976 this two act play is another of Frayn’s comedies However I’m at a loss to know for certain what it’s really aboutSet in Cuba though the stage is a blank arena with stepped surfaces chairs and a back projection screen to receive the images of the sky that give the play its name the action revolves around a trio of writers who are there to report on the state of the island a short time after Castro’s takeover As a teenager during the time of the Cuba Crisis when we held our collective breath as Kruschev and Kennedy postured over the issue of nuclear missiles sited on the island Cuba holds a resonance unlikely to echo through the blood of the modern readerThere’s a love story in here though it may be that simple lust is the driver in spite of the protestations of the protagonists There are cultural misunderstandings cynicism on an epic scale subtle and not so subtle political asides and of course humour The go getting American the lady novelist and the reporter from the UK are stereotypical yet manage to convey some individuality The tired diplomat cum guide cum minder is just that but hovers between his sense of duty and the lust he develops for the lady novelist The driver is a rogue philanderer and wide boy with an obvious eye for the ladies and the only male in the cast who appears immune to the charms of the novelistSo an interesting cast with an intriguing span of relationships We follow them on their odd tour of the island a typical itinerary for a communist regime ensuring these foreigners see all the technical and commercial developments but are excluded from intercourse with the actual people wherever possible There is the standard misunderstanding deliberate or otherwise between the eventual would be lovers There is the expected friction between the American and British writers There is the unconscious condescension shown by the writers for their guardian and driver But in the hands of this master the sometimes spare dialogue is made to say so much than the mere wordsI imagine the sparse setting would enhance the dialogue which is what the play is all about removing visual distractions so that all attention is given to the characters as they set about their tasks of misinformation professional and personal rivalry seduction and petty jealousy The text made me laugh where I was expected to find humour It made me react emotionally to the various scenes of conflict co operation misunderstanding and attempted sexual conuest But I was left with an ending that seemed unfinished and flat I didn’t expect an explosion merely something that wound up at least something of the action that had preceded it rather than the rather vague conclusion that the experience had changed nothingWould I go to see the play performed? I wouldn’t ueue but if it were easy to attend I think I’d give it a try Make of that what you will

  3. Bettie Bettie says:

    Bettie's Books

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *