Paperback è Donkey's Years Kindle Þ

Paperback è Donkey's Years Kindle Þ


Donkey's Years [PDF / Epub] ✑ Donkey's Years ☄ Michael Frayn – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Twenty years after graduation six former students return to their college for a reunion dinner in this late 1970s riotous farce which takes on the ridiculousness of English propriety Seeing the reunio Twenty years after graduation six former students return to their college for a reunion dinner in this late s riotous farce which takes on the ridiculousness of English propriety Seeing the reunion as a chance to escape the tedium of family and working life the group seizes the opportunity for drunken buffoonery and to reminisce about – and relive – their jaunty college days in stuffy middle class white male Oxbridge college In classic bedroom farce form the group gets locked into the college overnight with the much desired head master's wife and a cabinet minister They and their high profile guests are flung into one embarrassing situation after another as they chase in and out of multiple bedroom doors some in their underwear with misunderstandings and mistaken identities all the staples of classic farce Frayn's extraordinary repartee raises the genre to new heights of wit and subtly as the group comedically ponders their varying degrees of success and the role of predestination and free will in their life choices.

  • Paperback
  • 112 pages
  • Donkey's Years
  • Michael Frayn
  • English
  • 02 October 2016
  • 9780413776228

About the Author: Michael Frayn

Michael Frayn is an English playwright and novelist He is best known as the author of the farce Noises Off and the dramas Copenhagen and Democracy His novels such as Towards the End of the Morning Headlong and Spies have also been critical and commercial successes making him one of the handful of writers in the English language to succeed in both drama and prose fiction His works often rais.



5 thoughts on “Donkey's Years

  1. David David says:

    Read sometime in the 80s after seeing Noises Off for the first time

  2. Nick Jones Nick Jones says:

    A twenty year reunion at an Oxbridge college We are introduced to five characters all as we should expect generally successful in their post University careers A junior minister in the government an assistant chief surgeon a notable civil servant an author specializing in writing ghost autobiographies a vicar They greet each other with stock phrases about how they haven’t changed a bit the repetitions makes it sound like Pinter translated into English – and then they try and relive the high jinks of their student years And there is another who never had a room in college and feels he missed out on student life and now wants to compensate And there is the research fellow and college lecturer who is younger than the guests but feels responsible for the outcomes of the high jinks And there is Lady Driver wife of the college Master who is away and comes to visit an old loveralthough as it turns out he has not attended the reunion Donkey’s Years is a farce so once events are set in motion they gain a comic life of their own But farce tends to work better on the stage than on the page There is a scene for instance where Lady Driver is hiding behind a door in someone’s rooms I won’t try to explain why every time someone closes the door there is a comic suspense as we wait for someone to turn their head and see herbut then the door will be opened and she will be hidden againand repeat – in a good production I can imagine this could be an amusing maybe a hilarious situation but in the text it is just a series of stage directions And finally not much happens The characters leave the play much as they went in ie smug and superior The exception is the misfit who didn’t live in the college and now wants the chance he gets punished for his presumptionor maybe for being dullor maybe for not being smug and superior Even if Donkey’s Years is much funnier in a production I’m still not sure that I like it

  3. Alaina Sloo Alaina Sloo says:

    Fun farce

  4. Stuart Aken Stuart Aken says:

    First produced at London’s Globe Theatre in July 1976 coincidentally the year in which my novel Breaking Faith is set and a year of drought and heat wave in UK this three act play is another demonstration of Frayn’s very British humourAlthough described simply as a play in three acts this is much like a farce in the true British dare I say English? tradition If not actually a farce it could be taken as a parody of the style It has all the ingredients sexual misunderstandings English sexual reserve hypocrisy disguised as custom bedrooms and of course the loss of clothes for the female and trousers for the male I imagine the reader would have to become watcher in order to determine whether this is truly farce or the parody I suspectIt is of course full of humour poking fun at the stuffed shirts of academia politicians and the servile subclass of those who serve such pretentions There is much repetition which on the page can be a little wearying but on stage would work a treat given good actors The action is confined to a single location for each of the three acts and this serves to emphasise the claustrophobic and sheltered nature of the attitudes encapsulated by the cast These are people who have no understanding of what most of us would call the ‘real world’ Privileged spoilt and elevated beyond their natural abilities they posture and pose their way through life completely unaware of the priorities faced by ordinary people outside their favoured circleThe thread of lust disguised as admiration until alcohol allows for honesty permeates the play The single female representative is the focus of all male attention apart of course from that of the gay vicar another stock character of English farce There is little concern for the damage done to either lives or property by their barbs and actions The level of achievement for most of the protagonists is well above their natural abilities and is an effective way of pointing out how birth and class can elevate beyond desert So a social statement but one so well submerged in humour that it may be missed by the less attentive And the humour is brilliant It had me laughing out loud and freuently much to the distress of a fellow worker who shared the small room that serves as a temporary sanctuary from the busy and noisy office in which I perform my day job The jokes come thick and fast many derived from simple misunderstandings made clear to the audience but hidden from the characters I thoroughly enjoyed this play and would definitely attend a theatre for a performance

  5. Melody Melody says:

    I feel like I need to see this one

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5 thoughts on “Donkey's Years

  1. David David says:

    Read sometime in the 80s after seeing Noises Off for the first time

  2. Nick Jones Nick Jones says:

    A twenty year reunion at an Oxbridge college We are introduced to five characters all as we should expect generally successful in their post University careers A junior minister in the government an assistant chief surgeon a notable civil servant an author specializing in writing ghost autobiographies a vicar They greet each other with stock phrases about how they haven’t changed a bit the repetitions makes it sound like Pinter translated into English – and then they try and relive the high jinks of their student years And there is another who never had a room in college and feels he missed out on student life and now wants to compensate And there is the research fellow and college lecturer who is younger than the guests but feels responsible for the outcomes of the high jinks And there is Lady Driver wife of the college Master who is away and comes to visit an old loveralthough as it turns out he has not attended the reunion Donkey’s Years is a farce so once events are set in motion they gain a comic life of their own But farce tends to work better on the stage than on the page There is a scene for instance where Lady Driver is hiding behind a door in someone’s rooms I won’t try to explain why every time someone closes the door there is a comic suspense as we wait for someone to turn their head and see herbut then the door will be opened and she will be hidden againand repeat – in a good production I can imagine this could be an amusing maybe a hilarious situation but in the text it is just a series of stage directions And finally not much happens The characters leave the play much as they went in ie smug and superior The exception is the misfit who didn’t live in the college and now wants the chance he gets punished for his presumptionor maybe for being dullor maybe for not being smug and superior Even if Donkey’s Years is much funnier in a production I’m still not sure that I like it

  3. Alaina Sloo Alaina Sloo says:

    Fun farce

  4. Stuart Aken Stuart Aken says:

    First produced at London’s Globe Theatre in July 1976 coincidentally the year in which my novel Breaking Faith is set and a year of drought and heat wave in UK this three act play is another demonstration of Frayn’s very British humourAlthough described simply as a play in three acts this is much like a farce in the true British dare I say English? tradition If not actually a farce it could be taken as a parody of the style It has all the ingredients sexual misunderstandings English sexual reserve hypocrisy disguised as custom bedrooms and of course the loss of clothes for the female and trousers for the male I imagine the reader would have to become watcher in order to determine whether this is truly farce or the parody I suspectIt is of course full of humour poking fun at the stuffed shirts of academia politicians and the servile subclass of those who serve such pretentions There is much repetition which on the page can be a little wearying but on stage would work a treat given good actors The action is confined to a single location for each of the three acts and this serves to emphasise the claustrophobic and sheltered nature of the attitudes encapsulated by the cast These are people who have no understanding of what most of us would call the ‘real world’ Privileged spoilt and elevated beyond their natural abilities they posture and pose their way through life completely unaware of the priorities faced by ordinary people outside their favoured circleThe thread of lust disguised as admiration until alcohol allows for honesty permeates the play The single female representative is the focus of all male attention apart of course from that of the gay vicar another stock character of English farce There is little concern for the damage done to either lives or property by their barbs and actions The level of achievement for most of the protagonists is well above their natural abilities and is an effective way of pointing out how birth and class can elevate beyond desert So a social statement but one so well submerged in humour that it may be missed by the less attentive And the humour is brilliant It had me laughing out loud and freuently much to the distress of a fellow worker who shared the small room that serves as a temporary sanctuary from the busy and noisy office in which I perform my day job The jokes come thick and fast many derived from simple misunderstandings made clear to the audience but hidden from the characters I thoroughly enjoyed this play and would definitely attend a theatre for a performance

  5. Melody Melody says:

    I feel like I need to see this one

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