Jane Austen, or The Secret of Style PDF/EPUB ô

Jane Austen, or The Secret of Style PDF/EPUB ô


Jane Austen, or The Secret of Style [KINDLE] ❃ Jane Austen, or The Secret of Style ❧ D.A. Miller – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk What is the world historical importance of Jane Austen An old maid writes with the detachment of a god Here the stigmatized condition of a spinster; there a writer's uneualled display of absolute impe or The MOBI ï What is the world historical importance of Jane Austen An old maid writes with the detachment of a god Here the stigmatized condition of a spinster; there a writer's uneualled display of Austen, or The Secret of Kindle - absolute impersonal authority In between the secret work of Austen's style to keep at bay the social doom that would follow if she ever wrote as the person she isFor no Jane Austen could ever appear in Jane Austen Amid happy wives and pathetic old maids Jane Austen, MOBI :Þ we see no successfully unmarried woman and despite the multitude of girls seeking to acuire accomplishments no artist either What does appear is a ghostly No One a narrative voice unmarked by age gender marital status all the particulars that make a person and might make a person peculiar The Austen heroine must suppress her wit to become the one and not the other to become that is a person fit to be tied in a conjugal knot But Austen, or The PDF/EPUB ì for herself Austen refuses personhood with all its constraints and needs and disappears into the sourceless anonymity of her style Though often treasured for its universality that style marks the specific impasse of a writer whose self representation is impossible without the prospect of shameDA Miller argues this case not only through the close reading that Austen's style always demands but also through the close writing the slavish imitation that it sometimes inspires.

  • Paperback
  • 108 pages
  • Jane Austen, or The Secret of Style
  • D.A. Miller
  • English
  • 06 December 2016
  • 9780691123875

9 thoughts on “Jane Austen, or The Secret of Style

  1. Sherwood Smith Sherwood Smith says:

    This is a very short book extremely well written dense with fascinating thought Disuieting thought even as I find myself wanting to explain excuse make everything nice when he discusses the comfortable het world’s assumptions about Austen's books from a non het POV Like his analysis of the Famous First Sentence in PP Like this bit Miller brings up When Mr Knightley pronounces Frank Churckill’s script “like a woman’s writing” even the women he is addressing Emma and Mrs Weston leap to vindicate it against what they consider a “base aspersion”Whoa We don't want Frank being thought one of those kind of men do weMiller opens with a description of those who discover Austen at a very early age Then comes this provocative statement Yet sooner or later this experience of reading Jane Austen found itself contradicted felt itself disabled by the uite different experience of being read reading her If the one moment private and elective united us all in common ecstacy the other public and compulsory brought alienation into our midst the mutual alienation of “girls and “boys” For eventually whether the “event” followed on our raptures or occurred even before they had commenced with trauma who can be certain of seuence? popular opinion let us know that what should have sundered us from all identifying labels had in fact glued onto us one in particular in short that what we took for Style everyone else took for WomanAnd later on But the same discovery that sometimes even despite herself made a good girl good made the boy all wrong Plied with a Style whose unknown strength went straight to his head he had fancied himself conuering the world with his swank Excalibur; now he woke to sobering sounds of derision and found that during his intoxication just as Lydia Bennet had done to another would be soldier in Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen had put him in a dressGender politics and Austen eh? I don’t know that men whether gay or straight now get castigated for a taste in Austen the way Miller describes but his following observations about the gay man reading Austen and finding all the jabs and prickles of the het world’s view of Austen’s place in literature jabbing him back into his closet make one take a good hard look not just at Austen but at the experience of reading and how ‘one is being read’Here’s the opening blurb on the back of the book “What is the world historical importance of Jane Austen? An old maid writes with the detachment of a god Here the stigmatized condition of a spinster; there a writer’s uneualled display of absolute impersonal authority In between the secret work of Austen’s style to keep at bay the social doom that would follow if she ever wrote as the person she isThat encapsulates the failure of Millar's central point which I think anyway overlooks the rational detachment of late Enlightenment writers Austen and her family were not romantics they did not succumb to effusions of emotion Irony and wit kept a uill's distance from unpalatable subjects but that was balanced by her bewitching sympathy for women and her insight into characterI don't see any sign in any of her works that she was ashamed of her spinsterhood On the contrary there is just the smallest sign of evidence in the later books and in the few letters that Cassandra left us that she may well at least later in her life have considered spinsterhood a lucky escape in particular in phrases like her comment about her sister in law pregnant yet again Poor animal She certainly saw plenty of the mortality of childbirth and the constant fatigue and worry of motherhood and how there was basically no escape if you were marriedThat aside Millar's book is intelligent and thought provoking which far too many books about Austen aren't

  2. Madelyn Neal Madelyn Neal says:

    The beauty of Style I have claimed lies in the way it shuts out the world that would otherwise shut out the stylotheteMiller presents complex and confusing arguments and definitely aren't undoubtable

  3. Éowyn Éowyn says:

    Yes still as turgid and self satisfied as when I previously waded through thisMust actually get rid of it this time and remind self not to re read things you have rated two stars

  4. Anita Anita says:

    I’m not sure I got the point of this essay I’ll revisit after seminar tonight

  5. Abby Abby says:

    Unexpectedly great

  6. Jee Koh Jee Koh says:

    Miller's book length essay is a delightful and thought provoking read Its thesis is that the heart of Austen's style lies in a failed or refused but in any case shameful relation to the conjugal imperative To obliterate the signs of a shameful spinsterhood she adopts a style that polishes all human particularities from the narrator's voice and achieves a kind of impersonal ironic universal objectivity But the escape into style Miller contends will still leave traces of the personal The first part of the essay Secret Love supports the thesis by reading allegorically an episode from Sense and Sensibility Miller acknowledges that allegory is rare in Austen but argues persuasively for the usefulness of such a reading of the Dashwoods' visit to Gray's the London jewelry shop where they see Robert Ferrars selecting a toothpick case Jewelry pervasive in Austen is always either given by a relative or lover in token of union through marriage or common blood The jeweled case so fussily selected by the unheterosexual Ferrars does not signify any attachment to marriage or family; it is style for style's sake The spinster like the homosexual does not possess social signification of the sort granted to married men and women Or as Miller puts itBehind the glory of style's willed evacuation of substance lies the ignominy of a subject's hopelessly insufficient social realization just as behind style's ahistorical impersonality lies the historical impasse of someone whose social representation doubles for social humiliation Miller points out that the realism of Austen's works allows no one like Jane Austen to appear in them There are happy wives and pathetic old maids but there are no successfully unmarried woman The second part of the essay No One Is Alone argues that Austen's style presupposes and enforces its author's own under representability It looks at the insufficient Neuter of a narrator in Northanger Abbey and then the accomplished Neuter in Pride and Prejudice and Emma In the mature novels the heroines employ their wit or style to court men's attention and their fall accompanied by self lacerations about their excessive wit is rewarded by getting the man they want as well as the marriage state and estate; they become recognized by society as Persons The plot is saved from cynicism by the heroines' naivete and good faith Austen Style not only knew whereof it spoke but also spoke without any apparent experiential implication in such knowledge writes Miller It is a paradox of divine omniscience but it is also a paradox of divine melancholy in which an impersonal deity unceasingly contemplates the Person that is its own absolutely foregone possibility In the third and final part of the essay Miller expands on this divine melancholy by examining the free indirect style in Emma He finds the eponymous character the most fully realized in Austen's oeuvre The chapter Broken Art also judges Persuasion a failure of Style as constituted in the earlier books since there Style becomes personifiable idiosyncratic instead of objective Sanditon written when Austen was dying is read as a crumbling of the Style when wit deteriorates into mere wordplay and alliteration Emma allows us to envision the utopia of a double perfection the perfection of Style matched by that of Person; Sanditon reaches towards the perhaps feasible state of their double their simultaneous annihilation

  7. Nikolina Hatton Nikolina Hatton says:

    I think it's possible to give a book five stars without necessarily agreeing with all of its conclusionspremises Some might see this as an insensitive portrayal of Austen the spinster narrator; however I think there is to the essay than that and if you read it you'll see why Intriguing provocative and painfully well written you can tell that Style is an object close to Miller's heart that he has sensed it in Austen and this essay is his desperate attempt to comprehend it Especially the opening of the essay reads like a love letter to Austen Style than a piece of criticism Miller obviously takes a cue from Barthes to the effect that I found reading this to be pleasure itself Even if Austen is not close to your heart read this as an example of literary criticism that takes risks and creates something magnificent in itself in the process

  8. michelle michelle says:

    Many of Miller's claims were sound to me but I had some issues with his habit of relating Jane Austen's authorial voice with her biographical position as an unmarried woman

  9. Devoney Looser Devoney Looser says:

    I've had the pleasure of reviewing this book Looser Devoney Rev of Jane Austen or The Secret of Style by D A Miller JASNA News 202 2004 16–17 Print

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9 thoughts on “Jane Austen, or The Secret of Style

  1. Sherwood Smith Sherwood Smith says:

    This is a very short book extremely well written dense with fascinating thought Disuieting thought even as I find myself wanting to explain excuse make everything nice when he discusses the comfortable het world’s assumptions about Austen's books from a non het POV Like his analysis of the Famous First Sentence in PP Like this bit Miller brings up When Mr Knightley pronounces Frank Churckill’s script “like a woman’s writing” even the women he is addressing Emma and Mrs Weston leap to vindicate it against what they consider a “base aspersion”Whoa We don't want Frank being thought one of those kind of men do weMiller opens with a description of those who discover Austen at a very early age Then comes this provocative statement Yet sooner or later this experience of reading Jane Austen found itself contradicted felt itself disabled by the uite different experience of being read reading her If the one moment private and elective united us all in common ecstacy the other public and compulsory brought alienation into our midst the mutual alienation of “girls and “boys” For eventually whether the “event” followed on our raptures or occurred even before they had commenced with trauma who can be certain of seuence? popular opinion let us know that what should have sundered us from all identifying labels had in fact glued onto us one in particular in short that what we took for Style everyone else took for WomanAnd later on But the same discovery that sometimes even despite herself made a good girl good made the boy all wrong Plied with a Style whose unknown strength went straight to his head he had fancied himself conuering the world with his swank Excalibur; now he woke to sobering sounds of derision and found that during his intoxication just as Lydia Bennet had done to another would be soldier in Pride and Prejudice Jane Austen had put him in a dressGender politics and Austen eh? I don’t know that men whether gay or straight now get castigated for a taste in Austen the way Miller describes but his following observations about the gay man reading Austen and finding all the jabs and prickles of the het world’s view of Austen’s place in literature jabbing him back into his closet make one take a good hard look not just at Austen but at the experience of reading and how ‘one is being read’Here’s the opening blurb on the back of the book “What is the world historical importance of Jane Austen? An old maid writes with the detachment of a god Here the stigmatized condition of a spinster; there a writer’s uneualled display of absolute impersonal authority In between the secret work of Austen’s style to keep at bay the social doom that would follow if she ever wrote as the person she isThat encapsulates the failure of Millar's central point which I think anyway overlooks the rational detachment of late Enlightenment writers Austen and her family were not romantics they did not succumb to effusions of emotion Irony and wit kept a uill's distance from unpalatable subjects but that was balanced by her bewitching sympathy for women and her insight into characterI don't see any sign in any of her works that she was ashamed of her spinsterhood On the contrary there is just the smallest sign of evidence in the later books and in the few letters that Cassandra left us that she may well at least later in her life have considered spinsterhood a lucky escape in particular in phrases like her comment about her sister in law pregnant yet again Poor animal She certainly saw plenty of the mortality of childbirth and the constant fatigue and worry of motherhood and how there was basically no escape if you were marriedThat aside Millar's book is intelligent and thought provoking which far too many books about Austen aren't

  2. Madelyn Neal Madelyn Neal says:

    The beauty of Style I have claimed lies in the way it shuts out the world that would otherwise shut out the stylotheteMiller presents complex and confusing arguments and definitely aren't undoubtable

  3. Éowyn Éowyn says:

    Yes still as turgid and self satisfied as when I previously waded through thisMust actually get rid of it this time and remind self not to re read things you have rated two stars

  4. Anita Anita says:

    I’m not sure I got the point of this essay I’ll revisit after seminar tonight

  5. Abby Abby says:

    Unexpectedly great

  6. Jee Koh Jee Koh says:

    Miller's book length essay is a delightful and thought provoking read Its thesis is that the heart of Austen's style lies in a failed or refused but in any case shameful relation to the conjugal imperative To obliterate the signs of a shameful spinsterhood she adopts a style that polishes all human particularities from the narrator's voice and achieves a kind of impersonal ironic universal objectivity But the escape into style Miller contends will still leave traces of the personal The first part of the essay Secret Love supports the thesis by reading allegorically an episode from Sense and Sensibility Miller acknowledges that allegory is rare in Austen but argues persuasively for the usefulness of such a reading of the Dashwoods' visit to Gray's the London jewelry shop where they see Robert Ferrars selecting a toothpick case Jewelry pervasive in Austen is always either given by a relative or lover in token of union through marriage or common blood The jeweled case so fussily selected by the unheterosexual Ferrars does not signify any attachment to marriage or family; it is style for style's sake The spinster like the homosexual does not possess social signification of the sort granted to married men and women Or as Miller puts itBehind the glory of style's willed evacuation of substance lies the ignominy of a subject's hopelessly insufficient social realization just as behind style's ahistorical impersonality lies the historical impasse of someone whose social representation doubles for social humiliation Miller points out that the realism of Austen's works allows no one like Jane Austen to appear in them There are happy wives and pathetic old maids but there are no successfully unmarried woman The second part of the essay No One Is Alone argues that Austen's style presupposes and enforces its author's own under representability It looks at the insufficient Neuter of a narrator in Northanger Abbey and then the accomplished Neuter in Pride and Prejudice and Emma In the mature novels the heroines employ their wit or style to court men's attention and their fall accompanied by self lacerations about their excessive wit is rewarded by getting the man they want as well as the marriage state and estate; they become recognized by society as Persons The plot is saved from cynicism by the heroines' naivete and good faith Austen Style not only knew whereof it spoke but also spoke without any apparent experiential implication in such knowledge writes Miller It is a paradox of divine omniscience but it is also a paradox of divine melancholy in which an impersonal deity unceasingly contemplates the Person that is its own absolutely foregone possibility In the third and final part of the essay Miller expands on this divine melancholy by examining the free indirect style in Emma He finds the eponymous character the most fully realized in Austen's oeuvre The chapter Broken Art also judges Persuasion a failure of Style as constituted in the earlier books since there Style becomes personifiable idiosyncratic instead of objective Sanditon written when Austen was dying is read as a crumbling of the Style when wit deteriorates into mere wordplay and alliteration Emma allows us to envision the utopia of a double perfection the perfection of Style matched by that of Person; Sanditon reaches towards the perhaps feasible state of their double their simultaneous annihilation

  7. Nikolina Hatton Nikolina Hatton says:

    I think it's possible to give a book five stars without necessarily agreeing with all of its conclusionspremises Some might see this as an insensitive portrayal of Austen the spinster narrator; however I think there is to the essay than that and if you read it you'll see why Intriguing provocative and painfully well written you can tell that Style is an object close to Miller's heart that he has sensed it in Austen and this essay is his desperate attempt to comprehend it Especially the opening of the essay reads like a love letter to Austen Style than a piece of criticism Miller obviously takes a cue from Barthes to the effect that I found reading this to be pleasure itself Even if Austen is not close to your heart read this as an example of literary criticism that takes risks and creates something magnificent in itself in the process

  8. michelle michelle says:

    Many of Miller's claims were sound to me but I had some issues with his habit of relating Jane Austen's authorial voice with her biographical position as an unmarried woman

  9. Devoney Looser Devoney Looser says:

    I've had the pleasure of reviewing this book Looser Devoney Rev of Jane Austen or The Secret of Style by D A Miller JASNA News 202 2004 16–17 Print

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *