Jewel of the Desert: Japanese American Internment at Topaz

Jewel of the Desert: Japanese American Internment at Topaz

Jewel of the Desert: Japanese American Internment at Topaz ❴Download❵ ➵ Jewel of the Desert: Japanese American Internment at Topaz Author Sandra C. Taylor – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk In the spring of 1942 under the guise of military necessity the US government evacuated 110000 Japanese Americans from their homes on the West Coast About 7000 people from the San Francisco Bay Area†the Desert: eBook ¸ In the spring of under the guise of military necessity the US government evacuated Jewel of Kindle - Japanese Americans from their homes on the West Coast About people from the San of the Desert: PDF ✓ Francisco Bay Area—the vast majority of whom were American citizens—were moved to an assembly center at of the Desert: Japanese American PDF \ Tanforan Racetrack and then to a concentration camp in Topaz Utah Dubbed the jewel of the desert the camp remained in operation until October This compelling book tells the history of Japanese Americans of San Francisco and the Bay Area and of their experiences of relocation and internmentSandra C Taylor first examines the lives of the Japanese Americans who settled in and around San Francisco near the end of the nineteenth century As their numbers grew so too did their sense of community They were a people bound together not only by common values history and institutions but also by their shared status as outsiders Taylor looks particularly at how Japanese Americans kept their sense of community and self worth alive in spite of the upheavals of internmentThe author draws on interviews with fifty former Topaz residents and on the archives of the War Relocation Authority and newspaper reports to show how relocation and its aftermath shaped the lives of these Japanese Americans Written at a time when the United States once again regards Japan as a threat Taylor's study testifies to the ongoing effects of prejudice toward Americans whose face is also the face of the enemy.


3 thoughts on “Jewel of the Desert: Japanese American Internment at Topaz

  1. Sarah Crawford Sarah Crawford says:

    Sandra C Taylor 1993The introduction establishes the parameters of the book stating what group of Japanese Americans it deals with uses the term concentration camp to describe Topaz and establishes the authors own feelings about the internment programThe first chapter deals with the history of the Japanese settlement into the San Francisco area of California It goes into the types of businesses that the Issei and Nisei established educational problems their children ran into and the overall structure of the Japanese American community in that areaThe chapter also covers the anti immigration movement the effect of the Great Depression on the community and how the community grewThe next chapter goes into what happened after the attack on Pearl Harbor including the arrests Executive Order 9066 etcThe next chapter starts with moving people to the Tanforan Assembly Center The author points out that Tanforan was not ready at all to accept the internees as shown by the types of meals the people had to eat for the first ten days which were basically lima beans cold tea canned food stale bread boiled potatoes and canned Vienna sausage The horse stalls without roofs are described and she also points out the strong desire on the part of the Nisei to prove themselves good citizens which in itself helped stop a lot of trouble along with the fact that the JACL was being accomodationistReligious services were actually controlled as to the content Various recreational activities got underway and the leadership changed from the Issei generation to the Nisei generation Next to be gone into is the self government setup at the center Then the residents are moved to the Topaz internment campThe next chapter starts off with how the Topaz camp was constructed The nature of the camp administration is discussed and then the movement of college students into other states to continue their education The overall difficulties involved with resettlement are also discussedThe next chapter starts off talking about the schools that were set up at Topaz Discussed is the fact that the schools were not ready physically they had to shut down for a month until the schools were winterized and the uneven teacher uality Also covered is the appearance of juvenile delinuency which had not previously been any sort of a problem for Japanese American youthsThe book then goes into the killing of one of the inmates by a guard The author discusses the event in detail and particularly what followed immediately afterwards with in effect an attempt by the military to cover up what had happened and an almost complete disinterest on the part of non camp newspapers It was also apparently not the only time that sentries had fired at internees who were near the fenceA lot of time is spent on the incident a man was shot and killed when he was near the fence; he might have been trying to escape he might have been playing with a dog he might have been reaching for a flower he might have been partially deaf and never heard any warnings etc The exact circumstances of the shooting have never been definitively determinedThe loyalty uestionnaire is discussed along with the arrangement of camp politics and then the segregation of the no no's to Tule Problems of Kibei violence in beating up pro administration internees is then covered along with labor troubles at a strike at the campThe relationship of those in the camp with the nearby town of Delta are discussed and it's pointed out that basically the relationship was a good one for both sides The draft of the Nisei is then covered The author discusses what happened as and people left the camp in the last year and a half of its existence and how there were fewer people behind their attitudes were not very positive and some people were actually fearful to leave the camp and relocate to some other area of the countryThere's a lot of detail on different aspects of the camp life and the problems each was having from the hospitals through the education program which was essentially falling apart The process of actually closing the camp and the kinds of problems that caused is next to be discussedThe next chapter covers the effect of internment on the lives of the people in general and with many specific examples The problems of moving back to the West Coast are covered including the anti Japanese feelings still prevalent there An extensive notes section and bibliography followsThis is a good book with specific examples of how the camp life influenced the lives of the people there and an in depth examination of the shooting death of one internee covered in detail than I've seen elsewhere A good and interesting book


  2. J.S. J.S. says:

    Having grown up with friends who were the children or grandchildren of internees at Topaz and neighbors who may have been there as well I've wanted to read this book for uite a while Ms Taylor has managed to pull together a lot of information from sources that are becoming fewer and fewer and presents a good history of the struggles and hardships Japanese Americans especially those from the San Francisco Bay area faced during WWII Some interesting pictures are included but only a few of them were actually taken at Topaz While I appreciated the perspective gained from this book it felt like it was too long and that some of the information was repeated several times Also while it does offer bits and pieces of the experience of internees it offers little by way of substantial stories of the individuals failing to really put a face on the people The last two chapters give summary information on the post Topaz lives of several dozen internees but I wish it had been written into the rest of the book which could have made it readable and would have eliminated much of the repetition I also felt that it failed to adeuately comment on the perspective and feelings of the Japanese Americans other than vague generalities regarding certain events of the war such as the bombing of Pearl Harbor and dropping the Atomic bombs on Japan In that way it comes across as feeling very academic as opposed to personal My biggest complaint however was with the regular and heavy emphasis particularly in the beginning on caucasion racism as if no other race was capable or guilty of discriminating another As such it's a rather myopic view of history but it's still valuable and interesting when taken with the whole


  3. Sarah Sarah says:

    It was ok couldn't tell if she argued anything


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3 thoughts on “Jewel of the Desert: Japanese American Internment at Topaz

  1. Sarah Crawford Sarah Crawford says:

    Sandra C Taylor 1993The introduction establishes the parameters of the book stating what group of Japanese Americans it deals with uses the term concentration camp to describe Topaz and establishes the authors own feelings about the internment programThe first chapter deals with the history of the Japanese settlement into the San Francisco area of California It goes into the types of businesses that the Issei and Nisei established educational problems their children ran into and the overall structure of the Japanese American community in that areaThe chapter also covers the anti immigration movement the effect of the Great Depression on the community and how the community grewThe next chapter goes into what happened after the attack on Pearl Harbor including the arrests Executive Order 9066 etcThe next chapter starts with moving people to the Tanforan Assembly Center The author points out that Tanforan was not ready at all to accept the internees as shown by the types of meals the people had to eat for the first ten days which were basically lima beans cold tea canned food stale bread boiled potatoes and canned Vienna sausage The horse stalls without roofs are described and she also points out the strong desire on the part of the Nisei to prove themselves good citizens which in itself helped stop a lot of trouble along with the fact that the JACL was being accomodationistReligious services were actually controlled as to the content Various recreational activities got underway and the leadership changed from the Issei generation to the Nisei generation Next to be gone into is the self government setup at the center Then the residents are moved to the Topaz internment campThe next chapter starts off with how the Topaz camp was constructed The nature of the camp administration is discussed and then the movement of college students into other states to continue their education The overall difficulties involved with resettlement are also discussedThe next chapter starts off talking about the schools that were set up at Topaz Discussed is the fact that the schools were not ready physically they had to shut down for a month until the schools were winterized and the uneven teacher uality Also covered is the appearance of juvenile delinuency which had not previously been any sort of a problem for Japanese American youthsThe book then goes into the killing of one of the inmates by a guard The author discusses the event in detail and particularly what followed immediately afterwards with in effect an attempt by the military to cover up what had happened and an almost complete disinterest on the part of non camp newspapers It was also apparently not the only time that sentries had fired at internees who were near the fenceA lot of time is spent on the incident a man was shot and killed when he was near the fence; he might have been trying to escape he might have been playing with a dog he might have been reaching for a flower he might have been partially deaf and never heard any warnings etc The exact circumstances of the shooting have never been definitively determinedThe loyalty uestionnaire is discussed along with the arrangement of camp politics and then the segregation of the no no's to Tule Problems of Kibei violence in beating up pro administration internees is then covered along with labor troubles at a strike at the campThe relationship of those in the camp with the nearby town of Delta are discussed and it's pointed out that basically the relationship was a good one for both sides The draft of the Nisei is then covered The author discusses what happened as and people left the camp in the last year and a half of its existence and how there were fewer people behind their attitudes were not very positive and some people were actually fearful to leave the camp and relocate to some other area of the countryThere's a lot of detail on different aspects of the camp life and the problems each was having from the hospitals through the education program which was essentially falling apart The process of actually closing the camp and the kinds of problems that caused is next to be discussedThe next chapter covers the effect of internment on the lives of the people in general and with many specific examples The problems of moving back to the West Coast are covered including the anti Japanese feelings still prevalent there An extensive notes section and bibliography followsThis is a good book with specific examples of how the camp life influenced the lives of the people there and an in depth examination of the shooting death of one internee covered in detail than I've seen elsewhere A good and interesting book

  2. J.S. J.S. says:

    Having grown up with friends who were the children or grandchildren of internees at Topaz and neighbors who may have been there as well I've wanted to read this book for uite a while Ms Taylor has managed to pull together a lot of information from sources that are becoming fewer and fewer and presents a good history of the struggles and hardships Japanese Americans especially those from the San Francisco Bay area faced during WWII Some interesting pictures are included but only a few of them were actually taken at Topaz While I appreciated the perspective gained from this book it felt like it was too long and that some of the information was repeated several times Also while it does offer bits and pieces of the experience of internees it offers little by way of substantial stories of the individuals failing to really put a face on the people The last two chapters give summary information on the post Topaz lives of several dozen internees but I wish it had been written into the rest of the book which could have made it readable and would have eliminated much of the repetition I also felt that it failed to adeuately comment on the perspective and feelings of the Japanese Americans other than vague generalities regarding certain events of the war such as the bombing of Pearl Harbor and dropping the Atomic bombs on Japan In that way it comes across as feeling very academic as opposed to personal My biggest complaint however was with the regular and heavy emphasis particularly in the beginning on caucasion racism as if no other race was capable or guilty of discriminating another As such it's a rather myopic view of history but it's still valuable and interesting when taken with the whole

  3. Sarah Sarah says:

    It was ok couldn't tell if she argued anything

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