The Gay Science Kindle ↠ The Gay PDF or

The Gay Science Kindle ↠ The Gay PDF or


    Load results Apple Footer Apple Support novel was published in April st , and was written by Friedrich Nietzsche The book was published in multiple languages including English, consists ofpages and is available in Mass Market Paperback format The Gay Science YouTube The Gay Science Friedrich Nietzsche FULL AudioBook Part by AudioBookBuzzLanguage English Location United States Restricted Mode Off History Help AboutThe Gay Science Free Gay Chat The Gay Science is an extensive and sophisticated treatment of the philosophical themes and views which were most central to Nietzsche s own thought and which have been most influential on later thinkers This volume presents the work in a new translation, with a Jun ,The Paperback of the The Gay Science With a Prelude in Rhymes and an Appendix of Songs by Friedrich Nietzsche atNietzsche The Gay Science With a Prelude in Nietzsche wrote The Gay Science, which he later described as perhaps my most personal book , when he was at the height of his intellectual powers, and the reader will find in it an extensive and sophisticated treatment of the philosophical themes and views which were most central to Nietzsche s own thought and which have been most influential on later thinkers The Gay Science Summary GradeSaver The Gay Science concludes with one of the most famous vignettes from Nietzsche s early writings The parable of the madman as the passage has been called is about an insane man who walks into a town holding a candle, though it s midday on a sunny day The townsmen gather, and the madman declares that we ourselves have killed God The Gay Science Intimate Experiments With the Problem ofGay Science is dedicatedWorking at the centre opened my eyes to the world of empirical HIV research and its connection to HIV education, programming and policy I came from a background in literary studies, philosophy and social semiotics and had virtually no experience of empirical research What had attracted me to NCSHR was its focus on social and sexual practices, rather thanThe Gay Science Summary and Study Guide The Gay Science is a book of poems and collection ofaphorisms in five sections that interrogates the origins of the history of knowledge It celebrates philosophy as a medicine capable of renewing the intellect, and perceives of philosophy as inspiration for individual freedom, and thereby capable of renewing culture."/>
  • Mass Market Paperback
  • 398 pages
  • The Gay Science
  • Friedrich Nietzsche
  • English
  • 16 September 2019
  • 0394719859

10 thoughts on “The Gay Science

  1. Zawn V Zawn V says:

    If you read Nietzsche while not in the midst of some variety of emo existential crisis, Nietzsche is hilarious and insightful If, however, you choose to read Nietzsche in high school in order to be counter culture, odds are good Nietzsche will temporarily turn you into a horrible, pompous ass Nietzsche is the first philosopher I ever read I stole The Gay Science from my cousin s book shelf when I was nine because I wanted to read what smart people read Ever since then, Nietzsche and I have If you read Nietzsche while not in the midst of some variety of emo existential crisis, Nietzsche is hilarious and insightful If, however, you choose to read Nietzsche in high school in order to be counter culture, odds are good Nietzsche will temporarily turn you into a horrible, pompous ass Nietzsche is the first philosopher I ever read I stole The Gay Science from my cousin s book shelf when I was nine because I wanted to read what smart people read Ever since then, Nietzsche and I have had a love affair the problem is that I cannot stand his fans I imagine this review will not be useful to most people, but if you ve encountered the Nietzsche bots, you know exactly what I am talking about


  2. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    Die fr hliche Wissenschaft The Gay Science, Friedrich NietzscheThe Gay Science or The Joyful Wisdom is a book by Friedrich Nietzsche, first published in 1882 and followed by a second edition, which was published after the completion of Thus Spoke Zarathustra and Beyond Good and Evil, in 1887 This substantial expansion includes a fifth book and an appendix of songs It was noted by Nietzsche to be the most personal of all his books , and contains the greatest number of poems in any of his p Die fr hliche Wissenschaft The Gay Science, Friedrich NietzscheThe Gay Science or The Joyful Wisdom is a book by Friedrich Nietzsche, first published in 1882 and followed by a second edition, which was published after the completion of Thus Spoke Zarathustra and Beyond Good and Evil, in 1887 This substantial expansion includes a fifth book and an appendix of songs It was noted by Nietzsche to be the most personal of all his books , and contains the greatest number of poems in any of his published works 2006 1377 9645620414 1380 1385 1388 978964620414 1389 1392 191882


  3. Roy Lotz Roy Lotz says:

    Themistrust, thephilosophy. How to review Nietzsche His writing is so rich, so overabundant, so overflowing, that evaluating his works is like trying to drink up a waterfall I cannot even decide whether Nietzsche was a philosopher, or something else Perhaps he can be better described as an essayist, a poet, a sage, a neurotic, a raving madman, a prescient visionary The title hardly matters, I suppose although without some benchmark of comparison, I am left in the dark for a w Themistrust, thephilosophy. How to review Nietzsche His writing is so rich, so overabundant, so overflowing, that evaluating his works is like trying to drink up a waterfall I cannot even decide whether Nietzsche was a philosopher, or something else Perhaps he can be better described as an essayist, a poet, a sage, a neurotic, a raving madman, a prescient visionary The title hardly matters, I suppose although without some benchmark of comparison, I am left in the dark for a way to measure Nietzsche and his writings The only way open I can see is to weigh Nietzsche against himself In the context of his full corpus, The Gay Science is easily one of Nietzsche s strongest works It dates from his middle period, after his break with Wagner and his renunciation of Schopenhauer, when he was still developing his most characteristic ideas Indeed, in this book one finds Nietzsche s first proclamation that God is dead, as well as the first mention of the Eternal Recurrence Many of Nietzsche s criticisms of science, humanism, liberalism, and above all morality can be found in nascent form in these pages, to befully developed in Beyond Good and Evil and The Genealogy of Morals Nietzsche s central project, put briefly, was to set about questioning the fundamental values and assumptions of Western history Many of these he traces back to Socrates, whom Nietzsche regards with a mix of admiration and horror In the works of Plato, Socrates is turned into an ideal he is coldly logical, scorning all sensations and emotions he holds that our everyday world is less worthy than the world beyond that art is not a source of knowledge or wisdom, but a mere beguilement of the senses that contemplation is better than action that peacefulness is better than passion that moral behavior leads to happiness This collection of doctrines, Nietzsche believes, was transformed into Christianity, which added what Nietzsche later referred to as a slave morality the praise of meekness, pity, kindness, gentleness, compassion, common in Christian preaching Nietzsche struggled for years to extricate himself from this morass, and in the process developed one of his faculties to the utmost perfection his suspicion Nietzsche suspected every received idea, automatic impulse, longstanding tradition, comforting thought, pleasant assumption, common opinion In this way, he hoped to disentangle himself from the spider s web and to see the world with a new clarity of vision If one would like to see our European morality for once as it looks for a distance, and if one would like to measure it against other moralities, past and future, then one has to proceed like a wanderer who wants to know how high the towers in the town are he leaves the town But it is no easy thing to leave one s entire society and culture behind, and to see it from a distance Perhaps it can t be done Nietzsche tried, first, by isolating himself physically, leading a solitary life away from friends and family, living off his pension from his time in the University of Basel From this vantage point, Nietzsche started to take aim at Western culture, as he perceived it This project was obviously not one of system building at least, not at first but of assault Nietzsche aimed to think outside of any system, to dance constantly on shifting ground, taking no assumption as a starting point, mistrustful of all impulses towards conventional opinion This, I think, is why Nietzsche wrote in aphorisms he needed to retreat quickly from his forays, so as not to get drawn back into the assumptions he was trying to criticize For I approach deep problems like cold baths quickly into them, and quickly out again Nietzsche felt that this job was not only important, but of historical significance This is because of his famous proclamation that God is dead or, in other words, that the idea of God was no longer taken seriously Nietzsche meant this not only intellectually, but also aesthetically What is not decisive against Christianity is our taste, no longer our reasons In other words, the old worldview was not only intellectually bankrupt, but not even pleasing any But the death of God was not an isolated event it marked a decisive transition in culture So many of our basic assumptions, about truth, morality, justice, and life, are based on the Christian worldview Without the support of this worldview, people would begin to see these assumptions as mere prejudices Indeed, our dependence on Christian assumptions is one of the things that Nietzsche most delighted in pointing out For example, the idea that truth isvaluable than appearance is a prejudice that originates in the old belief that all truth came from God The modern idea that every person is equal and deserves the same rights comes from the idea that everyone is equal in the eyes of God As is well known, Nietzsche eventually called himself Anti Christ, but his opposition to Christianity had nothing in common with Richard Dawkin s or Bertrand Russell s, who both opposed Christianity because it didn t hold up under logical scrutiny Rather, Nietzsche found Christianity distasteful because he perceived it as being life denying Christianity is a religion that considers humankind inherently sinful, and all bodily pleasures disgraceful a religion that decries this earthly life ugly and miserable, and places its hopes in the afterlife a religion that celebrates the virtues of weakness compassion for the sick, gentleness to your fellows, meekness in the face of an almighty God All of this, Nietzsche considers to be anti life a sick yearning for death For Nietzsche, Christianity was an attempt by people with weak bodies and unhealthy minds to impose their ailment on the rest of humanity a system created by feeble and miserable people to drag the rest of humanity down to their level Against this, Nietzsche proclaims a life affirming philosophy What this exactly entails is hard to say, but the fundamental doctrine is amor fati, or love of fate For Nietzsche, the ideal was to love your life so fully that you could wish to relive it over and over again, endlessly repeating the same actions This is the famous Eternal Recurrence.Personally, I find it all but impossible to discuss Nietzsche s ideas without discussing his life and his personality First, it is worth noting that Nietzsche was a sickly person, suffering from an acutely painful disease syphilis for his whole adult life Thus the question of philosophy being anti life or life affirming was a personal one for Nietzsche he wanted to rise above his own pain, to resist the urge to denigrate life because of his own suffering, and instead to cultivate a joyful wisdom Thus his philosophy was deeply personal, and we get a large dose of his personality in his writings Nietzsche was obviously a profoundly introverted man indeed, he was so introverted that he often mistook himself for the universe He was constitutionally incapable of being a good scholar he could not for a moment put his own prejudices aside and attempt neutrality Instead, Nietzsche treats the world as a kind of backdrop to his thoughts, payingattention to his opinions about things than to the things themselves He has such startling and original opinions that, most often, this is an exhilarating experience but this also leads Nietzsche into many statements that are obviously absurd and empirically false What is , Nietzsche s profound introversion eventually, and perhaps inevitably, turned into a profound narcissism that blackens his later writings As I said above, Nietzsche s strongest and most versatile weapon was his suspicion Most often, his deep mistrust allowed him to reach striking conclusions But occasionally his suspicion veers into cynicism, and cynicism is not an attractive quality The combination of this cynicism and his narcissism sometimes led Nietzsche into stupidity, such as his many idiotic comments about women These qualities also led Nietzsche to many positions that I, and most others nowadays, consider reactionary in the extreme and elitist beyond measure He is full of insults for the herd of humanity, the rabble, the stupid masses And his criticisms of conventional morality sometimes led Nietzsche to vicious conclusions Who will attain anything great if he does not find in himself the strength and the will to inflict great sufferingBeing able to suffer is the least thing weak women and even slaves often achieve virtuosity in that But not to perish of internal distress and uncertainty when one inflicts great suffering and hears the cry of this suffering that is great, that belongs to greatness.But as unattractive as Nietzsche s personality can be, and as unpalatable as some of his conclusions were, I still love his books Simply as a writer of prose, Nietzsche is in the first class his prose is fire made articulate More than that, his books are so full of ideas, so rich, so overabundant, so overflowing his mind was so nimble, his personality so strange, his conclusions so original, that you cannot help but come away with your brain buzzing with inspiration


  4. David David says:

    NOT GAY ENOUGH.


  5. Jonfaith Jonfaith says:

    For believe me the secret for harvesting from existence the greatest fruitfulness and the greatest enjoyment is to live dangerously Build your cities on the slopes of Vesuvius Send your ships into uncharted seas Live at war with your peers and yourselves Be robbers and conquerors as long as you cannot be rulers and possessors, you seekers of knowledge Soon the age will be past when you could be content to live hidden in forests like shy deer While this wasn t my point of departure into For believe me the secret for harvesting from existence the greatest fruitfulness and the greatest enjoyment is to live dangerously Build your cities on the slopes of Vesuvius Send your ships into uncharted seas Live at war with your peers and yourselves Be robbers and conquerors as long as you cannot be rulers and possessors, you seekers of knowledge Soon the age will be past when you could be content to live hidden in forests like shy deer While this wasn t my point of departure into Theory, though it should ve been Ideas bubbled and grew fecund in my youthful soul Pints of Carlsburg and shit food from Hardees nourshed my wretched body, but it was Nietzsche s frisson which propelled me forward


  6. Martin Martin says:

    What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you in your loneliest loneliness and say to you This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live onceand innumerable timesand there will be nothing new in it, but every pain and every joy and every thought and sigh and everything unutterably small or great in your life will have to return to you, all in the same succession and sequence even this spider and this moonlight between the trees, and even this m What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you in your loneliest loneliness and say to you This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live onceand innumerable timesand there will be nothing new in it, but every pain and every joy and every thought and sigh and everything unutterably small or great in your life will have to return to you, all in the same succession and sequence even this spider and this moonlight between the trees, and even this moment and I myself The eternal hourglass of existence is turned upside down again and again and you with it, speck of dust Would you not throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse the demon who spoke thus Or have you once experienced a tremendous moment when you would have answered him You are a god and never have I heard anythingdivine If this thought gained possession of you, it would change you as you are or perhaps crush you the question in each and every thing, Do you desire this once , and innumerable timeswould lie upon your actions as the greatest weight Or how well disposed would you have to become to yourself and to life to crave nothingfervently than this ultimate eternal confirmation and seal Nietzche is a genius


  7. Prickle Prickle says:

    Perhaps one of the greatest passages I encountered here has the unconventional form of a short parable, or psychologist s tale that almost doesin two paragraphs than an entire novella, and reminds me much of Johann Peter HebelIn dealings with people who are ashamed of their feelings, one must be able to disguise one s own for such people take a sudden antipathy to anyone who catches them in a moment of tenderness, or enthusiasm, or intemperate rage, as if their deepest secrets had bee Perhaps one of the greatest passages I encountered here has the unconventional form of a short parable, or psychologist s tale that almost doesin two paragraphs than an entire novella, and reminds me much of Johann Peter HebelIn dealings with people who are ashamed of their feelings, one must be able to disguise one s own for such people take a sudden antipathy to anyone who catches them in a moment of tenderness, or enthusiasm, or intemperate rage, as if their deepest secrets had been discovered If one wants to do them a kindness in such moments one should make them laugh, and utter some cold, cruel witticism then their heart turns to ice, and they regain self possession But I am giving you the moral before the story.There was a time in our lives when we had grown so close to one another in friendship and brotherhood that nothing seemed to stand between us except this little footbridge Just as you were about to step upon it, I asked you Do you want to cross this bridge to me But then you no longer wanted to, and when I asked you again, you fell silent Since then mountains and torrents and all that divides and estranges have come between us, and even if we wanted to be reconciled with one another, it was no longer possible However, when you think back to that little footbridge, you are at a loss for words but filled with tears and wonder Much of Nietzsche s aphorisms or rather passages that implicitly make up a whole here take on a poetic form that are rhythmic and conversational without completely jumping the ship of non fiction like Thus Spoke Zarathustra, and in this style The Joyous Science appear wholly unique and vivifying to a modern weary and logical mind in what is otherwise an ocean of grays and blues in writing Take it from the author himself, howeverIt is noteworthy that the great masters of prose have almost always been poets, either openly, or secretly for their own private enjoyment and truly, good prose is written only in light of poetry For prose is the result of an uninterrupted, polite war with poetry all its charm consists in the fact that poetry is constantly avoided and contradicted every abstraction wishes to be presented as a piece of roguishness against poetry and with mocking voice all dryness and coolness is supposed to drive the lovely goddess to lovely despair often there are momentary compromises and reconciliations between the two, and then a sudden rebound into laughter often the curtain is drawn back and harsh light let in just when the goddess was enjoying her twilights and dull colours often her words are taken from her mouth and sung to a melody which makes her hold her delicate hands over her delicate ears and so there are a thousand pleasures to this war, the defeats very much included, of which the unpoetic, the so called prose writers, know nothing which is why they write and speak only bad prose Now that I have been so soundly trounced, and seeing that against my better judgement I have unwittingly mentioned Hebel above without sparing him a single thought for almost exactly a year until now, I wonder if I might better occupy my time Walter Benjamin like with constructing my reviews solely out of quotations from now on


  8. Summer Summer says:

    Epic Nietzsche My favorite Nietzsche text and Nietzsche is my most favorite thinking creature of all time, so this means a lot somehow managing to be provocative, meditative, accessible, and entertaining in one stroke One of those rare books that you can actually pick up, flip to any page, and read, without wondering all that much about what came before I utilized many ideas presented in this book as jumping off points in my master s thesis, and were it not for the constrictions of time, Epic Nietzsche My favorite Nietzsche text and Nietzsche is my most favorite thinking creature of all time, so this means a lot somehow managing to be provocative, meditative, accessible, and entertaining in one stroke One of those rare books that you can actually pick up, flip to any page, and read, without wondering all that much about what came before I utilized many ideas presented in this book as jumping off points in my master s thesis, and were it not for the constrictions of time, space, and let s face it my will, I happily would have drawn on itI ve read it so many times that my copy is torn, taped, and in a general state of overused disarray, a testimony to its lasting effect on me The Gay Science has taken me on seriously remote journeys aboard my own train of thought , wherein I have found myself fantasizing about my dormant inner ubermensch in all of its crazed dancing and laughing glory Always a good time Especially for an aphorism junky


  9. Jack Jack says:

    384.Having finished the book, the reader had no choice but to read himself It was not a heroic story, nor a moral one indeed, he scarcely understood the author s intent in various chapters Its ending was implicit, if unwritten, yet the reader did not wish to imagine exactly what it would be Oftentimes it was tedious, not worth reading, and he continued partially from spite, for he did not put a book down easily, and partially from a deeper sense he could not ascribe words to a vibrancy, so 384.Having finished the book, the reader had no choice but to read himself It was not a heroic story, nor a moral one indeed, he scarcely understood the author s intent in various chapters Its ending was implicit, if unwritten, yet the reader did not wish to imagine exactly what it would be Oftentimes it was tedious, not worth reading, and he continued partially from spite, for he did not put a book down easily, and partially from a deeper sense he could not ascribe words to a vibrancy, something musical that would arrive and depart from his consciousness at the behest of an obscure whim And it made him laugh, suddenly and gaily and with honesty, as he sat alone in his room


  10. Karl Hallbjörnsson Karl Hallbjörnsson says:

    Best Nietzsche I ve read so far Kaufmann s annotation is extremely informative, insightful and at times quite hilarious Onwards to Zarathustra, then Edit been reading it again this year I m convinced that this is N s singular best work A real masterpiece.


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The Gay Science[Download] ➹ The Gay Science By Friedrich Nietzsche – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk The Gay Science With a Prelude in Rhymes andNietzsche called The Gay Science the most personal of all my books It was here that he first proclaimed the death of God to which a large part of the book T The Gay Science With a Prelude in Rhymes andNietzsche called The Gay Science the most personal of all my books It was here that he first proclaimed the death of God to which a large part of the book The Gay Science by Friedrich Nietzsche Goodreads The Gay Science or The Joyful Wisdom is a book by Friedrich Nietzsche, first published inand followed The Gay PDF or by a second edition, which was published after the completion of Thus Spoke Zarathustra and Beyond Good and Evil, inThis substantial expansion includes PDF The Gay Science Book by Friedrich Nietzsche Free download or read online The Gay Science pdf ePUB book The first edition of the novel was published in April st , and was written by Friedrich Nietzsche The book was published in multiple languages including English, consists ofpages and is available in Mass Market Paperback format The Gay Science YouTube The Gay Science Friedrich Nietzsche FULL AudioBook Part by AudioBookBuzzLanguage English Location United States Restricted Mode Off History Help AboutThe Gay Science Free Gay Chat The Gay Science is an extensive and sophisticated treatment of the philosophical themes and views which were most central to Nietzsche s own thought and which have been most influential on later thinkers This volume presents the work in a new translation, with a Jun ,The Paperback of the The Gay Science With a Prelude in Rhymes and an Appendix of Songs by Friedrich Nietzsche atNietzsche The Gay Science With a Prelude in Nietzsche wrote The Gay Science, which he later described as perhaps my most personal book , when he was at the height of his intellectual powers, and the reader will find in it an extensive and sophisticated treatment of the philosophical themes and views which were most central to Nietzsche s own thought and which have been most influential on later thinkers The Gay Science Summary GradeSaver The Gay Science concludes with one of the most famous vignettes from Nietzsche s early writings The parable of the madman as the passage has been called is about an insane man who walks into a town holding a candle, though it s midday on a sunny day The townsmen gather, and the madman declares that we ourselves have killed God The Gay Science Intimate Experiments With the Problem ofGay Science is dedicatedWorking at the centre opened my eyes to the world of empirical HIV research and its connection to HIV education, programming and policy I came from a background in literary studies, philosophy and social semiotics and had virtually no experience of empirical research What had attracted me to NCSHR was its focus on social and sexual practices, rather thanThe Gay Science Summary and Study Guide The Gay Science is a book of poems and collection ofaphorisms in five sections that interrogates the origins of the history of knowledge It celebrates philosophy as a medicine capable of renewing the intellect, and perceives of philosophy as inspiration for individual freedom, and thereby capable of renewing culture.


About the Author: Friedrich Nietzsche

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was a German philosopher of the late th century who challenged the foundations of Christianity and traditional morality He was interested in the enhancement of individual and cultural health, and believed in life, creativity, power, and the realities of the world we live in, rather than those situated in a world beyond Central to his philosophy is the idea of The Gay PDF or life affirmation, which involves an honest questioning of all doctrines that drain life s expansive energies, however socially prevalent those views might be Often referred to as one of the first existentialist philosophers along with S ren Kierkegaard , Nietzsche s revitalizing philosophy has inspired leading figures in all walks of cultural life, including dancers, poets, novelists, painters, psychologists, philosophers, sociologists and social revolutionariesFrom the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.


10 thoughts on “The Gay Science

  1. Zawn V Zawn V says:

    If you read Nietzsche while not in the midst of some variety of emo existential crisis, Nietzsche is hilarious and insightful If, however, you choose to read Nietzsche in high school in order to be counter culture, odds are good Nietzsche will temporarily turn you into a horrible, pompous ass Nietzsche is the first philosopher I ever read I stole The Gay Science from my cousin s book shelf when I was nine because I wanted to read what smart people read Ever since then, Nietzsche and I have If you read Nietzsche while not in the midst of some variety of emo existential crisis, Nietzsche is hilarious and insightful If, however, you choose to read Nietzsche in high school in order to be counter culture, odds are good Nietzsche will temporarily turn you into a horrible, pompous ass Nietzsche is the first philosopher I ever read I stole The Gay Science from my cousin s book shelf when I was nine because I wanted to read what smart people read Ever since then, Nietzsche and I have had a love affair the problem is that I cannot stand his fans I imagine this review will not be useful to most people, but if you ve encountered the Nietzsche bots, you know exactly what I am talking about

  2. Ahmad Sharabiani Ahmad Sharabiani says:

    Die fr hliche Wissenschaft The Gay Science, Friedrich NietzscheThe Gay Science or The Joyful Wisdom is a book by Friedrich Nietzsche, first published in 1882 and followed by a second edition, which was published after the completion of Thus Spoke Zarathustra and Beyond Good and Evil, in 1887 This substantial expansion includes a fifth book and an appendix of songs It was noted by Nietzsche to be the most personal of all his books , and contains the greatest number of poems in any of his p Die fr hliche Wissenschaft The Gay Science, Friedrich NietzscheThe Gay Science or The Joyful Wisdom is a book by Friedrich Nietzsche, first published in 1882 and followed by a second edition, which was published after the completion of Thus Spoke Zarathustra and Beyond Good and Evil, in 1887 This substantial expansion includes a fifth book and an appendix of songs It was noted by Nietzsche to be the most personal of all his books , and contains the greatest number of poems in any of his published works 2006 1377 9645620414 1380 1385 1388 978964620414 1389 1392 191882

  3. Roy Lotz Roy Lotz says:

    Themistrust, thephilosophy. How to review Nietzsche His writing is so rich, so overabundant, so overflowing, that evaluating his works is like trying to drink up a waterfall I cannot even decide whether Nietzsche was a philosopher, or something else Perhaps he can be better described as an essayist, a poet, a sage, a neurotic, a raving madman, a prescient visionary The title hardly matters, I suppose although without some benchmark of comparison, I am left in the dark for a w Themistrust, thephilosophy. How to review Nietzsche His writing is so rich, so overabundant, so overflowing, that evaluating his works is like trying to drink up a waterfall I cannot even decide whether Nietzsche was a philosopher, or something else Perhaps he can be better described as an essayist, a poet, a sage, a neurotic, a raving madman, a prescient visionary The title hardly matters, I suppose although without some benchmark of comparison, I am left in the dark for a way to measure Nietzsche and his writings The only way open I can see is to weigh Nietzsche against himself In the context of his full corpus, The Gay Science is easily one of Nietzsche s strongest works It dates from his middle period, after his break with Wagner and his renunciation of Schopenhauer, when he was still developing his most characteristic ideas Indeed, in this book one finds Nietzsche s first proclamation that God is dead, as well as the first mention of the Eternal Recurrence Many of Nietzsche s criticisms of science, humanism, liberalism, and above all morality can be found in nascent form in these pages, to befully developed in Beyond Good and Evil and The Genealogy of Morals Nietzsche s central project, put briefly, was to set about questioning the fundamental values and assumptions of Western history Many of these he traces back to Socrates, whom Nietzsche regards with a mix of admiration and horror In the works of Plato, Socrates is turned into an ideal he is coldly logical, scorning all sensations and emotions he holds that our everyday world is less worthy than the world beyond that art is not a source of knowledge or wisdom, but a mere beguilement of the senses that contemplation is better than action that peacefulness is better than passion that moral behavior leads to happiness This collection of doctrines, Nietzsche believes, was transformed into Christianity, which added what Nietzsche later referred to as a slave morality the praise of meekness, pity, kindness, gentleness, compassion, common in Christian preaching Nietzsche struggled for years to extricate himself from this morass, and in the process developed one of his faculties to the utmost perfection his suspicion Nietzsche suspected every received idea, automatic impulse, longstanding tradition, comforting thought, pleasant assumption, common opinion In this way, he hoped to disentangle himself from the spider s web and to see the world with a new clarity of vision If one would like to see our European morality for once as it looks for a distance, and if one would like to measure it against other moralities, past and future, then one has to proceed like a wanderer who wants to know how high the towers in the town are he leaves the town But it is no easy thing to leave one s entire society and culture behind, and to see it from a distance Perhaps it can t be done Nietzsche tried, first, by isolating himself physically, leading a solitary life away from friends and family, living off his pension from his time in the University of Basel From this vantage point, Nietzsche started to take aim at Western culture, as he perceived it This project was obviously not one of system building at least, not at first but of assault Nietzsche aimed to think outside of any system, to dance constantly on shifting ground, taking no assumption as a starting point, mistrustful of all impulses towards conventional opinion This, I think, is why Nietzsche wrote in aphorisms he needed to retreat quickly from his forays, so as not to get drawn back into the assumptions he was trying to criticize For I approach deep problems like cold baths quickly into them, and quickly out again Nietzsche felt that this job was not only important, but of historical significance This is because of his famous proclamation that God is dead or, in other words, that the idea of God was no longer taken seriously Nietzsche meant this not only intellectually, but also aesthetically What is not decisive against Christianity is our taste, no longer our reasons In other words, the old worldview was not only intellectually bankrupt, but not even pleasing any But the death of God was not an isolated event it marked a decisive transition in culture So many of our basic assumptions, about truth, morality, justice, and life, are based on the Christian worldview Without the support of this worldview, people would begin to see these assumptions as mere prejudices Indeed, our dependence on Christian assumptions is one of the things that Nietzsche most delighted in pointing out For example, the idea that truth isvaluable than appearance is a prejudice that originates in the old belief that all truth came from God The modern idea that every person is equal and deserves the same rights comes from the idea that everyone is equal in the eyes of God As is well known, Nietzsche eventually called himself Anti Christ, but his opposition to Christianity had nothing in common with Richard Dawkin s or Bertrand Russell s, who both opposed Christianity because it didn t hold up under logical scrutiny Rather, Nietzsche found Christianity distasteful because he perceived it as being life denying Christianity is a religion that considers humankind inherently sinful, and all bodily pleasures disgraceful a religion that decries this earthly life ugly and miserable, and places its hopes in the afterlife a religion that celebrates the virtues of weakness compassion for the sick, gentleness to your fellows, meekness in the face of an almighty God All of this, Nietzsche considers to be anti life a sick yearning for death For Nietzsche, Christianity was an attempt by people with weak bodies and unhealthy minds to impose their ailment on the rest of humanity a system created by feeble and miserable people to drag the rest of humanity down to their level Against this, Nietzsche proclaims a life affirming philosophy What this exactly entails is hard to say, but the fundamental doctrine is amor fati, or love of fate For Nietzsche, the ideal was to love your life so fully that you could wish to relive it over and over again, endlessly repeating the same actions This is the famous Eternal Recurrence.Personally, I find it all but impossible to discuss Nietzsche s ideas without discussing his life and his personality First, it is worth noting that Nietzsche was a sickly person, suffering from an acutely painful disease syphilis for his whole adult life Thus the question of philosophy being anti life or life affirming was a personal one for Nietzsche he wanted to rise above his own pain, to resist the urge to denigrate life because of his own suffering, and instead to cultivate a joyful wisdom Thus his philosophy was deeply personal, and we get a large dose of his personality in his writings Nietzsche was obviously a profoundly introverted man indeed, he was so introverted that he often mistook himself for the universe He was constitutionally incapable of being a good scholar he could not for a moment put his own prejudices aside and attempt neutrality Instead, Nietzsche treats the world as a kind of backdrop to his thoughts, payingattention to his opinions about things than to the things themselves He has such startling and original opinions that, most often, this is an exhilarating experience but this also leads Nietzsche into many statements that are obviously absurd and empirically false What is , Nietzsche s profound introversion eventually, and perhaps inevitably, turned into a profound narcissism that blackens his later writings As I said above, Nietzsche s strongest and most versatile weapon was his suspicion Most often, his deep mistrust allowed him to reach striking conclusions But occasionally his suspicion veers into cynicism, and cynicism is not an attractive quality The combination of this cynicism and his narcissism sometimes led Nietzsche into stupidity, such as his many idiotic comments about women These qualities also led Nietzsche to many positions that I, and most others nowadays, consider reactionary in the extreme and elitist beyond measure He is full of insults for the herd of humanity, the rabble, the stupid masses And his criticisms of conventional morality sometimes led Nietzsche to vicious conclusions Who will attain anything great if he does not find in himself the strength and the will to inflict great sufferingBeing able to suffer is the least thing weak women and even slaves often achieve virtuosity in that But not to perish of internal distress and uncertainty when one inflicts great suffering and hears the cry of this suffering that is great, that belongs to greatness.But as unattractive as Nietzsche s personality can be, and as unpalatable as some of his conclusions were, I still love his books Simply as a writer of prose, Nietzsche is in the first class his prose is fire made articulate More than that, his books are so full of ideas, so rich, so overabundant, so overflowing his mind was so nimble, his personality so strange, his conclusions so original, that you cannot help but come away with your brain buzzing with inspiration

  4. David David says:

    NOT GAY ENOUGH.

  5. Jonfaith Jonfaith says:

    For believe me the secret for harvesting from existence the greatest fruitfulness and the greatest enjoyment is to live dangerously Build your cities on the slopes of Vesuvius Send your ships into uncharted seas Live at war with your peers and yourselves Be robbers and conquerors as long as you cannot be rulers and possessors, you seekers of knowledge Soon the age will be past when you could be content to live hidden in forests like shy deer While this wasn t my point of departure into For believe me the secret for harvesting from existence the greatest fruitfulness and the greatest enjoyment is to live dangerously Build your cities on the slopes of Vesuvius Send your ships into uncharted seas Live at war with your peers and yourselves Be robbers and conquerors as long as you cannot be rulers and possessors, you seekers of knowledge Soon the age will be past when you could be content to live hidden in forests like shy deer While this wasn t my point of departure into Theory, though it should ve been Ideas bubbled and grew fecund in my youthful soul Pints of Carlsburg and shit food from Hardees nourshed my wretched body, but it was Nietzsche s frisson which propelled me forward

  6. Martin Martin says:

    What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you in your loneliest loneliness and say to you This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live onceand innumerable timesand there will be nothing new in it, but every pain and every joy and every thought and sigh and everything unutterably small or great in your life will have to return to you, all in the same succession and sequence even this spider and this moonlight between the trees, and even this m What, if some day or night a demon were to steal after you in your loneliest loneliness and say to you This life as you now live it and have lived it, you will have to live onceand innumerable timesand there will be nothing new in it, but every pain and every joy and every thought and sigh and everything unutterably small or great in your life will have to return to you, all in the same succession and sequence even this spider and this moonlight between the trees, and even this moment and I myself The eternal hourglass of existence is turned upside down again and again and you with it, speck of dust Would you not throw yourself down and gnash your teeth and curse the demon who spoke thus Or have you once experienced a tremendous moment when you would have answered him You are a god and never have I heard anythingdivine If this thought gained possession of you, it would change you as you are or perhaps crush you the question in each and every thing, Do you desire this once , and innumerable timeswould lie upon your actions as the greatest weight Or how well disposed would you have to become to yourself and to life to crave nothingfervently than this ultimate eternal confirmation and seal Nietzche is a genius

  7. Prickle Prickle says:

    Perhaps one of the greatest passages I encountered here has the unconventional form of a short parable, or psychologist s tale that almost doesin two paragraphs than an entire novella, and reminds me much of Johann Peter HebelIn dealings with people who are ashamed of their feelings, one must be able to disguise one s own for such people take a sudden antipathy to anyone who catches them in a moment of tenderness, or enthusiasm, or intemperate rage, as if their deepest secrets had bee Perhaps one of the greatest passages I encountered here has the unconventional form of a short parable, or psychologist s tale that almost doesin two paragraphs than an entire novella, and reminds me much of Johann Peter HebelIn dealings with people who are ashamed of their feelings, one must be able to disguise one s own for such people take a sudden antipathy to anyone who catches them in a moment of tenderness, or enthusiasm, or intemperate rage, as if their deepest secrets had been discovered If one wants to do them a kindness in such moments one should make them laugh, and utter some cold, cruel witticism then their heart turns to ice, and they regain self possession But I am giving you the moral before the story.There was a time in our lives when we had grown so close to one another in friendship and brotherhood that nothing seemed to stand between us except this little footbridge Just as you were about to step upon it, I asked you Do you want to cross this bridge to me But then you no longer wanted to, and when I asked you again, you fell silent Since then mountains and torrents and all that divides and estranges have come between us, and even if we wanted to be reconciled with one another, it was no longer possible However, when you think back to that little footbridge, you are at a loss for words but filled with tears and wonder Much of Nietzsche s aphorisms or rather passages that implicitly make up a whole here take on a poetic form that are rhythmic and conversational without completely jumping the ship of non fiction like Thus Spoke Zarathustra, and in this style The Joyous Science appear wholly unique and vivifying to a modern weary and logical mind in what is otherwise an ocean of grays and blues in writing Take it from the author himself, howeverIt is noteworthy that the great masters of prose have almost always been poets, either openly, or secretly for their own private enjoyment and truly, good prose is written only in light of poetry For prose is the result of an uninterrupted, polite war with poetry all its charm consists in the fact that poetry is constantly avoided and contradicted every abstraction wishes to be presented as a piece of roguishness against poetry and with mocking voice all dryness and coolness is supposed to drive the lovely goddess to lovely despair often there are momentary compromises and reconciliations between the two, and then a sudden rebound into laughter often the curtain is drawn back and harsh light let in just when the goddess was enjoying her twilights and dull colours often her words are taken from her mouth and sung to a melody which makes her hold her delicate hands over her delicate ears and so there are a thousand pleasures to this war, the defeats very much included, of which the unpoetic, the so called prose writers, know nothing which is why they write and speak only bad prose Now that I have been so soundly trounced, and seeing that against my better judgement I have unwittingly mentioned Hebel above without sparing him a single thought for almost exactly a year until now, I wonder if I might better occupy my time Walter Benjamin like with constructing my reviews solely out of quotations from now on

  8. Summer Summer says:

    Epic Nietzsche My favorite Nietzsche text and Nietzsche is my most favorite thinking creature of all time, so this means a lot somehow managing to be provocative, meditative, accessible, and entertaining in one stroke One of those rare books that you can actually pick up, flip to any page, and read, without wondering all that much about what came before I utilized many ideas presented in this book as jumping off points in my master s thesis, and were it not for the constrictions of time, Epic Nietzsche My favorite Nietzsche text and Nietzsche is my most favorite thinking creature of all time, so this means a lot somehow managing to be provocative, meditative, accessible, and entertaining in one stroke One of those rare books that you can actually pick up, flip to any page, and read, without wondering all that much about what came before I utilized many ideas presented in this book as jumping off points in my master s thesis, and were it not for the constrictions of time, space, and let s face it my will, I happily would have drawn on itI ve read it so many times that my copy is torn, taped, and in a general state of overused disarray, a testimony to its lasting effect on me The Gay Science has taken me on seriously remote journeys aboard my own train of thought , wherein I have found myself fantasizing about my dormant inner ubermensch in all of its crazed dancing and laughing glory Always a good time Especially for an aphorism junky

  9. Jack Jack says:

    384.Having finished the book, the reader had no choice but to read himself It was not a heroic story, nor a moral one indeed, he scarcely understood the author s intent in various chapters Its ending was implicit, if unwritten, yet the reader did not wish to imagine exactly what it would be Oftentimes it was tedious, not worth reading, and he continued partially from spite, for he did not put a book down easily, and partially from a deeper sense he could not ascribe words to a vibrancy, so 384.Having finished the book, the reader had no choice but to read himself It was not a heroic story, nor a moral one indeed, he scarcely understood the author s intent in various chapters Its ending was implicit, if unwritten, yet the reader did not wish to imagine exactly what it would be Oftentimes it was tedious, not worth reading, and he continued partially from spite, for he did not put a book down easily, and partially from a deeper sense he could not ascribe words to a vibrancy, something musical that would arrive and depart from his consciousness at the behest of an obscure whim And it made him laugh, suddenly and gaily and with honesty, as he sat alone in his room

  10. Karl Hallbjörnsson Karl Hallbjörnsson says:

    Best Nietzsche I ve read so far Kaufmann s annotation is extremely informative, insightful and at times quite hilarious Onwards to Zarathustra, then Edit been reading it again this year I m convinced that this is N s singular best work A real masterpiece.

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