As I Please: 1943-1945 MOBI ✓ As I eBook â

As I Please: 1943-1945 MOBI ✓ As I eBook â


10 thoughts on “As I Please: 1943-1945

  1. David David says:

    Orwell continues to astonish me with a his extraordinary what s the word I m looking for prolific doesn t seem to have an associated noun Fecundity Industry productivity oh, what the heck just the sheer volume of his output b the quality of his writing, which is clear and devoid of affectation throughout c the breadth of his scope is there anything he doesn t write about d the acuity of his intellect e the depth of his commitment to his political views, which are obvious Orwell continues to astonish me with a his extraordinary what s the word I m looking for prolific doesn t seem to have an associated noun Fecundity Industry productivity oh, what the heck just the sheer volume of his output b the quality of his writing, which is clear and devoid of affectation throughout c the breadth of his scope is there anything he doesn t write about d the acuity of his intellect e the depth of his commitment to his political views, which are obviously deeply felt, and which he defends passionately and articulately f the sanity that pervades all of the pieces in this book, all written at a time when Europe was plunged in chaos, and jingoistic propaganda was the order of the day It s fascinating to read Orwell s speculation about the likely political structures in postwar Europe, written when Hitler s defeat was by no means a given.I will try to write acomprehensive review once I finish the next, and final, volume in the series.But it should be obvious by now This is great stuff


  2. brian brian says:

    if i had to pick writer of the twentieth century it d be orwell no doubt his masterpiece, 1984, along with conrad s Secret Agent, tells one all she need know about life in contemporary america his essays, perhaps eventhan his fiction, are indispensable all four volumes should be bought, savored, and read over and over and over.


  3. Matthew Matthew says:

    One of the entertaining things about offering reviews of Orwell s essays is that I find myself increasingly applying his own method of critique to what he himself says This is actually a compliment, since it suggests that my own style of reviewing has become influenced by Orwell s style of reviewing books.This style is one of looking at the political and social significance of the books, and the views that the authors express, and Orwell uses this method throughout his reviews In this volume, One of the entertaining things about offering reviews of Orwell s essays is that I find myself increasingly applying his own method of critique to what he himself says This is actually a compliment, since it suggests that my own style of reviewing has become influenced by Orwell s style of reviewing books.This style is one of looking at the political and social significance of the books, and the views that the authors express, and Orwell uses this method throughout his reviews In this volume, Orwell offers his judgements on a variety of writers, including Joseph Conrad, Arthur Koestler, P.G Wodehouse and E.W Hornung, James Hadley Chase and Oliver Goldsmith Naturally, Orwell always finds time to allude to other favourites of his, including Joyce, Dickens and Smollett He even takes the time to write about Salvador Dali s autobiography One of the most praiseworthy aspects of Orwell s reviews is that he is able to separate his own political or moral opinions from making judgements about the aesthetics of a writer or in Dali s case artist In an age where people dismissed works they personally disapproved of as bad art, Orwell has anuanced approach, and he can recognise that it is still possible for something to be objectionable in its opinions, and yet still be good art.One great pity is that Orwell is rather dismissive and uninterested in cinema, the great new art form that was producing many good works at the time Perhaps one problem is that Orwell did not live in an age of television, let alone DVDs and videos, and so could not sit down and give those works the level of study that they deserve This leads to a number of what ifs in my mind It would have been interesting to see what Orwell would have made of a film like The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, which both defends and critiques a class of people that Orwell often mentions slightingly.Orwell s political views are similarly nuanced Unlike many left wing people of his age, he is able to be patriotic about his country, though not nationalistic he writes about this contrast in one essay here Similarly he continues to criticise Soviet communism at a time when the left wing intelligentsia were frequently blinded to what was going on in Russia.In fact, it s easy to forget that Orwell struggled to get Animal Farm published during the period of these writings 1943 1945 , because it was actually unpopular to post a book that attacked the Russian Revolution Orwell makes occasional allusions to this in his letters in this volume.This opposition came from both the right for whom Russia was a wartime ally and the left who were still reluctant to see anything bad in Russia Orwell was writing Animal Farm in the brief time between two periods of anti Communist feeling After the war, the right reverted to its usual anti Communist stance as the Cold War began The disillusionment of the left was to take longer, and perhaps only really took off when Kruschchev began to expose Stalinism for what it was However, the evidence was there for everyone to see, as Orwell s writings make clear.Indeed, if I am to give this volume a title of my own as I did with the first two volumes , I would be tempted to call it George Orwell Eats His Words, though I am aware that Orwell s hatred of clich s would not make this a popular choice with him.At various points in his writings in this volume, Orwell publicly admits that most of his predictions about the war were wrong, and he attributes it to wishful thinking on his part He at least acknowledges his mistaken judgments, and promises to do better in future though actually he continues to misjudge the situation, e.g the likelihood of a Labour victory in 1945.Orwell makes the perceptive point that people with a political agenda will never confess to being wrong, and that they will somehow find a subtle way of saying that their predictions were right after all He at least does not do that, though it is fair to say that his errors on the matter mean that we should be wary about accepting all his judgments and analyses.A large part of this volume is given over to Orwell s articles for Tribune, called As I Please Curiously, his style as a newspaper columnist is broadly similar to what we see in newspapers today a little bit of political or literary analysis, accompanied by something trivial It is surprising to find that newspaper journalism has changed so little in some respects.By this time in his career, Orwell is relaxed in his writing style, and can discuss issues very confidently He is not even above writing with great enthusiasm about rather mundane subjects such as cooking or tea As ever, this is suffused with a subtle patriotism, as in his account of the ideal English pub The Moon Under Water , English cooking, how to make a cup of tea, and the English language, a concern of his that recurs in a few of the writings in this volume.It may be my imagination, but the tone of Orwell s writing islight hearted here than I have seen in earlier volumes He may feel some worry with the political scene, but overall the tone is not one of pessimism or despondency, not even when his wife dies during this time.Overall, this is another accessible volume of George Orwell s non fiction His writings may be sweeping, dismissive, faintly rude and occasionally mundane, but there is always much to interest the reader Orwell had a voice of his own a no nonsense and passionate one and this comes across strongly in his writings during this period


  4. Mitchell Mitchell says:

    The third volume in Orwell s collected non fiction, As I Please covers the period from 1943 to 1945 At this time Orwell was working as literary editor at a magazine called Tribune, and wrote a regular column called As I Please in which he wrote, naturally, about whatever he pleased This volume takes not only its title but the bulk of its material from that column, and as a result, it s probably the best in the compendium so far While the previous volume was heavily political, Orwell s regul The third volume in Orwell s collected non fiction, As I Please covers the period from 1943 to 1945 At this time Orwell was working as literary editor at a magazine called Tribune, and wrote a regular column called As I Please in which he wrote, naturally, about whatever he pleased This volume takes not only its title but the bulk of its material from that column, and as a result, it s probably the best in the compendium so far While the previous volume was heavily political, Orwell s regular editorial columns wander over all sorts of subjects and never go for longer than a few pages Orwell discusses the progress of the war, political feeling of all kinds in England, anti American sentiment amongst the British, the use of language in newspapers, Burma, the drinking of tea, nationalism, and all kinds of things One of my favourite essays occurs near the beginning, in which Orwell describes his favourite pub, The Moon Under Water, only to reveal that it is wholly fictional, checking the ten aspects he thinks the ideal pub should have A restaurant in Melbourne has named itself after the essay, and its decor cheerfully violates the modern miseries Orwell was against I mentioned in my last review that I was keeping an eye out for the first mention of the Holocaust, but I m still unsure whether I ve found it Orwell mentions that beastly things were going on in the German concentration camps, but it s unclear whether the scope of the crimes were well known to the rest of the world indeed, Orwell mentions it in an essay describing how, because most people didn t want to hear about it, the knowledge slid off them It s important to bear in mind throughout this compendium that Orwell was writing for his own time, not for history, and takes for granted the reader s pre existing knowledge For example, I imagine Hiroshima would have been a day that shocked the world, but Orwell mentions it only in passing, in letters and essays on other topics, written weeks or months after it happened Overall, this volume was good stuff as usual It s a shame Orwell didn t keep a diary during the latter part of the war, since that was one of the most enjoyable parts of the last volume, but I suppose that s up to him


  5. Jarvis Cutter Jarvis Cutter says:

    This whole collection 4 volumes, spanning 1920 1950 sheds just as much light on our current world as it does on the one in which it was written One can t help but draw parallels between the conflicts Orwell describes among the Left of his time and the Left of ours e.g the irritating squabbles that have led to classifications like Bernie Bros, and Feinstein s recent showdown with a group of elementary school students It s worth noting, too, that Orwell s criticisms of Soviet style socia This whole collection 4 volumes, spanning 1920 1950 sheds just as much light on our current world as it does on the one in which it was written One can t help but draw parallels between the conflicts Orwell describes among the Left of his time and the Left of ours e.g the irritating squabbles that have led to classifications like Bernie Bros, and Feinstein s recent showdown with a group of elementary school students It s worth noting, too, that Orwell s criticisms of Soviet style socialism remain just as valid in the 21st century He points out again and again that what happened in the USSR wasn t socialism, which is something that right wing critics and contemporary American socialists can t wrap their heads around I was surprised to learn that during the German bombing campaigns in England during 1940 41, many British continued living their lives as if nothing at all were happening around them, much like Americans currently do in our state of national emergency He kept a detailed diary of the most dire parts of the war What strikes me most about these volumes is Orwell s commitment to truth, his vigorous analysis of language and propaganda, and his writing style He understood that average people could care less about strict adherence to ideology of any type, he wrote in language that is just as clear now as it was then, and he despised posturing and twisting events and history for political expediency I can t help but wonder what he d think of the deluge of fabrication and untruth we re forced to endure on the daily


  6. blakeR blakeR says:

    I believe I ve stated elsewhere that I would read Orwell write about paint drying After this I think I d have to recant that sentiment, as a lot of these reviews and As I Please columns seemed rather trivial, especially given the era in which they were written I still love the man, the thinker and the writer, but I was disappointed by how little he addressed incredibly significant historical moments such as D Day, Hiroshima Nagasaki and the end of the war I can t imagine he wouldn t have fa I believe I ve stated elsewhere that I would read Orwell write about paint drying After this I think I d have to recant that sentiment, as a lot of these reviews and As I Please columns seemed rather trivial, especially given the era in which they were written I still love the man, the thinker and the writer, but I was disappointed by how little he addressed incredibly significant historical moments such as D Day, Hiroshima Nagasaki and the end of the war I can t imagine he wouldn t have fascinating thoughts on the topics, and I was eagerly anticipating reading about them To be fair, a significant part of this disappointment is certainly due to reading Noam Chomsky before this, a guy who only writes about important things.Still, saying an Orwell book is disappointing, for me, is like saying that not all of Beethoven s symphonies were masterpieces That s just how much I unabashedly love the guy You still have the pristine clarity of thought, the overwhelming emphasis on reason and objectivity, and even the occasional humility for instance, when he had to admit that all of his wildly utopian predictions at the beginning of the war about England undergoing a revolution were embarrassing even to him something I pointed out in my review of the last volume He still offers fascinating insight into the ground level politics of WWII, what with its battling factions and ideologies.The overarching theme of these pieces is Orwell s humanism and democratic socialism, which he takes pains to defend against conservatism, totalitarianism, communism i.e., Stalinism , fascism and even Trotskyism dogmatic anti Stalin socialism It leaves me wanting to check out the final installment of the series, In Front of Your Nose 1945 1950 All that s left now is to note some highlights In the last analysis our only claim to victory is that if we win the war we shall tell less lies about it than our adversaries The really frightening thing about totalitarianism is not that it commits atrocities but that it attacks the concept of objective truth it claims to control the past as well as the future There is some hope, therefore, that the liberal habit of mind, which thinks of truth as something outside yourself, something to be discovered, and not as something you can make up as you go along, will survive 88That really shows the origin of a large portion of his 1984 ideas Then An argument that Socialists ought to be prepared to meet is the alleged immutability of human nature Socialists are accused I think without justification of assuming that Man is perfectible, and it is then pointed out that human history is in fact one long tale of greed, robbery and oppression.The proper answer, it seems to me, is that this argument belongs to the Stone Age It presupposes that material goods will always be desperately scarce The power hunger of human beings does indeed present a serious problem, but there is no reason for thinking that the greed for mere wealth is a permanent human characteristic We are selfish in economic matters because we all live in terror of poverty But when a commodity is not scarce, no one tries to grabthan his fair share of it No one tries to make a corner in air, for instance Or, again, water In this country we are not troubled by lack of water Yet in dried up countries like North Africa, what jealousies, what hatreds, what appalling crimes the lack of water can cause So also with any other kind of goods If they were made plentiful, as they so easily might be, there is no reason to think that the supposed acquisitive instincts of the human being could not be bred out in a couple of generations And after all, if human nature never changes, why is it that we not only don t practice cannibalism any longer, but don t even want to 189 90I am no lover of the V2 bomb , especially at this moment when the house still seems to be rocking from a recent explosion, but what depresses me about these things it the way they set people talking about the next war Every time one goes off I hear gloomy references to next time , and the reflection I suppose they ll be able to shoot them across the Atlantic by that time But if you ask who will be fighting whom when this universally expected war breaks out, you get no clear answer It is just war in the abstract the notion that human beings could ever behave sanely having apparently faded out of many people s memories 280Or again it can be argued that no unbiased outlook is possible, that all creeds and causes involve the same lies, follies and barbarities and this is often advanced as a reason for keeping out of politics altogether I do not accept this argument, if only because in the modern world no one describable as an intellectual can keep out of politics in the sense of not caring about them I think one must engage in politics using the word in a wide sense and that one must have preferences that is, one must recognize that some causes are objectively better than others, even if they are advanced by equally bad means As for the nationalistic loves and hatreds that I have spoken of, they are part of the make up of most of us, whether we like it or not Whether it is possible to get rid of them I do not know, but I do believe that it is possible to struggle against them, and that this is essentially a moral effort 380The great need of the moment is to make people aware of what is happening and why, and to persuade them that Socialism is a better way of life but not necessarily, in its first stages, acomfortable one I have no doubt they would accept this if it were put to them in the right way but at present nothing of the kind is being attempted 398Not Bad Reviews blakerosser1


  7. Godine Publisher & Black Sparrow Press Godine Publisher & Black Sparrow Press says:

    While Orwell is best known for Animal Farm and 1984, most of his writing derived from his tireless work as a journalist, and thanks to David Godine s welcome reissue of The Collected Essays, Journalism, and Letters of George Orwell, which has been out of print for a decade, readers can find it all in one place All of the author s insightful, hard hitting essays and journalistic pieces are here the most complete picture of the writer and man possible Eric Liebetrau Kirkus Reviews


  8. Sarah Gregory Sarah Gregory says:

    These pieces are brilliant Orwell s style is immaculate and carries you along His judgements are always interesting I particularly liked the piece on Dali where he picks apart the relationship between art and morality.


  9. Mary Catelli Mary Catelli says:

    I thinkessays and fewer letters than even the one before, covering up to the tail end of World War II it includes an allusion to the atom bomb, namely that the Japanese surrender did much to reconcile the British to it.More literary criticism and discussion of writing He objects to the notion of criticism that is actually disapproval of your opponents point of view in the abstract, he doesn t always avoid it with concrete lit crit His review of Hayek s Road to Serfdom is clearer t I thinkessays and fewer letters than even the one before, covering up to the tail end of World War II it includes an allusion to the atom bomb, namely that the Japanese surrender did much to reconcile the British to it.More literary criticism and discussion of writing He objects to the notion of criticism that is actually disapproval of your opponents point of view in the abstract, he doesn t always avoid it with concrete lit crit His review of Hayek s Road to Serfdom is clearer than most he admits that Hayek has a good view of the problems of controlled economies, but his belief in historical inevitable hampers him, and he s quite certain that economic competitions have winners and there your competition ends.It occurs to me that I should include a warning about Benefit of the Clergy , one of the essays It s about Dali, and it concludes with observations about saying that a work is a magnificent piece of artistry and should be burned by the public hangman It makes it very clear why he thinks of this of Dali, and it s rather revolting stuff.Some interesting little bits about English cookery, and the wonders of Woolworth s roses and how the cheap ones he got are still flourishing and bringing joy to passersby long after he left the place where he planted them.The war and the political developments as they appeared then At the end of the war, doing a letter for the Partisan Review that summed up his earlier letter he observed that he had often been wrong in his predictions, and that many people were when they did not want what was going to happen He does not go on to observe that the accurate ones were probably as much wishful thinking, too Discussion of the birthrate in a manner that shows how very differently the matter was viewed back then


  10. Ben Bush Ben Bush says:

    This is kind of a boring looking book letters and essays 1943 1945 When it showed up I wondered what I had been thinking and then every time I opened it I was shocked by just how interested in it I was Orwell is so alarmingly sharp and honest, but what is maybe most remarkable is what good company he is To me, much like David Foster Wallace, whenever I read Orwell I feel honored to be spending time with this person and that they are speaking to me so respectfully and companionably There s This is kind of a boring looking book letters and essays 1943 1945 When it showed up I wondered what I had been thinking and then every time I opened it I was shocked by just how interested in it I was Orwell is so alarmingly sharp and honest, but what is maybe most remarkable is what good company he is To me, much like David Foster Wallace, whenever I read Orwell I feel honored to be spending time with this person and that they are speaking to me so respectfully and companionably There s so much interesting stuff in here on anti semitism, nationalism, Orwell s unpopular anti Soviet opinions within his circle of Socialism Orwell s kind of contempt for Dali is pretty notable as well, which at first seemed like one of those long forgotten disputes like Stravinsky vs Schoenberg that now in retrospect seems a bit ridiculous but instead it made me think about how Orwell had gone to fight in the Spanish civil war and been shot in the throat, while Dali had thought of the role of the artist as above politics while living in the houses of wealthy aristocrats who were siding with Franco I was never that big of a fan of Orwell s novels but his non fiction is so alive If you haven t read one of his non fiction works I recommend them fully Any of his collections of essays or Homage to Catalonia seem like great places to start Orwell, you rule


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As I Please: 1943-1945 ❴EPUB❵ ✼ As I Please: 1943-1945 Author George Orwell – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk Featuring the column Orwell wrote for the Socialist weekly Tribune where he was the literary editor , As I Please also includes Orwell s spirited defense of English cooking, notes on the perfect cup o Featuring the column Orwell wrote for the Socialist weekly Tribune where he was the literary editor , As I Please also includes Orwell s spirited defense of English cooking, notes on As I eBook â the perfect cup of tea, and accounts of the difficulties with and ultimate success of Animal Farm From theedition.

  • Paperback
  • 435 pages
  • As I Please: 1943-1945
  • George Orwell
  • English
  • 21 December 2018
  • 1567921353

About the Author: George Orwell

Eric Arthur Blair, better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist His work is marked by keen intelligence and wit, a profound awareness of social As I eBook â injustice, an intense opposition to totalitarianism, a passion for clarity in language, and a belief in democratic socialismIn addition to his literary career Orwell served as a police officer with the Indian Imperial Police in Burma from and fought with the Republicans in the Spanish Civil War from Orwell was severely wounded when he was shot through his throat Later the organization that he had joined when he joined the Republican cause, The Workers Party of Marxist Unification POUM , was painted by the pro Soviet Communists as a Trotskyist organization Trotsky was Joseph Stalin s enemy and disbanded Orwell and his wife were accused of rabid Trotskyism and tried in absentia in Barcelona, along with other leaders of the POUM, in However by then they had escaped from Spain and returned to England Between and , Orwell worked on propaganda for the BBC In , he became literary editor of the Tribune, a weekly left wing magazine He was a prolific polemical journalist, article writer, literary critic, reviewer, poet, and writer of fiction, and, considered perhaps the twentieth century s best chronicler of English culture Orwell is best known for the dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty Four published in and the satirical novella Animal Farm they have together soldcopies than any two books by any other twentieth century author His book Homage to Catalonia, an account of his experiences as a volunteer on the Republican side during the Spanish Civil War, together with numerous essays on politics, literature, language, and culture, have been widely acclaimed Orwell s influence on contemporary culture, popular and political, continues decades after his death Several of his neologisms, along with the term Orwellian now a byword for any oppressive or manipulative social phenomenon opposed to a free society have entered the vernacular.


10 thoughts on “As I Please: 1943-1945

  1. David David says:

    Orwell continues to astonish me with a his extraordinary what s the word I m looking for prolific doesn t seem to have an associated noun Fecundity Industry productivity oh, what the heck just the sheer volume of his output b the quality of his writing, which is clear and devoid of affectation throughout c the breadth of his scope is there anything he doesn t write about d the acuity of his intellect e the depth of his commitment to his political views, which are obvious Orwell continues to astonish me with a his extraordinary what s the word I m looking for prolific doesn t seem to have an associated noun Fecundity Industry productivity oh, what the heck just the sheer volume of his output b the quality of his writing, which is clear and devoid of affectation throughout c the breadth of his scope is there anything he doesn t write about d the acuity of his intellect e the depth of his commitment to his political views, which are obviously deeply felt, and which he defends passionately and articulately f the sanity that pervades all of the pieces in this book, all written at a time when Europe was plunged in chaos, and jingoistic propaganda was the order of the day It s fascinating to read Orwell s speculation about the likely political structures in postwar Europe, written when Hitler s defeat was by no means a given.I will try to write acomprehensive review once I finish the next, and final, volume in the series.But it should be obvious by now This is great stuff

  2. brian brian says:

    if i had to pick writer of the twentieth century it d be orwell no doubt his masterpiece, 1984, along with conrad s Secret Agent, tells one all she need know about life in contemporary america his essays, perhaps eventhan his fiction, are indispensable all four volumes should be bought, savored, and read over and over and over.

  3. Matthew Matthew says:

    One of the entertaining things about offering reviews of Orwell s essays is that I find myself increasingly applying his own method of critique to what he himself says This is actually a compliment, since it suggests that my own style of reviewing has become influenced by Orwell s style of reviewing books.This style is one of looking at the political and social significance of the books, and the views that the authors express, and Orwell uses this method throughout his reviews In this volume, One of the entertaining things about offering reviews of Orwell s essays is that I find myself increasingly applying his own method of critique to what he himself says This is actually a compliment, since it suggests that my own style of reviewing has become influenced by Orwell s style of reviewing books.This style is one of looking at the political and social significance of the books, and the views that the authors express, and Orwell uses this method throughout his reviews In this volume, Orwell offers his judgements on a variety of writers, including Joseph Conrad, Arthur Koestler, P.G Wodehouse and E.W Hornung, James Hadley Chase and Oliver Goldsmith Naturally, Orwell always finds time to allude to other favourites of his, including Joyce, Dickens and Smollett He even takes the time to write about Salvador Dali s autobiography One of the most praiseworthy aspects of Orwell s reviews is that he is able to separate his own political or moral opinions from making judgements about the aesthetics of a writer or in Dali s case artist In an age where people dismissed works they personally disapproved of as bad art, Orwell has anuanced approach, and he can recognise that it is still possible for something to be objectionable in its opinions, and yet still be good art.One great pity is that Orwell is rather dismissive and uninterested in cinema, the great new art form that was producing many good works at the time Perhaps one problem is that Orwell did not live in an age of television, let alone DVDs and videos, and so could not sit down and give those works the level of study that they deserve This leads to a number of what ifs in my mind It would have been interesting to see what Orwell would have made of a film like The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, which both defends and critiques a class of people that Orwell often mentions slightingly.Orwell s political views are similarly nuanced Unlike many left wing people of his age, he is able to be patriotic about his country, though not nationalistic he writes about this contrast in one essay here Similarly he continues to criticise Soviet communism at a time when the left wing intelligentsia were frequently blinded to what was going on in Russia.In fact, it s easy to forget that Orwell struggled to get Animal Farm published during the period of these writings 1943 1945 , because it was actually unpopular to post a book that attacked the Russian Revolution Orwell makes occasional allusions to this in his letters in this volume.This opposition came from both the right for whom Russia was a wartime ally and the left who were still reluctant to see anything bad in Russia Orwell was writing Animal Farm in the brief time between two periods of anti Communist feeling After the war, the right reverted to its usual anti Communist stance as the Cold War began The disillusionment of the left was to take longer, and perhaps only really took off when Kruschchev began to expose Stalinism for what it was However, the evidence was there for everyone to see, as Orwell s writings make clear.Indeed, if I am to give this volume a title of my own as I did with the first two volumes , I would be tempted to call it George Orwell Eats His Words, though I am aware that Orwell s hatred of clich s would not make this a popular choice with him.At various points in his writings in this volume, Orwell publicly admits that most of his predictions about the war were wrong, and he attributes it to wishful thinking on his part He at least acknowledges his mistaken judgments, and promises to do better in future though actually he continues to misjudge the situation, e.g the likelihood of a Labour victory in 1945.Orwell makes the perceptive point that people with a political agenda will never confess to being wrong, and that they will somehow find a subtle way of saying that their predictions were right after all He at least does not do that, though it is fair to say that his errors on the matter mean that we should be wary about accepting all his judgments and analyses.A large part of this volume is given over to Orwell s articles for Tribune, called As I Please Curiously, his style as a newspaper columnist is broadly similar to what we see in newspapers today a little bit of political or literary analysis, accompanied by something trivial It is surprising to find that newspaper journalism has changed so little in some respects.By this time in his career, Orwell is relaxed in his writing style, and can discuss issues very confidently He is not even above writing with great enthusiasm about rather mundane subjects such as cooking or tea As ever, this is suffused with a subtle patriotism, as in his account of the ideal English pub The Moon Under Water , English cooking, how to make a cup of tea, and the English language, a concern of his that recurs in a few of the writings in this volume.It may be my imagination, but the tone of Orwell s writing islight hearted here than I have seen in earlier volumes He may feel some worry with the political scene, but overall the tone is not one of pessimism or despondency, not even when his wife dies during this time.Overall, this is another accessible volume of George Orwell s non fiction His writings may be sweeping, dismissive, faintly rude and occasionally mundane, but there is always much to interest the reader Orwell had a voice of his own a no nonsense and passionate one and this comes across strongly in his writings during this period

  4. Mitchell Mitchell says:

    The third volume in Orwell s collected non fiction, As I Please covers the period from 1943 to 1945 At this time Orwell was working as literary editor at a magazine called Tribune, and wrote a regular column called As I Please in which he wrote, naturally, about whatever he pleased This volume takes not only its title but the bulk of its material from that column, and as a result, it s probably the best in the compendium so far While the previous volume was heavily political, Orwell s regul The third volume in Orwell s collected non fiction, As I Please covers the period from 1943 to 1945 At this time Orwell was working as literary editor at a magazine called Tribune, and wrote a regular column called As I Please in which he wrote, naturally, about whatever he pleased This volume takes not only its title but the bulk of its material from that column, and as a result, it s probably the best in the compendium so far While the previous volume was heavily political, Orwell s regular editorial columns wander over all sorts of subjects and never go for longer than a few pages Orwell discusses the progress of the war, political feeling of all kinds in England, anti American sentiment amongst the British, the use of language in newspapers, Burma, the drinking of tea, nationalism, and all kinds of things One of my favourite essays occurs near the beginning, in which Orwell describes his favourite pub, The Moon Under Water, only to reveal that it is wholly fictional, checking the ten aspects he thinks the ideal pub should have A restaurant in Melbourne has named itself after the essay, and its decor cheerfully violates the modern miseries Orwell was against I mentioned in my last review that I was keeping an eye out for the first mention of the Holocaust, but I m still unsure whether I ve found it Orwell mentions that beastly things were going on in the German concentration camps, but it s unclear whether the scope of the crimes were well known to the rest of the world indeed, Orwell mentions it in an essay describing how, because most people didn t want to hear about it, the knowledge slid off them It s important to bear in mind throughout this compendium that Orwell was writing for his own time, not for history, and takes for granted the reader s pre existing knowledge For example, I imagine Hiroshima would have been a day that shocked the world, but Orwell mentions it only in passing, in letters and essays on other topics, written weeks or months after it happened Overall, this volume was good stuff as usual It s a shame Orwell didn t keep a diary during the latter part of the war, since that was one of the most enjoyable parts of the last volume, but I suppose that s up to him

  5. Jarvis Cutter Jarvis Cutter says:

    This whole collection 4 volumes, spanning 1920 1950 sheds just as much light on our current world as it does on the one in which it was written One can t help but draw parallels between the conflicts Orwell describes among the Left of his time and the Left of ours e.g the irritating squabbles that have led to classifications like Bernie Bros, and Feinstein s recent showdown with a group of elementary school students It s worth noting, too, that Orwell s criticisms of Soviet style socia This whole collection 4 volumes, spanning 1920 1950 sheds just as much light on our current world as it does on the one in which it was written One can t help but draw parallels between the conflicts Orwell describes among the Left of his time and the Left of ours e.g the irritating squabbles that have led to classifications like Bernie Bros, and Feinstein s recent showdown with a group of elementary school students It s worth noting, too, that Orwell s criticisms of Soviet style socialism remain just as valid in the 21st century He points out again and again that what happened in the USSR wasn t socialism, which is something that right wing critics and contemporary American socialists can t wrap their heads around I was surprised to learn that during the German bombing campaigns in England during 1940 41, many British continued living their lives as if nothing at all were happening around them, much like Americans currently do in our state of national emergency He kept a detailed diary of the most dire parts of the war What strikes me most about these volumes is Orwell s commitment to truth, his vigorous analysis of language and propaganda, and his writing style He understood that average people could care less about strict adherence to ideology of any type, he wrote in language that is just as clear now as it was then, and he despised posturing and twisting events and history for political expediency I can t help but wonder what he d think of the deluge of fabrication and untruth we re forced to endure on the daily

  6. blakeR blakeR says:

    I believe I ve stated elsewhere that I would read Orwell write about paint drying After this I think I d have to recant that sentiment, as a lot of these reviews and As I Please columns seemed rather trivial, especially given the era in which they were written I still love the man, the thinker and the writer, but I was disappointed by how little he addressed incredibly significant historical moments such as D Day, Hiroshima Nagasaki and the end of the war I can t imagine he wouldn t have fa I believe I ve stated elsewhere that I would read Orwell write about paint drying After this I think I d have to recant that sentiment, as a lot of these reviews and As I Please columns seemed rather trivial, especially given the era in which they were written I still love the man, the thinker and the writer, but I was disappointed by how little he addressed incredibly significant historical moments such as D Day, Hiroshima Nagasaki and the end of the war I can t imagine he wouldn t have fascinating thoughts on the topics, and I was eagerly anticipating reading about them To be fair, a significant part of this disappointment is certainly due to reading Noam Chomsky before this, a guy who only writes about important things.Still, saying an Orwell book is disappointing, for me, is like saying that not all of Beethoven s symphonies were masterpieces That s just how much I unabashedly love the guy You still have the pristine clarity of thought, the overwhelming emphasis on reason and objectivity, and even the occasional humility for instance, when he had to admit that all of his wildly utopian predictions at the beginning of the war about England undergoing a revolution were embarrassing even to him something I pointed out in my review of the last volume He still offers fascinating insight into the ground level politics of WWII, what with its battling factions and ideologies.The overarching theme of these pieces is Orwell s humanism and democratic socialism, which he takes pains to defend against conservatism, totalitarianism, communism i.e., Stalinism , fascism and even Trotskyism dogmatic anti Stalin socialism It leaves me wanting to check out the final installment of the series, In Front of Your Nose 1945 1950 All that s left now is to note some highlights In the last analysis our only claim to victory is that if we win the war we shall tell less lies about it than our adversaries The really frightening thing about totalitarianism is not that it commits atrocities but that it attacks the concept of objective truth it claims to control the past as well as the future There is some hope, therefore, that the liberal habit of mind, which thinks of truth as something outside yourself, something to be discovered, and not as something you can make up as you go along, will survive 88That really shows the origin of a large portion of his 1984 ideas Then An argument that Socialists ought to be prepared to meet is the alleged immutability of human nature Socialists are accused I think without justification of assuming that Man is perfectible, and it is then pointed out that human history is in fact one long tale of greed, robbery and oppression.The proper answer, it seems to me, is that this argument belongs to the Stone Age It presupposes that material goods will always be desperately scarce The power hunger of human beings does indeed present a serious problem, but there is no reason for thinking that the greed for mere wealth is a permanent human characteristic We are selfish in economic matters because we all live in terror of poverty But when a commodity is not scarce, no one tries to grabthan his fair share of it No one tries to make a corner in air, for instance Or, again, water In this country we are not troubled by lack of water Yet in dried up countries like North Africa, what jealousies, what hatreds, what appalling crimes the lack of water can cause So also with any other kind of goods If they were made plentiful, as they so easily might be, there is no reason to think that the supposed acquisitive instincts of the human being could not be bred out in a couple of generations And after all, if human nature never changes, why is it that we not only don t practice cannibalism any longer, but don t even want to 189 90I am no lover of the V2 bomb , especially at this moment when the house still seems to be rocking from a recent explosion, but what depresses me about these things it the way they set people talking about the next war Every time one goes off I hear gloomy references to next time , and the reflection I suppose they ll be able to shoot them across the Atlantic by that time But if you ask who will be fighting whom when this universally expected war breaks out, you get no clear answer It is just war in the abstract the notion that human beings could ever behave sanely having apparently faded out of many people s memories 280Or again it can be argued that no unbiased outlook is possible, that all creeds and causes involve the same lies, follies and barbarities and this is often advanced as a reason for keeping out of politics altogether I do not accept this argument, if only because in the modern world no one describable as an intellectual can keep out of politics in the sense of not caring about them I think one must engage in politics using the word in a wide sense and that one must have preferences that is, one must recognize that some causes are objectively better than others, even if they are advanced by equally bad means As for the nationalistic loves and hatreds that I have spoken of, they are part of the make up of most of us, whether we like it or not Whether it is possible to get rid of them I do not know, but I do believe that it is possible to struggle against them, and that this is essentially a moral effort 380The great need of the moment is to make people aware of what is happening and why, and to persuade them that Socialism is a better way of life but not necessarily, in its first stages, acomfortable one I have no doubt they would accept this if it were put to them in the right way but at present nothing of the kind is being attempted 398Not Bad Reviews blakerosser1

  7. Godine Publisher & Black Sparrow Press Godine Publisher & Black Sparrow Press says:

    While Orwell is best known for Animal Farm and 1984, most of his writing derived from his tireless work as a journalist, and thanks to David Godine s welcome reissue of The Collected Essays, Journalism, and Letters of George Orwell, which has been out of print for a decade, readers can find it all in one place All of the author s insightful, hard hitting essays and journalistic pieces are here the most complete picture of the writer and man possible Eric Liebetrau Kirkus Reviews

  8. Sarah Gregory Sarah Gregory says:

    These pieces are brilliant Orwell s style is immaculate and carries you along His judgements are always interesting I particularly liked the piece on Dali where he picks apart the relationship between art and morality.

  9. Mary Catelli Mary Catelli says:

    I thinkessays and fewer letters than even the one before, covering up to the tail end of World War II it includes an allusion to the atom bomb, namely that the Japanese surrender did much to reconcile the British to it.More literary criticism and discussion of writing He objects to the notion of criticism that is actually disapproval of your opponents point of view in the abstract, he doesn t always avoid it with concrete lit crit His review of Hayek s Road to Serfdom is clearer t I thinkessays and fewer letters than even the one before, covering up to the tail end of World War II it includes an allusion to the atom bomb, namely that the Japanese surrender did much to reconcile the British to it.More literary criticism and discussion of writing He objects to the notion of criticism that is actually disapproval of your opponents point of view in the abstract, he doesn t always avoid it with concrete lit crit His review of Hayek s Road to Serfdom is clearer than most he admits that Hayek has a good view of the problems of controlled economies, but his belief in historical inevitable hampers him, and he s quite certain that economic competitions have winners and there your competition ends.It occurs to me that I should include a warning about Benefit of the Clergy , one of the essays It s about Dali, and it concludes with observations about saying that a work is a magnificent piece of artistry and should be burned by the public hangman It makes it very clear why he thinks of this of Dali, and it s rather revolting stuff.Some interesting little bits about English cookery, and the wonders of Woolworth s roses and how the cheap ones he got are still flourishing and bringing joy to passersby long after he left the place where he planted them.The war and the political developments as they appeared then At the end of the war, doing a letter for the Partisan Review that summed up his earlier letter he observed that he had often been wrong in his predictions, and that many people were when they did not want what was going to happen He does not go on to observe that the accurate ones were probably as much wishful thinking, too Discussion of the birthrate in a manner that shows how very differently the matter was viewed back then

  10. Ben Bush Ben Bush says:

    This is kind of a boring looking book letters and essays 1943 1945 When it showed up I wondered what I had been thinking and then every time I opened it I was shocked by just how interested in it I was Orwell is so alarmingly sharp and honest, but what is maybe most remarkable is what good company he is To me, much like David Foster Wallace, whenever I read Orwell I feel honored to be spending time with this person and that they are speaking to me so respectfully and companionably There s This is kind of a boring looking book letters and essays 1943 1945 When it showed up I wondered what I had been thinking and then every time I opened it I was shocked by just how interested in it I was Orwell is so alarmingly sharp and honest, but what is maybe most remarkable is what good company he is To me, much like David Foster Wallace, whenever I read Orwell I feel honored to be spending time with this person and that they are speaking to me so respectfully and companionably There s so much interesting stuff in here on anti semitism, nationalism, Orwell s unpopular anti Soviet opinions within his circle of Socialism Orwell s kind of contempt for Dali is pretty notable as well, which at first seemed like one of those long forgotten disputes like Stravinsky vs Schoenberg that now in retrospect seems a bit ridiculous but instead it made me think about how Orwell had gone to fight in the Spanish civil war and been shot in the throat, while Dali had thought of the role of the artist as above politics while living in the houses of wealthy aristocrats who were siding with Franco I was never that big of a fan of Orwell s novels but his non fiction is so alive If you haven t read one of his non fiction works I recommend them fully Any of his collections of essays or Homage to Catalonia seem like great places to start Orwell, you rule

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