Paperback º Tutankhamen's Gift Kindle Þ

Paperback º Tutankhamen's Gift Kindle Þ

Tutankhamen's Gift [Epub] ❧ Tutankhamen's Gift Author Robert Sabuda – Capitalsoftworks.co.uk With astonishing artwork created from cut paper and inks on papyrus this simply written account of one of Egypt's most fabled kings follows Tutankhamen from his frail childhood through his brief but m With astonishing artwork created from cut paper and inks on papyrus this simply written account of one of Egypt's most fabled kings follows Tutankhamen from his frail childhood through his brief but magnificent reign A New York Times Notable Children's Book Full color.


10 thoughts on “Tutankhamen's Gift

  1. Calista Calista says:

    My niece begged to have this book read telling me she loves this book It is about Tutankhamen growing up seeing his father build Egypt and then after his death his older brother is not a good ruler Eventually it falls to him to bring back the glory of Egypt I thought it was a little dry and I enjoyed the art It was a good book My young nephew wasn't very into the story so I suppose age does matter with this one


  2. Tracyesine Tracyesine says:

    This book relies on a controversial theory about Tutankhamen's parentage which may eventually be proven accurate but which as the basis of a children's book with no comment about the standard interpretation of history feels disingenuous It's almost like writing a picture book about someone else being the real Shakespeare as some like to claim and making no note of the fact that most historians believe Shakespeare was just ShakespeareFor those who are wondering most historians consider Tutankhamen to be the son of Akhenaten aka Amenhotep IV not the son of Amenhotep III as this book claimsThe second star is because it is otherwise an enjoyable book


  3. Paul Paul says:

    Streamlined accounting of Tutankhamen’s life from childhood to leading and restoring the ancient kingdom As a young and overlooked boy he observed his father’s reign and building projects followed by his father’s death and he succession of his tyrannical brother The book’s pages glow with the background of Egyptian papyri on which Sabuda painted and overlaid black cut paper for outlines Brilliant


  4. Rachel Rachel says:

    Love the context and richness of the illustrations as they capture an Egyptian style Marked as nonfiction because that's how it's shelved in the library but really historical fiction in some ways


  5. Jessica Jessica says:

    I really enjoyed this book I am familiar with the history and liked the way Sabuda shared the information The illustrations are beautiful Love Sabuda’s work


  6. Desi Desi says:

    I really enjoyed the illustrations and it was a fine story


  7. Dana Dana says:

    Loved the bright illustrations on papyrus


  8. Ebookwormy1 Ebookwormy1 says:

    This is a beautifully illustrated and engagingly written historical fiction book for childrenWhat I liked The illustrations are amazing Amazing in a historically accurate give you a 'feel' for ancient egypt kind of way Little Tut's two cats appear in most pages and it is fun to find them The theme of the little overlooked boy assuming leadership was good I like the idea another reviewer had of using this book to teach students about historical fiction and having them identify what we know from documents and excavation and what we don't know based on fact This would be a great exercise for older elementary students For example we know Tut was small but we do not know if he was overlooked We know the older brother demanded worship of one god and was not liked by the people but we do not know what kind of relationship he had with either his father or his brother which the book presents as strained The story format communicates to even young students the tensions in ancient Egypt regarding transitions between pharaoh's and resistance to change of their religious practices giving them a feel for the history in narrative form I liked the note at the end that tried to clarify the historical pointsWhat I didn't like The religious message is confusing The little boy's father dies The older brother becomes pharaoh and tells all Egyptians to worship only one god This directive involves tearing down structures built by and monuments ofto the beloved father reasonable given the fact that the Egyptians believed the pharaoh was a god but very sad for a grieving little boy The people hate the older brother pharaoh King Tut's gift is that when the older brother dies he restores pantheistic worship in Egypt He agrees to assume leadership and proclaim himself pharaoh after having a voice on the wind speak to him As you can see there are a lot of ticklish subjects here for young elementary studentsAs you can see I have strong feelings for and against this work In the context of our homeschool I do think this book made a good contribution however if I were to buy only a few books about Egypt I don't think this one would be on my list


  9. Cris Cris says:

    Beautiful intro to art history BUT the history and the writing craft paint a confusing and incomplete picture Hmmm I'm still debating wether I want to use the book There's a tendency for people today to regard polytheism of old as a panacea of religious tolerance So the missing historical components of Sabuda's storytelling here could be understood to be confusing polytheism and religious tolerance by impressionable readers young and old He focuses solely on the religious differences between Tutankhamen and Amhotep and not at all on the few known facts of his statescraft Did Amenhotep institute the monotheism? Yes But he seems to have been a terrible ruler and that was also why he was hated I can deal with a little poetic license in exchange for a lot of pictures of good Egyptian art in a child friendly story; however I can't say I care for the ambiguous picture of Tutankhamen of restoring truth and beauty surrounded by disembodied entities ?? He may have been looking to illustrate some poetic words but he chose confusing images given the topic More distance has to be used by omniscient writers in children's stories to preserve a historical perspective I love Sabuda's love of art history but he seems to have consistently put out historically flawed books


  10. Danie Plott Danie Plott says:

    Tutankhamen’s Gift is a beautiful way to experience a little bit of Ancient Egyptian history The story reveals the life of Tutankhamen and his predecessors starting first with his respected father and then his tyrannical older brother This would be an excellent book for any child learning about ancient Egypt as Sabuda writes such a simple and enjoyable story that contains great facts and shows the culture of the time Sabuda creates two dimensional artwork that is just as stunning as his three dimensional pop up books He uses an authentic ancient Egyptian style painting on handmade papyrus paper and keeping true to his tedious craftsmanship he constructs his outlines from a single piece of black paper He uses bright colors simple figures and lots of negative space and intricate patterns to give the feeling that the illustrations were found on ancient Egyptian walls and scrolls


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10 thoughts on “Tutankhamen's Gift

  1. Calista Calista says:

    My niece begged to have this book read telling me she loves this book It is about Tutankhamen growing up seeing his father build Egypt and then after his death his older brother is not a good ruler Eventually it falls to him to bring back the glory of Egypt I thought it was a little dry and I enjoyed the art It was a good book My young nephew wasn't very into the story so I suppose age does matter with this one

  2. Tracyesine Tracyesine says:

    This book relies on a controversial theory about Tutankhamen's parentage which may eventually be proven accurate but which as the basis of a children's book with no comment about the standard interpretation of history feels disingenuous It's almost like writing a picture book about someone else being the real Shakespeare as some like to claim and making no note of the fact that most historians believe Shakespeare was just ShakespeareFor those who are wondering most historians consider Tutankhamen to be the son of Akhenaten aka Amenhotep IV not the son of Amenhotep III as this book claimsThe second star is because it is otherwise an enjoyable book

  3. Paul Paul says:

    Streamlined accounting of Tutankhamen’s life from childhood to leading and restoring the ancient kingdom As a young and overlooked boy he observed his father’s reign and building projects followed by his father’s death and he succession of his tyrannical brother The book’s pages glow with the background of Egyptian papyri on which Sabuda painted and overlaid black cut paper for outlines Brilliant

  4. Rachel Rachel says:

    Love the context and richness of the illustrations as they capture an Egyptian style Marked as nonfiction because that's how it's shelved in the library but really historical fiction in some ways

  5. Jessica Jessica says:

    I really enjoyed this book I am familiar with the history and liked the way Sabuda shared the information The illustrations are beautiful Love Sabuda’s work

  6. Desi Desi says:

    I really enjoyed the illustrations and it was a fine story

  7. Dana Dana says:

    Loved the bright illustrations on papyrus

  8. Ebookwormy1 Ebookwormy1 says:

    This is a beautifully illustrated and engagingly written historical fiction book for childrenWhat I liked The illustrations are amazing Amazing in a historically accurate give you a 'feel' for ancient egypt kind of way Little Tut's two cats appear in most pages and it is fun to find them The theme of the little overlooked boy assuming leadership was good I like the idea another reviewer had of using this book to teach students about historical fiction and having them identify what we know from documents and excavation and what we don't know based on fact This would be a great exercise for older elementary students For example we know Tut was small but we do not know if he was overlooked We know the older brother demanded worship of one god and was not liked by the people but we do not know what kind of relationship he had with either his father or his brother which the book presents as strained The story format communicates to even young students the tensions in ancient Egypt regarding transitions between pharaoh's and resistance to change of their religious practices giving them a feel for the history in narrative form I liked the note at the end that tried to clarify the historical pointsWhat I didn't like The religious message is confusing The little boy's father dies The older brother becomes pharaoh and tells all Egyptians to worship only one god This directive involves tearing down structures built by and monuments ofto the beloved father reasonable given the fact that the Egyptians believed the pharaoh was a god but very sad for a grieving little boy The people hate the older brother pharaoh King Tut's gift is that when the older brother dies he restores pantheistic worship in Egypt He agrees to assume leadership and proclaim himself pharaoh after having a voice on the wind speak to him As you can see there are a lot of ticklish subjects here for young elementary studentsAs you can see I have strong feelings for and against this work In the context of our homeschool I do think this book made a good contribution however if I were to buy only a few books about Egypt I don't think this one would be on my list

  9. Cris Cris says:

    Beautiful intro to art history BUT the history and the writing craft paint a confusing and incomplete picture Hmmm I'm still debating wether I want to use the book There's a tendency for people today to regard polytheism of old as a panacea of religious tolerance So the missing historical components of Sabuda's storytelling here could be understood to be confusing polytheism and religious tolerance by impressionable readers young and old He focuses solely on the religious differences between Tutankhamen and Amhotep and not at all on the few known facts of his statescraft Did Amenhotep institute the monotheism? Yes But he seems to have been a terrible ruler and that was also why he was hated I can deal with a little poetic license in exchange for a lot of pictures of good Egyptian art in a child friendly story; however I can't say I care for the ambiguous picture of Tutankhamen of restoring truth and beauty surrounded by disembodied entities ?? He may have been looking to illustrate some poetic words but he chose confusing images given the topic More distance has to be used by omniscient writers in children's stories to preserve a historical perspective I love Sabuda's love of art history but he seems to have consistently put out historically flawed books

  10. Danie Plott Danie Plott says:

    Tutankhamen’s Gift is a beautiful way to experience a little bit of Ancient Egyptian history The story reveals the life of Tutankhamen and his predecessors starting first with his respected father and then his tyrannical older brother This would be an excellent book for any child learning about ancient Egypt as Sabuda writes such a simple and enjoyable story that contains great facts and shows the culture of the time Sabuda creates two dimensional artwork that is just as stunning as his three dimensional pop up books He uses an authentic ancient Egyptian style painting on handmade papyrus paper and keeping true to his tedious craftsmanship he constructs his outlines from a single piece of black paper He uses bright colors simple figures and lots of negative space and intricate patterns to give the feeling that the illustrations were found on ancient Egyptian walls and scrolls

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